Open main menu

The University of Arizona Press, a publishing house founded in 1959 as a department of the University of Arizona, is a nonprofit publisher of scholarly and regional books. As a delegate of the University of Arizona to the larger world, the Press publishes the work of scholars wherever they may be, concentrating upon scholarship that reflects the special strengths of the University of Arizona, Arizona State University, and Northern Arizona University.

University of Arizona Press
University of Arizona Press logo.svg
Parent companyUniversity of Arizona
Founded1959
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationTucson, Arizona
DistributionChicago Distribution Center (US)[1]
UBC Press (Canada)[2]
Eurospan Group (Europe)[3]
Publication typesBooks
Official websiteuapress.arizona.edu

The Press publishes about fifty books annually and has some 1,400 books in print.[4] These include scholarly titles in American Indian studies, anthropology, archaeology, environmental studies, geography, Chicano studies, history, Latin American studies, and the space sciences. The UA Press has award-winning books in more than 30 subject areas.[5]

The UA Press also publishes general interest books on Arizona and the Southwest borderlands. In addition, the Press publishes books of personal essays, such as Nancy Mairs's Plaintext and two series in literature: Sun Tracks: An American Indian Literary Series and Camino del Sol: A Chicana/o Literary Series.

Contents

Camino del SolEdit

The University of Arizona began their Camino del Sol Series in 1994, focusing on Chicanx and Latinx Literature.[6] In 2010, Rigoberto Gonzalez edited an anthology honoring the series, also published by the University of Arizona press.[7] Camino del Sol authors include: Farid Matuk,[8] Pat Mora, Daniel A. Olivas,[9] Sergio Troncoso, Luis Alberto Urrea, Vickie Vértiz,[9] Tim Z. Hernandez,[10] Juan Felipe Herrera, Emmy Pérez,[11] Ray Gonzalez, Carmen Giménez Smith,[12] Roberto Tejada, and more.

Published worksEdit

  • Fu, Lo-shu (1966). Fu, Lo-shu (ed.). A Documentary Chronicle of Sino-Western Relations, 1644-1820: Translated texts. Volume 22 of Monographs of the Association for Asian Studies, Volume 1 of A Documentary Chronicle of Sino-Western Relations, 1644-1820. Translated by Lo-shu Fu (2nd ed.). Published for the Association for Asian Studies by the University of Arizona Press. Retrieved 24 April 2014.
  • Martinez, O. . (1994). Border people: life and society in the US-Mexico borderlands. In Border people: life and society in the US-Mexico borderlands University of Arizona Press, Tucson.[13]
  • RACHEL A. MOORE. Forty Miles from the Sea: Xalapa, the Public Sphere, and the Atlantic World in Nineteenth-Century Mexico. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. 2011. Pp. xiii, 230.[14]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Publishers served by the Chicago Distribution Center". University of Chicago Press. Retrieved 2017-09-12.
  2. ^ Publishers Represented
  3. ^ "Eurospan - University Presses". Retrieved 2017-12-27.
  4. ^ "The University of Arizona Press: The Books". www.uapress.arizona.edu. University of Arizona Press. Retrieved 14 March 2017.
  5. ^ Bronson, Ariel. "The University of Arizona Press". Independent Publisher - gbpublisher. Retrieved 2019-08-02.
  6. ^ Olivas, Daniel A. (2010-06-14). "La Bloga: INTERVIEW WITH RIGOBERTO GONZÁLEZ: THE CAMINO DEL SOL ANTHOLOGY". La Bloga. Retrieved 2018-09-29.
  7. ^ Olivas, Daniel A. (2010-06-14). "La Bloga: INTERVIEW WITH RIGOBERTO GONZÁLEZ: THE CAMINO DEL SOL ANTHOLOGY". La Bloga. Retrieved 2018-09-29.
  8. ^ "Farid Matuk". Poetry Center. 2015-01-28. Retrieved 2018-09-29.
  9. ^ a b KXCI. "Borderlands New Wave Poetry Part 1, KXCI". KXCI. Retrieved 2018-09-29.
  10. ^ "Author gives voice to farm workers killed in 1948 plane crash". NBC News. Retrieved 2018-09-29.
  11. ^ "Emmy Pérez". Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation. 2018-09-28. Retrieved 2018-09-29.CS1 maint: others (link)
  12. ^ Hazelton, Rebecca (April 2014). "Reviewed Work: Milk and Filth by Carmen Giménez Smith". Poetry Magazine – via JSTOR.
  13. ^ Martinez, Oscar- (1994-01-01). "Border people: life and society in the US-Mexico borderlands". Border people: life and society in the US-Mexico borderlands.
  14. ^ Piccato, Pablo (2012-04-01). "Rachel A. Moore. Forty Miles from the Sea: Xalapa, the Public Sphere, and the Atlantic World in Nineteenth‐Century Mexico. Tucson: University of Arizona Press. 2011. Pp. xiii, 230. $49.95Reviews of BooksCaribbean and Latin America". The American Historical Review. 117 (2): 576–577. doi:10.1086/ahr.117.2.576-a. ISSN 0002-8762.

External linksEdit