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Where-to-be-born Index

The Economist Intelligence Unit’s where-to-be-born index (previously called the quality-of-life index, abbreviated QLI) attempts to measure which country will provide the best opportunities for a healthy, safe and prosperous life in the years ahead. It is based on a method that links the results of subjective life-satisfaction surveys to the objective determinants of quality of life across countries along with a forward-looking element.

Contents

MethodologyEdit

The index calculated for 2013 includes data from 80 countries and territories. The survey used ten quality of life factors along with forecasts of future GDP per capita to determine a nation's score.[1]

The life satisfaction scores for 2006 (on a scale of 1 to 10) for 130 countries (from the Gallup Poll) are related in a multivariate regression to various factors. As many as 11 indicators are statistically significant. Together these indicators explain some 85% of the inter-country variation in life satisfaction scores. The values of the life satisfaction scores that are predicted by the indicators represent a country's quality of life index. The coefficients in the estimated equation weight automatically the importance of the various factors. The estimated equation for 2006 can be utilized to calculate index values for year in the past and future, allowing for comparison over time as well across countries.[2]

The independent variables in the estimating equation for 2006 include:

  • Material well-being as measured by GDP per capita (in $, at 2006 constant PPPS)
  • Life expectancy at birth
  • The quality of family life based primarily on divorce rates
  • The state of political freedoms
  • Job security (measured by the unemployment rate)
  • Climate (measured by two variables: the average deviation of minimum and maximum monthly temperatures from 14 degrees Celsius; and the number of months in the year with less than 30mm rainfall)
  • Personal physical security ratings (based primarily on recorded homicide rates and ratings for risk from crime and terrorism)
  • Quality of community life (based on membership in social organisations)
  • Governance (measured by ratings for corruption)
  • Gender equality (measured by the share of females holding seats in national Houses of Assembly)

2013 rankingsEdit

 
Where to be born index 2013 World map
Rank Country Score
(out of 10)
1    Switzerland 8.22
2   Australia 8.12
3   Norway 8.09
4   Sweden 8.02
5   Denmark 8.01
6   Singapore 8.00
7   New Zealand 7.95
8   Netherlands 7.94
9   Canada 7.81
10   Hong Kong 7.80
11   Finland 7.76
12   Ireland 7.74
13   Austria 7.73
14   Taiwan 7.67
15   Belgium 7.51
16   Germany 7.38
17   United States 7.38
18   United Arab Emirates 7.33
19   South Korea 7.25
20   Israel 7.23
21   Italy 7.21
22   Kuwait 7.18
23   Chile 7.10
23   Cyprus 7.10
25   Japan 7.08
26   France 7.04
27   United Kingdom 7.01
28   Czech Republic 6.96
28   Spain 6.96
30   Costa Rica 6.92
30   Portugal 6.92
32   Slovenia 6.77
33   Poland 6.66
34   Greece 6.65
35   Slovakia 6.64
36   Malaysia 6.62
37   Argentina 6.52
38   Saudi Arabia 6.49
39   Brazil 6.41
40   Cuba 6.39
40   Mexico 6.39
42   Colombia 6.27
43   Peru 6.24
44   Estonia 6.07
44   Venezuela 6.07
46   Croatia 6.06
46   Hungary 6.06
48   Latvia 6.01
49   China 5.99
50   Thailand 5.96
51   Turkey 5.95
52   Dominican Republic 5.93
53   South Africa 5.89
54   Algeria 5.86
54   Serbia 5.86
56   Romania 5.85
57   Lithuania 5.82
58   Iran 5.78
59   Tunisia 5.77
60   Egypt 5.76
61   Bulgaria 5.73
62   El Salvador 5.72
63   Philippines 5.71
63   Sri Lanka 5.71
65   Ecuador 5.70
66   India 5.67
66   Morocco 5.67
68   Vietnam 5.64
69   Jordan 5.63
70   Azerbaijan 5.60
71   Indonesia 5.54
72   Russia 5.31
73   Syria 5.29
74   Kazakhstan 5.20
75   Pakistan 5.17
76   Angola 5.09
77   Bangladesh 5.07
78   Ukraine 4.98
79   Kenya 4.91
80   Nigeria 4.74

1988 rankingsEdit

The original Where-to-be-born Index was released in 1988. However, this index was a little less serious than 2013 one, as it included a "philistine factor" for a lack of culture and a "yawn index" which measured how boring a country might be despite all its other advantages.[3][4]

Rank Country
1   United States
2   France
3   West Germany
4   Italy
5   Canada
6   Japan
7   Hong Kong
8   United Kingdom
9   Netherlands
10   South Korea
11   Austria
12   Norway
13    Switzerland
14   Belgium
15   Ireland
16   Spain
17   Australia
18   Finland
19   New Zealand
20   Argentina
21   Soviet Union
22   Poland
23   Denmark
24   Hungary
25   Philippines
26   Greece
27   India
28   Mexico
29   Brazil
30   Israel
31   China
32   Portugal
33   United Arab Emirates
34   Venezuela
35   East Germany
36   Singapore
37   Malaysia
38   Yugoslavia
39   South Africa
40   Turkey
41   Indonesia
42   Pakistan
43   Egypt
44   Libya
45   Saudi Arabia
46   Nigeria
47   Iran
48   Iraq
49   Zimbabwe

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "The lottery of life". The Economist. 21 November 2012.
  2. ^ "The lottery of life methodology". The Economist. 21 November 2012.
  3. ^ the economist
  4. ^ WOND: Economist Where To Be Born Index - Business Insider