Waterloo Road (TV series)

Waterloo Road is a British television drama series set in a comprehensive school of the same name, first broadcast on BBC One. The show was filmed and set in the English town of Rochdale from series one until the end of series seven, and the Scottish town of Greenock from the beginning of series eight until the end of its original run. The first episode was broadcast on BBC One on 9 March 2006,[3] and the final episode of the original run was broadcast on BBC Three on 9 March 2015.[4]

Waterloo Road
WaterlooRoadLogo2022.jpg
Title card (2023–present)
GenreSchool drama
Created byAnn McManus
Maureen Chadwick
StarringFull cast
Country of originUnited Kingdom
Original languageEnglish
No. of series11
No. of episodes202 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producers
  • John Yorke (series 1)
  • Anne Mensah (series 1–3)
  • Kathryn Mitchell (series 1)
  • Brian Park (series 1–4, 9–10)
  • Ann Harrison-Baxter (series 2)
  • Spencer Campbell (series 3–4)
  • Gaynor Holmes (series 4–8, 10–present)[1]
  • Ann McManus (series 4–6)
  • Sharon Hughff (series 5–7)
  • Sarah Brandist (series 6–7)
  • Lis Steele (series 6)
  • Claire Ingham (series 7)
  • Cameron Roach (series 7–8, 11-)[1]
  • Claire Mundell (series 9)
  • Johann Knobel (series 10)
  • John Griffin (series 10)
  • Jo McClellan (series 11-)[1]
Production locationsGreater Manchester, England (series 1–7, 11-)
Greenock, Scotland (series 8–10)
Running time58–87 minutes
Production companiesShed Productions (series 1–10)
BBC Scotland (series 8–10)[2]
Wall to Wall (series 11-)
Rope Ladder Fiction (series 11-)[1]
DistributorWarner Bros. Television Productions UK
Release
Original networkBBC One (2006–2014, 2023–present)
BBC Three (2015)
Picture formatDVB-T 576i 16:9 (2006–2009)
HDTV 1080i (2009–2015)
Original release
  • Original series:
    9 March 2006 (2006-03-09) – 9 March 2015 (2015-03-09)
  • Revival series:
    3 January 2023 (2023-01-03) – present (present)

Waterloo Road ran for 200 episodes and exactly nine years. In September 2021, the show was recommissioned for an eleventh series, with production returning to the Greater Manchester area.[5][1][6]

The revival series started airing on 3 January 2023.[7]

PremiseEdit

Waterloo Road is set in a failing comprehensive school of the same name and focuses on both the professional and personal lives of the students and staff.[8]

Ann McManus, the show's cocreator, devised the series in response to the BBC requesting a drama pertinent to "ordinary people in Britain today".[9] She used the programme to explore many topical issues that occur within Britain, applying them to an educational setting.[10]

ProductionEdit

DevelopmentEdit

 
The original setting for the series was the former Hill Top Community Primary School in Kirkholt, Rochdale

The first series contained eight episodes and was first broadcast from 9 March to 27 April 2006 on BBC One.[11] Subsequently, the show was renewed for a second series that was 12 episodes long. This series began on 18 January 2007 and finished on 26 April of the same year. Series 3 was commissioned, consisting of twenty episodes (which would become the normal length of the show's series), and premiered on 11 October 2007 and ending on 13 March 2008. Starting on 7 January 2009, the 4th series consisted of 20 episodes and ended on 20 May. Filming of the 5th series began on 11 May 2009 and began airing on Wednesday 28 October (the previous Sunday for BBC One Scotland). The final episode aired on 15 July 2010. For the first time, the series was recorded in HD.[12]

Production was meant to move locations in 2009, with storylines in the fourth and fifth series designed to coincide with that move.[13] However, these plans did not go ahead, so the show remained in Rochdale until Series 7. The filming of the fifth and sixth series was back-to-back, from 2009 to 2010.[14] The sixth series ran from 1 September 2010 to 6 April 2011.[15][16]

 
From Series 8 to 10 the setting was the former Greenock Academy, on Madeira Street, Greenock.

