Open main menu

The U.S. Pro Indoor (mainly known as such during its run, but also as the U.S. Professional Indoor, the Ebel U.S. Pro Indoor, the Comcast U.S. Indoor, and the Advanta Championships) is a defunct professional tennis tournament held in Philadelphia, United States from 1968 to 1998. It played on indoor carpet courts, and indoor hard courts. It was part of the World Championship Tennis (WCT) circuit, between 1970 and 1986 it was a major ranking tournament of the Grand Prix Super Series, after which it became a ATP Championship Series (1990–99), then a ATP International Series Gold tournament of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) Tour. It was held annually first at the Spectrum, and then at the CoreStates Center. It was originally named the Philadelphia Indoor Open Tournament prior to the open era.

U.S. Pro Indoor
Defunct tennis tournament
Event namePhiladelphia
TourATP Tour (1990-98)
Grand Prix Tour (1978–89)
GP Championship Series (1970–86)
WCT circuit (1968–77)
Founded1968
Abolished1998
Editions31
LocationPhiladelphia, PA, U.S.
SurfaceHard (i) (1993/97–98)
Carpet (i) (1968–92/94–96)

HistoryEdit

The United States Professional Indoor tennis championships were first created in Philadelphia, United States, in 1968, as part of the newly created WCT circuit, rival of the National Tennis League (NTL). As the first event of the season, the Philadelphia U.S. Professional Indoor attracted all WCT stars at the Philadelphia Spectrum at each of its yearly editions, with Rod Laver, John Newcombe or Marty Riessen winning the event in the early 1970s. After the WCT absorbed the NTL in 1970, the tournament continued to exist within the WCT tour until 1979, when the event officially became part of the Grand Prix Tour, precursor of the current ATP Tour.

As part of the Grand Prix's top tier tournaments until 1986, the Philadelphia event known as the U.S. Pro Indoor since 1973, saw American players dominating the fields in the 1970s and 1980s, with Tim Mayotte reaching four finals, World No. 1s Jimmy Connors and John McEnroe six finals each, and Czechoslovak Ivan Lendl three. In 1985, Swiss watch company Ebel S.A. started its six-year sponsorship of the event, the tournament becoming until 1990 the Ebel U.S. Pro Indoor.[1][2] The event entered the new ATP circuit in 1990 as part of the Championship Series, to see eighteen-year-old, and future US Open champion Pete Sampras win his first career title against Andrés Gómez.

In 1991, the event lost Ebel's sponsorship,[3] and went back to being the U.S. Pro Indoor for two editions, before Comcast became the sponsor of the event in 1992, effectively saving it from being discontinued.[4] In the following years, the Comcast U.S. Indoor's prize money was reduced to less than a million dollars, preventing the creation of attractive line ups, and gaining the nickname "Comatose U.S. Indoor".[5] In 1997, Advanta, already the sponsor of the 1971-created women's tournament of Philadelphia, the Advanta Championships, since 1995, took upon the sponsorship of the men's event, which also became the Advanta Championships. Pete Sampras won his third and fourth Philadelphia titles in the last two editions of the event, now taking place on indoor hard courts at the CoreStates Center, before it was definitely discontinued in 1998.

Past finalsEdit

 
Pete Sampras won his first career singles title in Philadelphia in 1990, defeating Andrés Gómez in the final – he eventually reached four more finals, winning three times

SinglesEdit

Year Champions Runners-up Score
1968   Manuel Santana   Jan Leschly 8–6, 6–3
1969   Rod Laver   Tony Roche 7–5, 6–4, 6–4
1970   Rod Laver   Tony Roche 6–3, 8–6, 6–2
1971   John Newcombe   Rod Laver 7–6(7–5), 7–6(7–1), 6–4
1972   Rod Laver   Ken Rosewall 4–6, 6–2, 6–2, 6–2
1973   Stan Smith   Robert Lutz 7–6(7–2), 7–6(7–5), 4–6, 6–4
1974   Rod Laver   Arthur Ashe 6–1, 6–4, 3–6, 6–4
1975   Marty Riessen   Vitas Gerulaitis 7–6(7–1), 5–7, 6–2, 6–7(0–7), 6–3
1976   Jimmy Connors   Björn Borg 7–6(7–5), 6–4, 6–0
1977   Dick Stockton   Jimmy Connors 3–6, 6–4, 3–6, 6–1, 6–2
1978   Jimmy Connors   Roscoe Tanner 6–2, 6–4, 6–3
1979   Jimmy Connors   Arthur Ashe 6–3, 6–4, 6–1
1980   Jimmy Connors   John McEnroe 6–3, 2–6, 6–3, 3–6, 6–4
1981   Roscoe Tanner   Wojtek Fibak 6–2, 7–6(7–5), 7–5
1982   John McEnroe   Jimmy Connors 6–3, 6–3, 6–1
1983   John McEnroe   Ivan Lendl 4–6, 7–6(9–7), 6–4, 6–3
1984   John McEnroe   Ivan Lendl 6–3, 3–6, 6–3, 7–6(7–3)
1985   John McEnroe   Miloslav Mečíř 6–3, 7–6(7–5), 6–1
1986   Ivan Lendl   Tim Mayotte W/O
1987   Tim Mayotte   John McEnroe 3–6, 6–1, 6–3, 6–1
1988   Tim Mayotte   John Fitzgerald 4–6, 6–2, 6–2, 6–3
1989   Boris Becker   Tim Mayotte 7–6(7–4), 6–1, 6–3
1990   Pete Sampras   Andrés Gómez 7–6(7–4), 7–5, 6–2
1991   Ivan Lendl   Pete Sampras 5–7, 6–4, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
1992   Pete Sampras   Amos Mansdorf 6–1, 7–6(7–4), 2–6, 7–6(7–2)
1993   Mark Woodforde   Ivan Lendl 5–4 retired
1994   Michael Chang   Paul Haarhuis 6–3, 6–2
1995   Thomas Enqvist   Michael Chang 0–6, 6–4, 6–0
1996   Jim Courier   Chris Woodruff 6–4, 6–3
1997   Pete Sampras   Patrick Rafter 5–7, 7–6(7–4), 6–3
1998   Pete Sampras   Thomas Enqvist 7–5, 7–6(7–3)

