1872 Prohibition National Convention

The 1872 Prohibition National Convention was a presidential nominating convention held at Comstock's Opera House, in Columbus, Ohio on February 22, 1872, to select the presidential ticket for the 1872 presidential election. It was the first presidential nominating convention of the newly organized Prohibition Party and would continue nominating presidential candidates in every presidential election leading it to become the longest continuous third party in the United States.

1872 Prohibition National Convention
1872 presidential election
James Black (Prohibitionist).jpg John Russell (prohibitionist).png
Nominees
Black and Russell
Convention
Date(s)February 22, 1872
CityColumbus, Ohio
VenueComstock's Opera House
Candidates
Presidential nomineeJames Black of Pennsylvania
Vice presidential nomineeJohn Russell of Michigan
1876 ›

Presidential nominationEdit

On December 9, 1871, a national convention was called to occur on February 22, 1872, by the National Prohibition Committee and was attended by 194 delegates.[1] Simeon B. Chase was selected as the chairman of the party after being introduced by incumbent Chairman John Russell.[2]

The delegates at the convention proposed Chairman Simeon B. Chase, Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase, former Liberty Party presidential nominee Gerrit Smith, former Portland Mayor Neal Dow, Major general Benjamin Butler, Justice David Davis, James Black, Horace Greeley, and John Russell as presidential nominees and Henry Fish, James Black, John Blackman, Secretary Gideon T. Stewart, Julius A. Spencer, John Russell, and Stephen B. Ransom for the vice presidential nomination.[3]

The candidates were sent to a special committee and it chose James Black for the presidential nomination and former Chairman John Russell for the vice presidential nomination. The committee rejected Greeley, who had won the nominations of both the Liberal Republican and Democratic parties, for not being supportive of women's suffrage and Butler for his stances on alcoholic prohibition; Black and Russell were sent back to the delegates and approved by acclamation.[4]

Presidential Ballot Unanimous Vice Presidential Ballot Unanimous
James Black 194 John Russell 194

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Page Eighteen of Brief history of prohibition and of the prohibition reform party". p. 18. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020.
  2. ^ "National Prohibition Convention". The Pittsburgh Gazette. February 23, 1872. p. 1. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Page Twenty Three of Brief history of prohibition and of the prohibition reform party". p. 23. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020.
  4. ^ "Prohibition Convention". The New York Herald. February 24, 1872. p. 4. Archived from the original on March 18, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.