The seventh series began airing on 4 May 2011 and ended on 25 April 2012.[17] The series lasted for 30 episodes. As part of a BBC initiative to produce more shows out of England,[18] in August 2011 the show was commissioned for fifty episodes, comprising the eighth and ninth series, in a new location in Greenock, Scotland.[19] The Rochdale site was demolished shortly after filming ended in 2011 and is now a housing estate.[20][21] For most of the eighth series, the school was a non-fee charging independent school, as opposed to a comprehensive school as it was for the first seven series.[22] The eighth series, again 30 episodes long, started on 23 August 2012 and concluded on 4 July 2013.[23][24] Starting on 5 September the same year, the ninth series ran until 12 March 2014.[25][26]

Cancellation and returnEdit

On 2 April 2014, the BBC announced that series 10 would be the show's last.[27][28] The final scenes were recorded on 22 August 2014.[29] On 11 December, it was announced that the last ten episodes of the show would be aired first on BBC Three, with a repeat on BBC One later in the evening.[30] The final episode was the show's 200th and aired on 9 March 2015, exactly nine years after the first episode.[31] In the story, the school remains open after a lengthy battle against a school merger.[32] In September 2019, the entire series was made available on BBC iPlayer.[33]

On 23 September 2021, it was announced that Waterloo Road would return with a new series on BBC One.[5][1][6] The series' production returned to Greater Manchester, with the school set at the former St Ambrose Barlow Roman Catholic High School in Swinton.[34] Filming commenced in February 2022.[35] In November 2022, it was confirmed that the series' seven episodes would air from January 2023.[36]

CastingEdit

The show utilises an ensemble cast led by the school's staff members. The longest-running cast members were Philip Martin Brown (Grantly Budgen, series 1–9), Jason Done (Tom Clarkson, series 1–8) and Chelsee Healey (Janeece Bryant, series 1–4 and 6–8, 11).[37]

The original teaching characters consisted of Headteacher Jack Rimmer (Jason Merrells); Deputy Headteacher Andrew Treneman (Jamie Glover); Art teacher and Head of Pastoral Care Kim Campbell (Angela Griffin); Head of English Grantly Budgen (Philip Martin Brown); English teachers Lorna Dickey (Camilla Power) and Tom Clarkson (Jason Done); Head of French Steph Haydock (Denise Welch); and Head of Drama Izzie Redpath (Jill Halfpenny). The student characters included Donte Charles (Adam Thomas), Chlo Grainger (Katie Griffiths), Janeece Bryant (Chelsee Healey), Yasmin Deardon (Rhea Bailey), Mika Grainger (Lauren Drummond) and Lewis Seddon (Craig Fitzpatrick).[38][39]

Series 2 introduced pupil Brett Aspinall (Tom Payne), his father and sponsor governor Roger Aspinall (Nick Sidi) and school secretary Davina Shackleton (Christine Tremarco).[40][41] Other new pupils included Leigh-Ann Galloway (Holly Matthews).

Series 3 introduced new deputy head Eddie Lawson (Neil Morrissey) and, in the seventh episode, new Headteacher Rachel Mason (Eva Pope). Other staff arrivals include NQT English teacher Jasmine Koreshi (Shabana Bakhsh) and Head of Music and Drama Matt Wilding (Chris Geere). Pupils introduced in the third series include Aleesha Dillon (Lauren Thomas), Danielle Harker (Lucy Dixon), Karla Bentham (Jessica Baglow), Paul Langley (Thomas Milner), Bolton Smilie (Tachia Newall) and Michaela White (Zaraah Abrahams).[42][43]

Series 4 introduced the Kelly family, consisting of mother Rose Kelly (Elaine Symons) and her five children: Marley (Luke Bailey), Earl (Reece Noi), Sambuca (Holly Kenny), Denzil (Reece Douglas), and baby Prince. The series features new Head of PE Rob Cleaver (Elyes Gabel), who is sacked when it transpires he is giving Bolton pills to help him win an important match. Rachel's sister Melissa Ryan (Katy Carmichael) and nephew Phillip (Dean Smith) are also introduced.

Series 5 introduced Executive Head Max Tyler (Tom Chambers), Deputy Headteacher Chistopher Mead (William Ash), Head of Food Technology Ruby Fry (Elizabeth Berrington), newly-qualified English teacher Helen Hopewell (Vinette Robinson) and Head of Modern Languages Jo Lipsett (Sarah-Jane Potts). New pupils included Emily James (Shannon Flynn) and her sister Lindsay James (Jenna-Louise Coleman), Siobhan Mailey (Phoebe Dynevor), Ros McCain (Sophie McShera), Luke Pendle (Richie Jeeves), Amy Porter (Ayesha Gwilt), Josh Stevenson (William Rush) and Finn Sharkey (Jack McMullen).

