Tuatapere is a small rural town in Southland, New Zealand. It is the self declared "Sausage Capital of New Zealand".[4][5][6] Tuatapere is located eight kilometres from the southern coast. The Waiau River flows through the town before reaching Te Waewae Bay, where it has its outflow into Foveaux Strait. The main local industries are forestry and farming.

Tuatapere
Old Railway Station
Old Railway Station
Coordinates: 46°08′0″S 167°41′0″E / 46.13333°S 167.68333°E / -46.13333; 167.68333Coordinates: 46°08′0″S 167°41′0″E / 46.13333°S 167.68333°E / -46.13333; 167.68333
Country New Zealand
RegionSouthland region
Territorial authoritySouthland
WardWaiau Aparima Ward
Government
 • Territorial AuthoritySouthland District Council
 • Regional councilSouthland Regional Council
Area
 • Total2.00 km2 (0.77 sq mi)
Elevation
30 m (100 ft)
Population
 (2018 Census)[2]
 • Total531
 • Density270/km2 (690/sq mi)
Time zoneNZST
Postal code
9620[3]
Local iwiNgāi Tahu
Websiteonnaturesedge.co.nz
"Sausage Capital" sign
The former National Bank building

Tuatapere has a logging museum[7] and is located on the Southern Scenic Route from Invercargill to Te Anau making it a well-travelled tourist stop. The Clifden Suspension Bridge and Clifden War Memorial are located near State Highway 99 outside Tuatapere.[8]

HistoryEdit

First European settlersEdit

A group of Hungarians settled in Tuatapere, but were assimilated into the general population by the mid 20th century.[9]

RailwayEdit

On 1 October 1909, a branch line railway from Invercargill was opened to Tuatapere and it became known as the Tuatapere Branch. On 20 October 1925, an extension was opened to Orawia, 14 kilometres to the north-east[10] but the line continued to be known as the Tuatapere Branch and an engine depot was established in the town. It was used as the base for most operations on the line and the branch was operated as essentially two sections, one from Invercargill to Tuatapere and one from Tuatapere to Orawia. Until 1968, steam locomotives ran all trains to Tuatapere, but in June 1968, the line was dieselised, resulting in the closure of the Tuatapere engine depot. On 1 October 1970, a lack of traffic meant the line was truncated to Tuatapere, and it was further cut on 30 July 1976 when the section between Riverton and Tuatapere closed. Some relics from the railway have been preserved in Tuatapere, including structures in the station area such as the old station building and goods shed.

2009 Fiordland earthquakeEdit

Tuatapere was one of the closest settlements to the 7.8 magnitude earthquake which occurred on 15 July 2009, the largest in New Zealand since 1931. Despite the earthquake's huge force, little damage was sustained and no injuries were reported.

DemographicsEdit

Tuatapere is described as a rural settlement by Statistics New Zealand. It covers 2.00 km2 (0.77 sq mi),[1] and is part of the much larger Longwood Forest statistical area.

Historical population for Tuatapere
YearPop.±% p.a.
2006579—    
2013558−0.53%
2018531−0.99%
Source: [2]

Tuatapere had a population of 531 at the 2018 New Zealand census, a decrease of 27 people (−4.8%) since the 2013 census, and a decrease of 48 people (−8.3%) since the 2006 census. There were 240 households. There were 273 males and 258 females, giving a sex ratio of 1.06 males per female, with 81 people (15.3%) aged under 15 years, 84 (15.8%) aged 15 to 29, 237 (44.6%) aged 30 to 64, and 138 (26.0%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 90.4% European/Pākehā, 19.2% Māori, 1.7% Pacific peoples, 2.3% Asian, and 2.3% other ethnicities (totals add to more than 100% since people could identify with multiple ethnicities).

