Te Anau is a town in the Southland region of the South Island of New Zealand. In Maori, Te-Anau means the Place of the Swirling Waters.[3] It is on the eastern shore of Lake Te Anau in Fiordland. Te Anau is 155 kilometres north of Invercargill and 171 kilometres to the southwest of Queenstown (via state highway 6). Manapouri lies 21 kilometres to the south. Te Anau lies at the southern end of the Milford Road, (State Highway 94) 117 kilometres to the south of Milford Sound.

Te Anau
Te Anau and Murchison Mountains.jpg
Coordinates: 45°25′S 167°43′E / 45.417°S 167.717°E / -45.417; 167.717Coordinates: 45°25′S 167°43′E / 45.417°S 167.717°E / -45.417; 167.717
CountryNew Zealand
RegionSouthland
Territorial authoritySouthland District
WardMararoa Waimea Ward
Government
 • Territorial AuthoritySouthland District Council
 • Regional councilSouthland Regional Council
Area
 • Total5.53 km2 (2.14 sq mi)
Population
 (June 2021)[2]
 • Total2,930
 • Density530/km2 (1,400/sq mi)
Postcode(s)
9600
Area code(s)03

HistoryEdit

The first Europeans (C.J. Nairn and W.J. Stephen) to visit the lake were led by Maori guides visited in 1852. The lake was formally surveyed first in 1863.[4] The township was surveyed in 1893. This was soon after the Milford Track opened. The town only really started to grow after the opening of the Homer Tunnel and road route to Milford in 1953.[5]

DemographicsEdit

Te Anau covers 5.53 km2 (2.14 sq mi)[1] and had an estimated population of 2,930 as of June 2021,[6] with a population density of 449 people per km2.

Historical population
YearPop.±% p.a.
19711,642—    
19762,384+7.74%
19812,610+1.83%
19862,518−0.72%
19912,604+0.67%
19961,785−7.27%
20011,857+0.79%
20061,935+0.83%
20132,001+0.48%
20182,538+4.87%
Populations before 2006 are for a slightly smaller area.
Source: [7][8]

Te Anau had a population of 2,538 at the 2018 New Zealand census, an increase of 537 people (26.8%) since the 2013 census, and an increase of 603 people (31.2%) since the 2006 census. There were 987 households. There were 1,263 males and 1,278 females, giving a sex ratio of 0.99 males per female. The median age was 39.4 years (compared with 37.4 years nationally), with 441 people (17.4%) aged under 15 years, 453 (17.8%) aged 15 to 29, 1,221 (48.1%) aged 30 to 64, and 423 (16.7%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 82.9% European/Pākehā, 8.4% Māori, 1.1% Pacific peoples, 11.8% Asian, and 3.8% other ethnicities (totals add to more than 100% since people could identify with multiple ethnicities).

The proportion of people born overseas was 25.2%, compared with 27.1% nationally.

Although some people objected to giving their religion, 58.9% had no religion, 30.6% were Christian, 1.4% were Hindu, 0.5% were Muslim, 0.7% were Buddhist and 2.1% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 387 (18.5%) people had a bachelor or higher degree, and 354 (16.9%) people had no formal qualifications. The median income was $33,900, compared with $31,800 nationally. 249 people (11.9%) earned over $70,000 compared to 17.2% nationally. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 1,287 (61.4%) people were employed full-time, 345 (16.5%) were part-time, and 18 (0.9%) were unemployed.[8]

WhitestoneEdit

Whitestone is a statistical area which surrounds Te Anau and covers 91.17 km2 (35.20 sq mi).[1] It had an estimated population of 680 as of June 2021,[6] with a population density of 7.5 people per km2.

Historical population for Whitestone
YearPop.±% p.a.
2006378—    
2013540+5.23%
2018618+2.74%
Source: [9]

Whitestone had a population of 618 at the 2018 New Zealand census, an increase of 78 people (14.4%) since the 2013 census, and an increase of 240 people (63.5%) since the 2006 census. There were 231 households. There were 315 males and 303 females, giving a sex ratio of 1.04 males per female. The median age was 48.9 years (compared with 37.4 years nationally), with 108 people (17.5%) aged under 15 years, 81 (13.1%) aged 15 to 29, 309 (50.0%) aged 30 to 64, and 120 (19.4%) aged 65 or older.

Ethnicities were 96.1% European/Pākehā, 10.2% Māori, 0.0% Pacific peoples, 1.9% Asian, and 1.9% other ethnicities (totals add to more than 100% since people could identify with multiple ethnicities).

The proportion of people born overseas was 14.1%, compared with 27.1% nationally.

Although some people objected to giving their religion, 60.7% had no religion, 33.5% were Christian, 0.5% were Buddhist and 0.0% had other religions.

