KGNU (1390 AM) & KGNU-FM (88.5 FM) are a pair of community radio stations licensed to Denver and Boulder, Colorado respectively. KGNU is owned by Boulder Community Broadcast Association, Inc.[1]

KGNU / KGNU-FM
KGNU.gif
CityKGNU: Denver, Colorado
KGNU-FM: Boulder, Colorado
Broadcast areaDenver-Boulder-Longmont
FrequencyKGNU: 1390 kHz
KGNU-FM: 88.5 MHz (HD Radio)
Slogan"Independent Community Radio"
Programming
FormatCommunity Radio
AffiliationsPublic Radio International
Pacifica Radio
BBC World Service
Ownership
OwnerBoulder Community Broadcast Association, Inc.
History
First air date
KGNU: 1956
KGNU-FM: May 24, 1978
Former call signs
KGNU:
KFML (1956-1982)
KJJZ (1982-1984)
KPPL (1984-1987)
KMDK (1987-1988)
KFTO (1988)
KDZR (1988-1989)
KJME (1989-2004)
Technical information
Facility IDKGNU: 31349
KGNU-FM: 6512
ClassKGNU: D
KGNU-FM: A
PowerKGNU: 5,000 watts day
139 watts night
ERPKGNU-FM: 4,000 watts
HAATKGNU-FM: 65 meters (213 ft)
Transmitter coordinates
KGNU: 39°39′29″N 105°00′49″W / 39.65806°N 105.01361°W / 39.65806; -105.01361
KGNU-FM: 39°59′33″N 105°9′16″W / 39.99250°N 105.15444°W / 39.99250; -105.15444
Links
WebcastListen Live
Websitekgnu.org

HistoryEdit

KFMLEdit

1390 AM was first licensed on April 4, 1956 and held the call sign KFML.[2] It aired a classical music format and was simulcast on 98.5 KFML-FM.[3][4][5] It originally ran 1,000 watts during daytime hours only and was owned by Evert A. Bancker Jr.[2] In 1961, the station was sold to the Fine Arts Broadcasting Company, along with its FM sister station, for $118,720.[6][2] Its power was increased to 5,000 watts in 1964.[2] In 1966, it was sold, along with its FM sister station, to O'Fallon–O'Connor Broadcasting Inc. for $165,000.[7][2] In 1969, controlling interest was sold to Joseph R. McGoey for $96,250.[8]

In 1971, KFML adopted a progressive rock format.[9][10] In 1975, the station was sold to Radio Denver Corp. for $200,000.[11][2]

Golden Bear Communications ownershipEdit

In 1982, the station was sold to Golden Bear Communications for $760,000.[12][13] The station adopted a jazz format, and its call sign was changed to KJJZ.[14][15][16] In 1984, the station's call sign was changed to KPPL and it adopted an urban contemporary format.[17][18] On July 31, 1985, Golden Bear Communications filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and on October 10, 1985, the proceeding was converted to Chapter 7.[19]

KMDKEdit

In 1987, the station was sold to Huttner Health Network for $265,000.[20][21] Its call sign was changed to KMDK, and it began airing a health-talk format branded "K-Medic".[22][23]

KDZREdit

On June 13, 1988 its call sign was changed to KFTO, and on June 23, 1988 its call sign was changed to KDZR.[24] As KDZR, the station was initially an affiliate of Z Rock, airing a heavy metal/hard rock format.[23] On November 14, 1988, it adopted a business talk format and became an affiliate of the Business Radio Network.[25][26]

KJMEEdit

In 1989, the station's call sign was changed to KJME and it began airing a Spanish language format.[24][26][27][28] In 1990, KJME was sold to Jo-Mor Communications for $350,000.[29] In 1991, the station was fined $5,000 for operating at 450% in excess of its licensed power.[30]

KGNUEdit

KGNU-FM began broadcasting May 24, 1978.[18] In 2004, Boulder Community Broadcast Association purchased AM 1390 KJME in Denver for $4.1 million, and its call sign was changed to KGNU.[31][24]

KGNU's programming follows a variety radio format, featuring a mix of music, news and information. Local shows are hosted by volunteers. The station also carries syndicated programs distributed by Public Radio International, Pacifica Radio and BBC World Service.[32] KGNU is a member of the Grassroots Radio Coalition, which it helped found in 1996.[33][34]

In 2018, the station's 40th anniversary was commemorated by a six-week exhibit, "Listening Together", at the Museum of Boulder.[35] Beginning in 2019, the station embarked on a capital campaign to raise $1.25M, with an equal amount to be matched by the City of Boulder, as part of the voter-approved 2017 Community, Culture and Safety Tax.[36]

