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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Boulder, Colorado, USA.

Contents

Panorama print of Boulder, 1900

19th centuryEdit

  • 1858
    • October 17 - a group of gold prospectors from Fort St. Vrain 30 mi. to the east led by Capt. Thomas Aikens camp in Red Rocks on Boulder Creek in modern-day Settler's Park at the mouth of Boulder Canyon. This was in Arapaho territory, near the camp of Southern Arapaho chief Chief Niwot (Left Hand) (1825-64) in Valmont Butte. Chief Niwot rode to their camp to warn them to leave, but changed his mind after being given food and liquor, and having a dream of a flood washing his people away but letting the white people survive. Due to the prospectors' gifts and the premonition in his dream, he welcomed the visitors, but not before uttering the Curse of the Boulder Valley: "People seeing the beauty of this valley will want to stay, and their staying will be the undoing of the beauty."[1][2]
  • 1859
    • January 15 - gold is discovered in Gold Hill, Colorado above Left Hand Canyon in NW Boulder.
    • February 10 - the Boulder City Town Company is formed, and the town laid out into 4,044 lots, offered for $1,000 each.[3]
  • 1861
    • February 28 - the Territory of Colorado is created by the U.S. Congress, causing Boulder to no longer be part of Nebraska Territory.
    • November 7 - legislation is passed making way for the state university to be located in Boulder.[4]
  • 1869 - Boulder County News begins publication.[5]
  • 1870
  • 1871
    • November 4 - town incorporated.[3]
  • 1873 - Railroad begins operating.
  • 1875
    • September 20 - the first cornerstone is laid for the first building (Old Main Building) on the CU campus.[7]
    • Colorado Banner newspaper begins publication.[5]
    • Boulder High School established.
  • 1876
  • 1877 - September 5 - The University of Colorado officially opens.[8]
  • 1878 - The first mayor, Jacob Ellison is elected for a two-month term.[3]
  • 1880 - The town passes the 3,000 population mark, making it eligible for incorporation.[9]
  • 1882
    • April 3 - Boulder is incorporated as a 2nd class town, and later that month a new town hall is completed in time for the first meeting of the city council.[9]
  • 1883
  • 1885 - Denver, Marshall and Boulder Railway begins operating.
  • 1890
  • 1891 - Feeny Opera House active (approximate date).[10]
  • 1892
  • 1893 - Philharmonic Club formed.
  • 1895 - Crockett Ricketts elected mayor.[12]
  • 1896 - Colorado Sanitarium in business.
  • 1898
  • 1900 - Colorado Chautauqua established.