Of those at least 15 years old, 111 (21.8%) people had a bachelor or higher degree, and 90 (17.6%) people had no formal qualifications. The median income was $43,600, compared with $31,800 nationally. 132 people (25.9%) earned over $70,000 compared to 17.2% nationally. The employment status of those at least 15 was that 318 (62.4%) people were employed full-time, 99 (19.4%) were part-time, and 0 (0.0%) were unemployed.[9]

EconomyEdit

 
Te Anau

Tourism and farming are the predominant economic activities in the area. Lying as it does at the borders of Fiordland National Park, it is the gateway to a wilderness area famed for tramping and spectacular scenery. Many tourists come to Te Anau to visit the famous nearby fiords Milford Sound / Piopiotahi and Doubtful Sound / Patea. The town is also used as a base for those undertaking the Milford Track and the Kepler Track, the latter being a 4-day loop from Te Anau. Visitors to the area also partake in activities such as kayaking, cycling, jet boat riding, fishing and hunting, farm tours and seaplane/helicopter sightseeing. In 2014, readers of New Zealand's Wilderness magazine voted Te Anau as the best location in New Zealand for tramping (hiking) opportunities.[10] The town has a wide range of accommodation, with over 4,000 beds available in summer.[11]

GeographyEdit

Lake Te Anau is the largest lake in the South Island and within New Zealand second only to Lake Taupō. Rising on the west side of Lake Te Anau, the Kepler and Murchison mountain ranges are evident from most of Te Anau. Many species of bird life are also found locally, notably the endangered Takahē which can be found at the Fiordland Wildlife Park. The Department of Conservation office in Te Anau is active in protecting endangered native birds[12]

AttractionsEdit

Te Anau hosts the Kepler Challenge in early December each year.

 
Jetty overlooking Lake Te Anau, New Zealand.

A local attraction is the Te Ana-au Caves across Lake Te Anau from the town. The caves include an underground glowworm grotto, which can be viewed from a punt during daily guided tours.[13]

EducationEdit

Fiordland College is a secondary school for years 7 to 13[14] with a roll of 260 students. The college was established in 1976.[15]

Te Anau School - Te Kura o Te Anau is a contributing primary school for years 1 to 6[16] with a roll of 281 students. The school first opened in 1937.[17]

Both schools are coeducational. Rolls are as of March 2022.[18]

TransportEdit

Te Anau is served by Te Anau Airport which is 15 km south of the town on State Highway 95. It was proposed in 2016 to develop the airport in order to enable commercial flights in from Christchurch in order to boost tourism.[19]

Daylight savingsEdit

Te Anau proposed to make daylight savings permanent in the town in 2021. This would enable tourists to the tourist town an extra hour to see the sights.[20][21] Locals propose to call this "Te Anau time".[22][23]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "ArcGIS Web Application". statsnz.maps.arcgis.com. Retrieved 27 January 2022.
  2. ^ "Subnational population estimates (RC, SA2), by age and sex, at 30 June 1996-2021 (2021 boundaries)". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021. (regional councils); "Subnational population estimates (TA, SA2), by age and sex, at 30 June 1996-2021 (2021 boundaries)". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021. (territorial authorities); "Subnational population estimates (urban rural), by age and sex, at 30 June 1996-2021 (2021 boundaries)". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021. (urban areas)
  3. ^ "Community History - Te Anau and Manapouri". www.teanau.net.nz. Retrieved 4 April 2021.
  4. ^ "Lake Te Anau | lake, New Zealand". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 4 April 2021.
  5. ^ "Te Anau | NZHistory, New Zealand history online". nzhistory.govt.nz. Retrieved 4 April 2021.
  6. ^ a b "Population estimate tables - NZ.Stat". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 22 October 2021.
  7. ^ Taonga, New Zealand Ministry for Culture and Heritage Te Manatu. "Town populations in Southland, 1891–2013". teara.govt.nz. Retrieved 27 January 2022.
  8. ^ a b "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. Te Anau (357500). 2018 Census place summary: Te Anau
  9. ^ a b "Statistical area 1 dataset for 2018 Census". Statistics New Zealand. March 2020. Whitestone (357600). 2018 Census place summary: Whitestone
  10. ^ Southland District Council News
  11. ^ "Te Anau". New Zealand on the Web Limited. Retrieved 1 May 2013.
  12. ^ Southland Times
  13. ^ "Te Anau Glow Worm Caves".
  14. ^ Education Counts: Fiordland College
  15. ^ "About Fiordland Collage". Fiordland College. Retrieved 27 January 2022.
  16. ^ Education Counts: Te Anau School
  17. ^ McDougall, Nicci (27 November 2012). "Pupils old and new celebrate 75 years". Southland Times.
  18. ^ "New Zealand Schools Directory". New Zealand Ministry of Education. Retrieved 23 April 2022.
  19. ^ "'Developing Te Anau, Manapouri, Invercargill key to Southland's tourism future' - symposium". Stuff. 22 July 2016. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  20. ^ "Te Anau locals want daylight savings time to stay". RNZ. 20 September 2021. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  21. ^ "Daylight saving: Fiordland tourist town Te Anau decides to stay in 'summer time' forever". NZ Herald. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  22. ^ "Fiordland tourist town of Te Anau to move into daylight saving for good". Newshub. Retrieved 25 September 2021.
  23. ^ "New marketing ideas to lift visitor numbers to Fiordland include permanently expanding daylight hours". Stuff. 19 September 2021. Retrieved 25 September 2021.

External linksEdit