In series 6, Amanda Burton joined the cast as new Headteacher Karen Fisher.[44] Karen's family included children Jess (Linzey Cocker) and Harry (Ceallach Spellman) and her husband and supply teacher harlie (Ian Puleston-Davies). Lucien Laviscount was cast as rebellious teenager Jonah Kirby[45][46][47] and Chelsee Healey also reprised her role as Janeece Bryant as the new school secretary.[48][49] On 21 December 2009, the arrival of new pupils Bex Fisher (Tina O'Brien) and Kyle Stack (George Sampson) was announced; Kyle joined in episode 11.[50] Also introduced in episode 11 were pupils Nate Gurney (Scott Haining), Ronan Burley (Ben-Ryan Davies), Ruth Kirby (Anna Jobarteh).[51][52] Other additions included Ronan Burley's father (Martin Kemp),[53] Head of Spanish Francesca "Cesca" Monotya (Karen David), Head of Pastoral CareAdanna Lawal (Sharlene Whyte) and Geography teacher and father of Jonah and Ruth, Marcus Kirby (Wil Johnson).[54]

Series 7 introduced new Headteacher Michael Byrne (Alec Newman), science teacher and Deputy Headteacher Sian Diamond (Jaye Jacobs),[55] school site manager Rob Scotcher (Robson Green), maths teacher Daniel Chalk (Mark Benton), new Head of English Linda Radleigh (Sarah Hadland), school benefactor Lorraine Donnagan (Daniela Denby-Ashe) and pupil Jodie "Scout" Allen (Katie McGlynn). Guest stars in the seventh series included: Gemma Atkinson, Dominique Jackson, Alicya Eyo, Margi Clarke, Jodie Prenger, Lisa Riley, Tupele Dorgu, Tracy-Ann Oberman, Kai Owen and Jane Asher.[56][57][citation needed]

Series 8 marked the start of Waterloo Road in Greenock, and introduced English teacher Christine Mulgrew (Laurie Brett) and History teacher Audrey McFall (Georgie Glen).[23][58]

Series 10 introduced an extensive set of new characters, including new headmaster Vaughan Ftizgerald (Neil Pearson), his partner and Art teacher Allie Westbrook (Nicola Stephenson), his ex-wife and Geography teacher Olga Fitzgerald (Pooky Quesnel), and Olga and Vaughan's children Justin Fitzgerald (Max Bowden) and Leo Fitzgerald (Zebb Dempster).[59] Other new staff introductions included Deputy Headteacher Lorna Hutchinson (Laura Aikman), Head of Modern Languages George Windsor (Angus Deayton), GPD Teacher Guy Braxton (Regé-Jean Page), Science teacher Marco D'Olivera (Stefano Braschi). New pupils Kenzie Calhoun (Charlotte Beaumont), Rhiannon Salt (Rebecca Craven), Lenny Brown (Joe Slater), Lisa Brown (Caitlin Gillespie), Darren Hughes (Mark Beswick), Shaznay Montrose (Je'Taime Morgan Hanleyand), Scott Fairchild (Andrew Still), Carrie Norton (Tahirah Sharif), Bonnie Kincaid (Holly Jack), Dale Jackson (Finlay MacMillan) and Abdul Bukhari (Armin Karima).[citation needed]

On 24 January 2022, the BBC revealed that Adam Thomas, Katie Griffiths and Angela Griffin would reprise their roles in the forthcoming series as Donte Charles, Chlo Charles and Kim Campbell respectively, with Campbell now as the Headteacher.[35] On 25 November 2022, the BBC released the names of further cast members including Vincent Jerome (Lindon King), James Baxter (Joe Casey), Jo Coffey (Wendy Whitwell), Shauna Shim (Valerie Chambers), Neil Fitzmaurice (Neil Guthrie), Rachel Leskovac (Coral Walker), Katherine Pearce (Amy Spratt), Kym Marsh (Nicky Walters), Sonia Ibrahim (Jamilah Omar) and Ryan Clayton (Mike Rutherford). Actors playing pupil characters include Adam Abbou (Danny Lewis), Priyasasha Kumari (Samia Choudhry), Noah Valentine (Preston Walters), Adam Ali (Kai Sharif), Alicia Forde (Kelly-Jo Rafferty), Francesco Piacentini-Smith (Dean Weever), Liam Scholes (Noel McManus) and Lucy Eleanor Begg (Caz Williams). Scarlett Thomas plays Izzy Charles and fellow junior student casting includes Summer Violet Bird (Tonya Walters), Ava Flannery (Verity King), Thapelo Ray (Dwanye Jackson), Inathi Rozani (Zayne Jackson), Chiamaka (ChiChi) Ulebor (Shola Aku) and Sahil Ismailkhil (Norrulah Ashimi).[60]