Although some people objected to giving their religion, 52.5% had no religion, 32.8% were Christian, 0.6% were Hindu and 1.1% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 39 (8.7%) people had a bachelor or higher degree, and 162 (36.0%) people had no formal qualifications. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 201 (44.7%) people were employed full-time, 57 (12.7%) were part-time, and 15 (3.3%) were unemployed.[2]

Longwood ForestEdit

Longwood Forest statistical area covers 2,198.43 km2 (848.82 sq mi)[1] and also includes Clifden. It had an estimated population of 2,080 as of June 2021,[11] with a population density of 0.9 people per km2.

Historical population for Longwood Forest
YearPop.±% p.a.
20061,947—    
20131,995+0.35%
20181,995+0.00%
Source: [12]

Longwood Forest had a population of 1,995 at the 2018 New Zealand census, unchanged since the 2013 census, and an increase of 48 people (2.5%) since the 2006 census. There were 801 households. There were 1,080 males and 918 females, giving a sex ratio of 1.18 males per female. The median age was 41.4 years (compared with 37.4 years nationally), with 417 people (20.9%) aged under 15 years, 321 (16.1%) aged 15 to 29, 960 (48.1%) aged 30 to 64, and 294 (14.7%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 89.9% European/Pākehā, 12.8% Māori, 1.5% Pacific peoples, 4.4% Asian, and 2.3% other ethnicities (totals add to more than 100% since people could identify with multiple ethnicities).

The proportion of people born overseas was 10.4%, compared with 27.1% nationally.

Although some people objected to giving their religion, 55.2% had no religion, 32.8% were Christian, 0.3% were Hindu, 0.5% were Muslim, 0.6% were Buddhist and 1.4% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 180 (11.4%) people had a bachelor or higher degree, and 420 (26.6%) people had no formal qualifications. The median income was $31,500, compared with $31,800 nationally. 171 people (10.8%) earned over $70,000 compared to 17.2% nationally. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 879 (55.7%) people were employed full-time, 255 (16.2%) were part-time, and 48 (3.0%) were unemployed.[12]

EducationEdit

Waiau Area School is a composite school for years 1 to 13[13] with a roll of 133 as of March 2022.[14] The school first opened in 1910 as Tuatapere School providing primary education.[15] It added secondary education in 1945, becoming Tuatapere District High, and later Waiau District High. In 1953 the school was rebuilt. The primary school split to become Tuatapere Primary in 1977, and the secondary school became Waiau Collage. The two schools merged again to form Tuatapere Community College in 2002, and this adopted the current name in 2012.[16]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "ArcGIS Web Application". statsnz.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved 29 January 2022.
  2. ^ a b c "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. 7029195–7029199.
  3. ^ New Zealand - New Postal Codes (2008). 26 November 2010.
  4. ^ "Giant sausage gifted to Southland town". Stuff. 18 September 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2021.
  5. ^ "Tuatapere's famous sausages set to make a comeback, kind of". Stuff. 3 August 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2021.
  6. ^ "The best and worst New Zealand town slogans". Stuff. 9 July 2021. Retrieved 9 July 2021.
  7. ^ On Natures Edge - Tuatapere.
  8. ^ New Zealand History Online - Clifden war memorial.
  9. ^ Lochore, R. A. (1948–49). "The European Alien Groups Resident in New Zealand". Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand. 77: 348.
  10. ^ Wises New Zealand Guide, 7th Edition 1979. p. 321
  11. ^ "Population estimate tables - NZ.Stat". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021.
  12. ^ a b "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. Longwood Forest (357900). 2018 Census place summary: Longwood Forest
  13. ^ Education Counts: Waiau Area School
  14. ^ "New Zealand Schools Directory". New Zealand Ministry of Education. Retrieved 23 April 2022.
  15. ^ Williams, Dee (2009). The Hole in the Bush: A Tuatapere Centennial Review. Last Side Publishing. ISBN 978-0-473-15258-1.
  16. ^ "Tuatapere School". Invercargill Archives. Retrieved 29 January 2022.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Tuatapere at Wikimedia Commons