20th centuryEdit

1900s-1940sEdit

1950s-1990sEdit

21st centuryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20080723191406/http://getboulder.com/visitors/articles/southernarapahoe.html
  2. ^ Frank Fossett (1876), Colorado, Denver: Daily Tribune Steam Printing House, OCLC 1886104
  3. ^ a b c https://bouldercolorado.gov/visitors/history
  4. ^ "University of Colorado History". www.Colorado.edu.
  5. ^ a b c "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  6. ^ A. von Steinwehr (1875). "Boulder". Centennial Gazetteer of the United States. Philadelphia: McCurdy.
  7. ^ "C.U. History". BoulderGuide. June 30, 2009. Retrieved December 9, 2010.
  8. ^ Quarto-centennial celebration, University of Colorado, November 13, 14 and 15, 1902, Boulder, Colo, Boulder, Colorado: Regents of the University of Colorado, 1902
  9. ^ a b c d [1]
  10. ^ a b Charles Ralph. "Opera in Old Colorado". Fort Collins, CO. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  11. ^ a b c Britannica 1910.
  12. ^ Portrait and Biographical Record of Denver and Vicinity, Colorado. Chicago: Chapman Publishing Company. 1898.
  13. ^ "A Boulder Timeline". Boulder History Museum. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2010.
  14. ^ American Library Annual, 1917-1918. New York: R.R. Bowker Co. 1918.
  15. ^ "Brief History of Colorado". Archived from the original on March 7, 2008.
  16. ^ The Colorado Daily, January 12, 2010
  17. ^ John L. Sloop (1978), "National Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory", Liquid hydrogen as a propulsion fuel, 1945-1959, U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, OCLC 68918094, retrieved March 30, 2013
  18. ^ Hernandez, Paul. (March 8, 2017). "Postwar Years: Overview". U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology. Retrieved December 11, 2017.
  19. ^ "NIST Tech Beat". U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology. September 5, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  20. ^ Erik Larson (1995). Lethal Passage: The Story of a Gun. Vintage. ISBN 978-0-307-80331-3.
  21. ^ a b Pluralism Project. "Buddhism in America". America's Many Religions: Timelines. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University. Retrieved October 4, 2013.
  22. ^ Denver Post', January 15, 2010
  23. ^ a b c d "Boulder Sister City Program". City of Boulder, Colorado. Retrieved December 30, 2015.
  24. ^ http://www.bcfm.org/
  25. ^ "R.M.S.E.N. Times". WorldCat. USA: Online Computer Library Center. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  26. ^ "Mountain Sun Pub & Brewery". Boulder. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  27. ^ https://bouldercolorado.gov/sister-cities/yamagata-japan
  28. ^ "Boulder Community Network". Archived from the original on January 1997.
  29. ^ Patricia A. Langelier (1996). "Local Government Home Pages". Popular Government. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 6 (3): 38+. ISSN 0032-4515. Special Series: Local Government on the Internet
  30. ^ "BoulderRunning.com". Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  31. ^ "City Approves 'Carbon Tax' in Effort to Reduce Gas Emissions". New York Times. November 18, 2006. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  32. ^ "Marquee Magazine". Boulder. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  33. ^ McLaren, Warren. "REI To Open New Prototype Green Store in Boulder". TreeHugger. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  34. ^ "Mayor and City Council". City of Boulder. Archived from the original on January 17, 2013. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  35. ^ Meltzer, Erica. "KBCO to leave Boulder for new studio in Denver Tech Center". Daily Camera. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  36. ^ "Colorado: Boulder Votes to Remove Power Company". New York Times. November 2, 2011. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  37. ^ "Our Bylaws". Boulder Food Rescue. Retrieved October 15, 2013.
  38. ^ "NIST Tech Beat". U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology. April 17, 2012. Retrieved March 30, 2013.
  39. ^ Henry Grabar (June 28, 2013). "Hungry? Here's a Map of Every Urban Plant You Can Snack On". Atlantic Cities. Retrieved October 15, 2013.
  40. ^ Daley, John. "As Sanders Rallies For Amendment 69, Colorado Is Again Feeling That Swing State Attention". Colorado Public Radio. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  41. ^ Bear, John. "Boulder protesters rally against Donald Trump, block traffic". Daily Camera. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  42. ^ "State of the Map US 2017 Dates: October 19th - 22nd | OpenStreetMap US". www.openstreetmap.us. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  43. ^ "Boulder bans assault weapons, bump stocks, large magazines". Coloradoan. Retrieved 13 August 2018.
  44. ^ "Renovated, rebranded Museum of Boulder to host grand opening – BizWest". BizWest. 1 May 2018. Retrieved 13 August 2018.

BibliographyEdit

Published in the 19th century
  • "Boulder", The Rocky Mountain Directory and Colorado Gazetteer, for 1871, Denver: Samuel S. Wallihan & Company, 1870
  • "Boulder", History of Clear Creek and Boulder Valleys, Colorado, Chicago: O.L. Baskin & Co., 1880
  • "Boulder". Complete Pronouncing Gazetteer, Or, Geographical Dictionary of the World. Lippincott. 1880.
  • "Boulder". Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Nevada, Wyoming and Arizona Gazetteer and Business Directory. Chicago: Polk & Co. and A.C. Danser. 1884.
Published in the 20th century
Published in the 21st century

External linksEdit