Transmissions and ratingsEdit

EpisodesEdit

SeriesEpisodesOriginally aired (UK)Average viewership
(in millions)
First airedLast aired
Original series
189 March 2006 (2006-03-09)27 April 2006 (2006-04-27)4.6
21218 January 2007 (2007-01-18)[a]26 April 2007 (2007-04-26)4.3
32011 October 2007 (2007-10-11)13 March 2008 (2008-03-13)5.0
4207 January 2009 (2009-01-07)20 May 2009 (2009-05-20)4.7
52028 October 2009 (2009-10-28)15 July 2010 (2010-07-15)4.8
6201 November 2010 (2010-11-01)6 April 2011 (2011-04-06)4.9
WRR62 March 2011 (2011-03-02)6 April 2011 (2011-04-06)N/A
7304 May 2011 (2011-05-04)25 April 2012 (2012-04-25)5.1
83023 August 2012 (2012-08-23)4 July 2013 (2013-07-04)4.4
9205 September 2013 (2013-09-05)12 March 2014 (2014-03-12)4.1
102015 October 2014 (2014-10-15)9 March 2015 (2015-03-09)3.6[b]
Revival series
173 January 2023 (2023-01-03)TBATBA
  1. ^ Series 2 began airing on BBC One Scotland on 14 January 2007 and in the rest of the UK on 18 January 2007.[61][relevant?]
  2. ^ The second half of series ten was moved to BBC Three.

The final episode of series 3 attracted 6 million viewers.[62] The final episode of series 4 and 5 each attracted 4.5 million viewers.[63][64]

The finale of series 10 aired on 9 March 2015, nine years after the first episode aired on 9 March 2006.[65]

ReceptionEdit

Revival seriesEdit

Writing in The Telegraph, Poppie Platt rated the series three stars out of five. Platt said that the series featured "just too many characters" with themes that "aren't fully developed", and was "held back by woke dialogue" using too many "cloying buzzwords".[66] In a two-star review for The Guardian, Jack Seale wrote that the series' "attempts to crowbar heavy social issues into a soapy setting are jarring" and the soap opera-esque storylines, like that of Donte and Chlo Charles, felt more natural. However, he noted that this was not an issue for the revival in particular, stating that Waterloo Road was "always a show that felt more important for the boxes it ticked and the services it provided than for the quality of its drama".[67] In The Times, James Jackson gave the series three stars, calling it "an old-school revival that could do better."[68]

Awards and nominationsEdit

Year Award Category Nominee(s) Result
2006 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best New Drama[69][70][71] Waterloo Road Won
2007 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Loved Drama[72] Waterloo Road Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actress[73][74] Jill Halfpenny (Izzie Redpath) Won
2008 Digital Spy Soap Awards Best Serial Drama[75] Waterloo Road Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Loved Drama[76] Waterloo Road Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actress[77][better source needed] Denise Welch (Steph Haydock) Nominated
2009 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actor[78] Neil Morrissey (Eddie Lawson) Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Family Drama[79][80][81] Waterloo Road Won
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actress[82][79][80] Denise Welch (Steph Haydock) Won
2010 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Family Drama[83] Waterloo Road Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actress[84] Denise Welch (Steph Haydock) Won
Royal Television Society North West Awards Best Script Writer[85] Ann McManus Won
Inside Soap Awards Best Drama[86] Waterloo Road Won
2011 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Family Drama[87] Waterloo Road Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actress[87] Amanda Burton (Karen Fisher) Nominated
Inside Soap Awards Best Drama[88] Waterloo Road Won
16th National Television Awards Most Popular Drama[89][90] Waterloo Road Won
British Academy Television Awards Continuing Drama[91][92] Waterloo Road Nominated
Broadcast Awards Best Soap or Continuing Drama[93] Waterloo Road Nominated
2012 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actress[94] Jaye Jacobs (Sian Diamond) Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Family Drama[94] Waterloo Road Nominated
Inside Soap Awards Best Drama[95] Waterloo Road Won
17th National Television Awards Most Popular Female Drama Performance[96] Jaye Jacobs (Sian Diamond) Nominated
17th National Television Awards Most Popular Drama Series[96] Waterloo Road Nominated
2013 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Drama Series[97] Waterloo Road Nominated
Inside Soap Awards Best Drama[98] Waterloo Road Won
2014 TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Drama Series[99] Waterloo Road Nominated
TV Quick and TV Choice Awards Best Actress[99] Laurie Brett (Christine Mulgrew) Nominated
British Academy Scotland Awards Best Actress – Television[100][92] Laurie Brett (Christine Mulgrew) Nominated
Inside Soap Awards Best Drama[101] Waterloo Road Won
2015 Inside Soap Awards Best Drama[102] Waterloo Road Nominated

