Open main menu

Wikipedia β

Vietnamese mythology[1][2][3]comprises the pre-history national myths of the Vietnamese people together with popular aspects of religion in Vietnam.

Popular heroes and godsEdit

Figures in Vietnamese mythology include The Four Immortals: the giant boy Ian Lahoy, mountain god Tản Viên Sơn Thánh,[4] Chử Đồng Tử marsh boy, princess Liễu Hạnh. One of the Four Immortals also reemerges in the fighting between Sơn Tinh and Thủy Tinh "the god of the mountain and the god of the Water." Historical legend occurs in the story of the Thuận Thiên "Heaven's Will" magical sword of King Lê Lợi.

Adaptions of Chinese mythology occur such as the Four Holy Beasts (the Vietnamese dragon, Kỳ Lân, Turtle and Phoenix). Chinese Shennong appears in Sino-Vietnamese myths with the same characters (chữ Hán 神農) pronounced as "Thần Nông."

Folk mythology includes figures such as the mười hai bà mụ "Twelve Midwives", twelve fairies who teach one-month-old babies skills such as sucking and smiling.[5][6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Vietnamese mythology" in "The Oxford Companion to World Mythology" by David Leeming, p.394
  2. ^ NIKOUBAKHT NASER*, BOZORG BEIGDELI SAEED, VYTI TAME FONG "GODS OF WATER IN IRANIAN AND VIETNAMESE MYTHOLOGY: A COMPARATIVE STUDY" MYTHO-MYSTIC LITERATURE QUARTERLY JOURNAL, WINTER 2013 , Volume 8 , Number 29; Page(s) 141 To 170.
  3. ^ Elisabeth Kemf, Vo Quy "Dance of a thousand Cranes" in "Indigenous Peoples and Protected Areas: The Law of Mother Earth" , ed. Elizabeth Kemf
  4. ^ Olga Dror Cult, Culture, and Authority: Princess Liễu Hạnh in Vietnamese History 2007 Page 162 "Tản Viên, a prominent mountain spirit in Vietnamese mythology, is portrayed in some stories as having helped an ancient king deal with a conqueror from Thu ̇c (modern Sichuan). In the third couplet, the reference to Chử Đồng Tử is ."
  5. ^ Iain Stewart Vietnam Lonely Planet 2012 "Behind the altar on the right are three fairies and smaller figures representing the 12 ba mu (midwives), each of whom teaches newborns a different skill necessary for the first year of life: smiling, sucking and so forth. Childless couples often ..."
  6. ^ Helle Rydstrøm Embodying Morality: Growing Up in Rural Northern Vietnam Page 185 - 2003 "When a child in Thinh Tri is one month old, a special ritual is performed for what is called the "Twelve Midwives" (Muoi Hai Ba Mu). Each of the Twelve Midwives is said to represent a prosperous trait that one would wish for the newborn baby ..."