DoublesEdit

Year Champions Runners-up Score
1968 Competition not held
1969   Tom Okker
  Marty Riessen
  John Newcombe
  Tony Roche
8–6, 6–4
1970   Ilie Năstase
  Ion Țiriac
  Arthur Ashe
  Dennis Ralston
6–4, 6–3
1971 Competition stopped at the quarterfinals stage
1972   Arthur Ashe
  Robert Lutz
  John Newcombe
  Tony Roche
6–3, 6–7, 6–3
1973   Brian Gottfried
  Dick Stockton
  Roy Emerson
  Rod Laver
4–6, 6–3, 6–4
1974   Pat Cramer
  Mike Estep
  Jean-Baptiste Chanfreau
  Georges Goven
6–1, 6–1
1975   Brian Gottfried
  Raúl Ramírez
  Dick Stockton
  Erik van Dillen
3–6, 6–3, 7–6(7–4)
1976   Rod Laver
  Dennis Ralston
  Bob Hewitt
  Frew McMillan
7–6(8–6), 7–6(7–3)
1977   Bob Hewitt
  Frew McMillan
  Wojtek Fibak
  Tom Okker
6–1, 1–6, 6–3
1978   Bob Hewitt
  Frew McMillan
  Vitas Gerulaitis
  Sandy Mayer
6–4, 6–4
1979   Wojtek Fibak
  Tom Okker
  Peter Fleming
  John McEnroe
5–7, 6–1, 6–3
1980   Peter Fleming
  John McEnroe
  Brian Gottfried
  Raúl Ramírez
6–3, 7–6
1981   Sherwood Stewart
  Marty Riessen
  Brian Gottfried
  Raúl Ramírez
6–2, 6–2
1982   Peter Fleming
  John McEnroe
  Sherwood Stewart
  Ferdi Taygan
7–6, 6–4
1983   Kevin Curren
  Steve Denton
  Peter Fleming
  John McEnroe
6–4, 7–6
1984   Peter Fleming
  John McEnroe
  Henri Leconte
  Yannick Noah
6–2, 6–3
1985   Mats Wilander
  Joakim Nyström
  Wojtek Fibak
  Sandy Mayer
3–6, 6–2, 6–2
1986   Scott Davis
  David Pate
  Stefan Edberg
  Anders Järryd
7–6, 3–6, 6–3, 7–5
1987   Sergio Casal
  Emilio Sánchez
  Christo Steyn
  Danie Visser
3–6, 6–1, 7–6
1988   Kelly Evernden
  Johan Kriek
  Kevin Curren
  Danie Visser
7–6, 6–3
1989   Paul Annacone
  Christo van Rensburg
  Rick Leach
  Jim Pugh
6–3, 7–5
1990   Rick Leach
  Jim Pugh
  Grant Connell
  Glenn Michibata
3–6, 6–4, 6–2
1991   Rick Leach
  Jim Pugh
  Udo Riglewski
  Michael Stich
6–4, 6–4
1992   Todd Woodbridge
  Mark Woodforde
  Jim Grabb
  Richey Reneberg
6–4, 7–6
1993   Jim Grabb
  Richey Reneberg
  Marcos Ondruska
  Brad Pearce
6–7, 6–3, 6–0
1994   Paul Haarhuis
  Jacco Eltingh
  Jim Grabb
  Jared Palmer
6–3, 6–4
1995   Jim Grabb
  Jonathan Stark
  Paul Haarhuis
  Jacco Eltingh
7–6, 6–7, 6–3
1996   Todd Woodbridge
  Mark Woodforde
  Byron Black
  Grant Connell
7–6, 6–2
1997   Sébastien Lareau
  Alex O'Brien
  Ellis Ferreira
  Patrick Galbraith
6–3, 6–3
1998   Jacco Eltingh
  Paul Haarhuis
  David Macpherson
  Richey Reneberg
7–6, 6–7, 6–2

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tuller, David (1987-06-07). "What's New In The Tennis Business". The New York Times. Retrieved 2008-09-23.
  2. ^ Bill Fleischman (January 27, 1986). "U.S. Pro Indoor Has Come In From The Cold". Philly.com.
  3. ^ Macnow, Glen (1991-02-12). "Hard Times For Pro Indoor Title Sponsor Missing For First Time In Years". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2008-09-23.
  4. ^ Jensen, Mike (1991-11-08). "New Sponsorship Saves Spectrum Tournament". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2008-09-23.
  5. ^ Fleishman, Bill (1997-02-21). "1996 Finalist Wooruff To Skip Advanta". Philadelphia Daily News. Retrieved 2008-09-23.

External linksEdit