International broadcastsEdit

Country Network(s) Notes
  • Hong Kong
  • India
  • South Korea
  • Malaysia
  • Singapore
  • Thailand
BBC Entertainment Series 1–3 have been aired in Hong Kong, South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and India. Series 4 has aired.[when?][103]
Europe
    • Armenia
    • Austria
    • Azores
    • Belarus
    • Belgium
    • Bosnia
    • Bulgaria
    • Croatia
    • Cyprus
    • Czech Republic
    • France
    • Germany
    • Georgia
    • Greece
    • Hungary
    • Italy
    • Kazakhstan
    • Latvia
    • Lithuania
    • Luxembourg
    • Macedonia
    • Malta
    • Monaco
    • Netherlands
    • Portugal
    • Moldova
    • Romania
    • Serbia
    • Slovakia
    • Slovenia
    • Spain
    • Sweden
    • Switzerland
    • Turkey
    • Ukraine
BBC Entertainment Series 1 has been aired in a number of European countries.[104]
Estonia ETV Series 1–7 have aired under the name Waterloo Roadi kool (The School of Waterloo Road).
Finland YLE TV1 Series 1–4 have aired under the name Waterloo Roadin koulu (The School of Waterloo Road).
Slovenia Kanal A Series 1 has aired in Slovenia.[104]
  • Bahrain
  • Egypt
  • Iraq
  • Iran
  • Jordan
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Libya
  • Oman
  • Qatar
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Yemen
BBC Entertainment Series 1 has aired in the Middle East. Series 2 has aired.[104]
Israel BBC Entertainment, IETV
New Zealand TV ONE Series 1–3 have aired in New Zealand.[105]
Australia ABC Series 1–10 have aired in Australia.
Russia BBC Prime Series 1 has aired in Russia on Networks Russia GMT+2, Russia GMT+3 and Russia GMT+4.[104]
US BBC America Series 1 has been aired in the USA.[106]
South Africa BBC Entertainment
Spain Canal 3XL and TV3 Series 1–9 have been aired only in Catalonia.[107]

DVD releasesEdit

Series one and two were released by 2entertain, while series three to eight were released by Acorn DVD. Series nine and ten were not released on home media.

Title Episodes DVD release date Total discs Special features
Series 1 8 26 March 2007 3
Series 2 12 10 March 2008 4 Miss Haydock Reveals All
Mika's Video Diary
Series 3 20 2 March 2009 (Autumn Term)
11 May 2009 (Spring Term)
24 May 2010 (Complete)
6 Autumn Term scrap Book
Pupil Reports
Teacher Evaluation
Spring Term scrap Book
Series 4 20 21 September 2009 (Autumn Term)
26 April 2010 (Spring Term)
18 October 2010 (Complete)
6 Autumn Term scrapbook
Spring Term scrapbook
School Photos
Series 5 20 14 June 2010 (Autumn Term)
27 September 2010 (Spring Term)
23 May 2011 (Complete)
6 Deleted Scenes
Bloopers
Cast/Crew Interviews
Waterloo Road Cribs
Series 6 20 7 February 2011 (Autumn Term)
20 June 2011 (Spring Term)
16 January 2012 (Complete)
6 Staff/Student Photos
Outtakes
Social Networking Snaps
Bloopers
Waterloo Road
Reunited
6 9 April 2012 1 Picture Gallery
Series 7 30 7 October 2011 (Autumn Term)
26 March 2012 (Spring Term)
10 September 2012 (Summer Term)
8 April 2013 (Complete)[108]
9 Social Networking Snaps
Series 8 30 4 February 2013 (Autumn Term)[109]
3 June 2013 (Spring Term)[110]
7 October 2013 (Summer Term)[111]
15 September 2014 (Complete)[112]
9 Behind the Scenes
In the Gym with Kaya & Kirstie
In the Lab with Jaye and Jason
Home from Home with Grantly Budgen
The Legends Of
Waterloo Road
6 16 September 2013[113] 2 6 select episodes from series 3 – 8

OnlineEdit

Full episodes from series 1 to series 8 were previously available to watch on YouTube, but were later replaced by highlights of Waterloo Road.[citation needed][excessive detail?] All episodes were made available on BBC iPlayer on 19 September 2019.[33] The popularity of the original show on iPlayer among younger audiences contributed to the show's recomissioning in 2022.[114]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Waterloo Road returns to the BBC". BBC. 23 September 2021.
  2. ^ "Information". Official Waterloo Road Website. Archived from the original on 24 January 2008.
  3. ^ "Episode 1 – Series 1". BBC. Retrieved 28 September 2021.
  4. ^ "Episode 20 – Series 10". BBC. Retrieved 28 September 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Waterloo Road: High school drama to be revived after six years". BBC News. 23 September 2021. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  6. ^ a b Julians, Joe (23 September 2021). "Waterloo Road to return with brand new series". Radio Times. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  7. ^ "Waterloo Road: Why BBC school drama is back after eight-year break". BBC News. 3 January 2023. Retrieved 3 January 2023.
  8. ^ "Introduction" (Press release). BBC Press Office. 6 March 2006. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  9. ^ "Ann McManus - The story behind Waterloo Road" (Press release). BBC Press Office. 6 March 2006. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  10. ^ Lawson, Mark (2 April 2014). "What Waterloo Road taught us about long-running dramas". The Guardian. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  11. ^ "Waterloo Road re-commissioned". Shed Productions. 3 April 2006. Archived from the original on 30 May 2006.
  12. ^ Danielle Nagler (23 June 2009). "Internet Blog: HD Masters Conference Keynote Speech, 23 June 2009". BBC. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  13. ^ "Waterloo Road in Demolition Drama". What's on TV. 28 April 2009. Archived from the original on 22 November 2011. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  14. ^ "Waterloo Road to film back-to-back series". Digital Spy. 6 August 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  15. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Network TV Programme Information BBC Week 35 Unplaced". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  16. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Network TV Programme Information BBC Week 14 Wednesday 6 April 2011". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  17. ^ "Press Office – Network TV Programme Information BBC Week 18 New this week". BBC. Retrieved 1 November 2012.
  18. ^ "Press Office – BBC One drama Waterloo Road to relocate to Scotland". BBC. Retrieved 1 November 2012.
  19. ^ "BBC – Press Office – BBC One drama Waterloo Road to relocate to Scotland". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  20. ^ "Ex Waterloo Road set to remain vacant till demolition". Rochdale Online. 24 April 2012. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  21. ^ "Home of Waterloo Road Set to Be Knocked Down". Rochdale Online. 2 November 2011. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  22. ^ "Waterloo Road relocates to Greenock". BBC. 27 October 2011. Retrieved 6 May 2012.
  23. ^ a b "Waterloo Road". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  24. ^ "Waterloo Road". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  25. ^ "Waterloo Road". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  26. ^ "Waterloo Road". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  27. ^ "Waterloo Road axed by BBC1 after ten series". Radio Times. 2 April 2014. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  28. ^ "Waterloo Road ending after series 10". BBC. 2 April 2014. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  29. ^ "Waterloo Road to film final scenes today". Digital Spy. 21 August 2014.
  30. ^ "Waterloo Road loses BBC One peak slot". Digital Spy. 11 December 2014.
  31. ^ "Waterloo Road". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  32. ^ "Waterloo Road – series 10b". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  33. ^ a b "Every single episode of Waterloo Road is now available on BBC iPlayer". Heart. Retrieved 10 February 2022.
  34. ^ Farber, Alex (23 September 2021). "Waterloo Road revived by BBC". Broadcast. Retrieved 27 September 2021.
  35. ^ a b "Angela Griffin, Adam Thomas and Katie Griffiths to return to Waterloo Road". BBC Media Centre. 24 January 2022. Retrieved 25 January 2022.
  36. ^ "Waterloo Road teases first-look images as series is confirmed to return to the BBC in January". BBC. Retrieved 25 November 2022.
  37. ^ "Where are the Waterloo Road cast now? From Lucien Laviscount to Phoebe Dynevor, many have gone on to bigger and better things". Glamour UK. 22 December 2021. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  38. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road: Introduction". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  39. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road: Character breakdowns". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  40. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road returns for second term". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  41. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road: Character biographies". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  42. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road series three: Cast credits". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  43. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road series three: Characters". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  44. ^ "Press Office – Amanda Burton returns to BBC One in Waterloo Road". BBC. 16 October 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  45. ^ "Linton Manchester News: Lucien Laviscount". Lintonmanagement.co.uk. Archived from the original on 6 October 2011. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  46. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road: cast and crew". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  47. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road: characters". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  48. ^ Name chelsee healey. "chelsee healey (chelseehealey) on Twitter". Retrieved 18 February 2011 – via Twitter.
  49. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Waterloo Road press pack: introduction". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  50. ^ "George Sampson to join 'Waterloo Road'". Digital Spy. 18 February 2010. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  51. ^ [1] Archived 26 February 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  52. ^ "BBC One – Waterloo Road, Series 6, Episode 5". BBC.
  53. ^ [2] Archived 13 August 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  54. ^ "Waterloo Road's Sexy Teacher Karen David On kissing pupils". Daily Mirror. Reach PLC. 13 March 2011. Retrieved 7 June 2022.
  55. ^ "BBC – Press Office – Jaye Jacobs and Alex Walkinshaw join Waterloo Road". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  56. ^ "'Waterloo Road' casts Jane Asher as school inspector". Digital Spy. 15 August 2011. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  57. ^ "Margi Clarke: 'Waterloo Road role was lovely'". Digital Spy. 1 June 2011. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  58. ^ "Laurie Brett swaps Walford for Waterloo Road". BBC. Retrieved 21 February 2022.
  59. ^ Cook, Eva; Atkinson, Kirsty (18 March 2014). "BBC – Neil Pearson and Nicola Stephenson join the cast of Waterloo Road for final season". BBC News. Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  60. ^ "Waterloo Road teases first-look images as series is confirmed to return to the BBC in January".
  61. ^ "TV Listings – Thursday 18 January". Radio Times. London.
  62. ^ "'Ashes', 'Waterloo' triumph for BBC One". Digital Spy. 15 March 2008. Retrieved 28 November 2018.
  63. ^ "8.4m see latest 'Apprentice' fired". Digital Spy. 21 May 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  64. ^ "Press Offic – Network TV Programme Information BBC Week 28 Unplaced". BBC. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  65. ^ Kilkelly, Daniel (9 March 2015). "Waterloo Road's Rebecca Craven on final episode". Digital Spy. Retrieved 9 March 2015.
  66. ^ Platt, Poppie (3 January 2023). "Waterloo Road, series 11 review: the latest battlefront in the culture wars? The school playground". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 4 January 2023.
  67. ^ Seale, Jack. "Waterloo Road review - a lesson in how not to revive a TV show". The Guardian. Retrieved 6 January 2023.
  68. ^ Jackson, James (3 January 2023). "Waterloo Road review — an old-school revival that could do better". ISSN 0140-0460. Retrieved 7 January 2023.
  69. ^ "Readers voting for TV awards decide Doctor and Rose are just the best. – Free Online Library". thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  70. ^ "Doctor Who nets hat-trick of TV gongs". Manchester Evening News. 17 April 2010. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  71. ^ "PressReader.com – Digital Newspaper & Magazine Subscriptions". pressreader.com. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  72. ^ "Welcome to the TVQuick & TVChoice Awards, please cast your vote". 4 July 2007. Archived from the original on 4 July 2007. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  73. ^ "Coronation Street leads ITV success at TV Quick and TV Choice awards". The Guardian. 4 September 2007. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  74. ^ "Awards haul for Coronation Street". BBC. 4 September 2007. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  75. ^ Green, Kris (21 March 2008). "Digital Spy Soap Awards 2008: The Winners". Digital Spy. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  76. ^ Reynolds, Simon (25 June 2008). "TV awards nominations announced". Digital Spy. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  77. ^ "TV Quick Awards, UK (2008)". IMDb.
  78. ^ French, Dan (30 June 2009). "Shortlist unveiled for TV Quick Awards". Digital Spy. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  79. ^ a b "EastEnders scores award hat-trick". BBC. 8 September 2009. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  80. ^ a b "Tragic storyline lands trio of TV awards for EastEnders". belfasttelegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  81. ^ "TV Quick & TV Choice Awards: The Winners". Digital Spy. 7 September 2009. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  82. ^ Ford, Coreena (3 October 2009). "My Denise is just having a laugh, says Tim". ChronicleLive. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  83. ^ Wightman, Catriona (30 June 2010). "TV Choice Awards 2010: The Nominees". Digital Spy. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  84. ^ "Street couple clean up with soap award". Manchester Evening News. 27 April 2010. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  85. ^ "RTS North West Awards 2010". Royal Television Society. 25 March 2011. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  86. ^ "EastEnders sweeps the board at Inside Soap Awards". Evening Standard. London. 11 April 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  87. ^ a b "TV Choice Awards 2011 – Nominees in full". Digital Spy. 27 June 2011. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  88. ^ "EastEnders wins five titles at the Inside Soap Awards". BBC News. 27 September 2011. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  89. ^ "Ant and Dec scoop 10th National TV Award". BBC News. 26 January 2011. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  90. ^ Awards, National Television. "Winners | National Television Awards". nationaltvawards.com. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  91. ^ "Television Awards Winners in 2011". bafta.org. 28 December 2011.
  92. ^ a b "BAFTA Awards Search | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  93. ^ Wightman, Catriona (3 February 2011). "In Full: Broadcast Awards 2011 Winners". Digital Spy. Retrieved 15 March 2022.
  94. ^ a b "TV Choice Awards – soap nominees in full". Digital Spy. 3 July 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  95. ^ "EastEnders wins top prize at annual Inside Soap Awards". BBC News. 25 September 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  96. ^ a b Wightman, Catriona (26 September 2011). "National Television Awards 2012: Nominees". Digital Spy. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  97. ^ Rigby, Sam (1 July 2013). "Broadchurch, Who get TVChoice nods". Digital Spy. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  98. ^ "Emmerdale wins best soap prize at Inside Soap Awards". BBC News. 22 October 2013. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  99. ^ a b Lee, Ben (8 July 2014). "Sherlock, Downton Abbey, Happy Valley make TV Choice Awards shortlist". Digital Spy. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  100. ^ "BAFTA Awards, Scotland (2014)". IMDb. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  101. ^ "See who the winners are at the Inside Soap Awards 2014". BBC News. 2 October 2014. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  102. ^ "Who's leading Inside Soap Awards shortlists?". Digital Spy. 28 September 2015. Retrieved 22 February 2022.
  103. ^ "International Channel". BBC Entertainment. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  104. ^ a b c d "International Channel". BBC Prime. Archived from the original on 21 April 2009. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  105. ^ "About The Show | TV One, TV2, TVNZ 6, TVNZ 7". Tvnz.co.nz. 22 February 1999. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  106. ^ "'Waterloo Road' to air on BBC America". Digital Spy. 30 March 2006. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  107. ^ "Waterloo Road". Canal 3XL. Retrieved 18 February 2011.
  108. ^ "Waterloo Road Series Seven Complete". Amazon UK. 8 April 2013.
  109. ^ "Waterloo Road Series Eight – Autumn on DVD: FREE UK DELIVERY". Archived from the original on 4 February 2013.
  110. ^ "Waterloo Road Series Eight – Spring Term". Amazon UK. 17 June 2013.
  111. ^ "Waterloo Road Series Eight – Summer Term". Amazon UK. 7 October 2013.
  112. ^ "Waterloo Road Complete Series 8". Amazon UK. 15 September 2014.
  113. ^ "Compare Horse Insurance Quotes at BVA Equine". BVA Equine. Archived from the original on 29 October 2013.
  114. ^ Singh, Anita (23 September 2021). "BBC reveals 'new' Northern soap opera – a return to Waterloo Road". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Retrieved 12 January 2023.

External linksEdit