FacilitiesEdit

In the summer of 2010, KGNU-FM was granted permission to increase its FM transmitter power to 4,000 watts ERP. KGNU (AM) operates at 5,000 watts by day but must reduce power to 139 watts at night to protect other radio stations on 1390 kHz. The AM transmitter is in Englewood, Colorado off South Wyandott Street. The FM transmitter is in Louisville, Colorado near the Louisville Reservoir, on a tower 213 feet (65 meters) HAAT.[37] KGNU also operates a 28-watt FM translator K229AC at 93.7 MHz in Nederland, Colorado,[38] and a 7-watt FM translator K254CH in Laporte, Colorado, which simulcasts KGNU-FM on 98.7 MHz.[39][40]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ AM Query Results: KGNU, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 10, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f History Cards for KGNU, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  3. ^ "Stations By Format", Billboard. May 30, 1964. p. 16. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  4. ^ "Stations By Format", Billboard. May 15, 1965. p. 16. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  5. ^ "11 Classical Stations Form Separate Assn.", Billboard. April 5, 1969. p. 3. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  6. ^ "Changing hands", Broadcasting. May 22, 1961. p. 52. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  7. ^ "Changing hands", Broadcasting. March 7, 1966. p. 61. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  8. ^ "Ownership changes", Broadcasting. December 22, 1969. p. 68. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  9. ^ Glassenberg, Bob. "KFML Makes Shift to Free-Form Play Because of a Tremendous Need", Billboard. June 5, 1971. pp. 23, 24. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  10. ^ Hall, Claude. "Rock Prog. Dir. Stresses Individual", Billboard. December 18, 1971. p. 22. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  11. ^ "Ownership changes", Broadcasting. March 24, 1975. p. 55. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  12. ^ "Ownership changes", Broadcasting. January 4, 1982. p. 91. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  13. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. August 2, 1982. p. 53. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  14. ^ "Street Talk", Radio & Records. January 8, 1982. p. 18. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  15. ^ Love, Walt. "'82 in Review", Radio & Records. December 10, 1988. p. 52. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  16. ^ "KJJZ Denver Takes Steps to Fill Programming Void", Billboard. December 4, 1982. p. 44. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  17. ^ "Call Letters", Broadcasting. November 12, 1984. p. 84. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  18. ^ a b Broadcasting/Cablecasting Yearbook 1985, Broadcasting/Cablecasting, 1985. p. B-41, B-43. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  19. ^ FCC Record: A Comprehensive Compilation of Decisions, Reports, Public Notices, and Other Documents of the Federal Communications Commission of the United States. Federal Communications Commission. Volume 2, Issues 1-4. 1987. p. 1274. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  20. ^ "For the Record", Broadcasting. July 13, 1987. p. 56. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  21. ^ Public Notice Comment: BAPL-19870624EH, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  22. ^ "Call Letters", Broadcasting. December 21, 1987. p. 66. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  23. ^ a b Ross, Sean; Olson, Yvonne. "Vox Jox", Billboard. July 16, 1988. p. 15. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  24. ^ a b c Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  25. ^ "KDZR Drops Hard Rock Format; KADX Jettisons Jazz, Picks Up Z-Rock", Radio & Records. November 18, 1988. p. 4. Retrieved January 11, 2021.
  26. ^ a b Ross, Sean. "Vox Jox", Billboard. August 19, 1989. p. 12. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  27. ^ The Broadcasting Yearbook 1990, Broadcasting, 1990. p. B-53. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  28. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 2003-2004, Broadcasting & Cable, 2003-2004. p. B-53. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  29. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. March 19, 1990. p. 70. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  30. ^ "Washington This Week", The M Street Journal. Vol. 8, No. 12. March 25, 1991. p. 5. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  31. ^ "Colorado noncom doubles in Denver market", Radio Business Report. Volume 21, Issue 202. October 15, 2004. Retrieved January 10, 2021.
  32. ^ "About Us". KGNU official website. Retrieved 2009-03-24.
  33. ^ "Member Stations". Grassroots Radio Coalition. Retrieved 2009-03-24.
  34. ^ Durlin, Marty; Melio, Cathy (2003). McCauley, Michael P.; et al. (eds.). "The Grassroots Radio Movement in the United States". Public Broadcasting and the Public Interest. Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe: 252–264. ISBN 0-7656-0991-6. Retrieved 2009-03-25.
  35. ^ ""Listening Together" opens at The Museum of Boulder on August 4". KGNU News. 3 August 2018. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  36. ^ "Boulder's KGNU Radio is Thriving". Boulder Daily Camera. 2019-03-27. Retrieved 2019-11-16.
  37. ^ http://radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/patg?id=KGNU-FM
  38. ^ "K229AC-FM 93.7 MHz Radio Station Information". radio-locator.com. Retrieved 2017-05-03.
  39. ^ "KGNU 98.7 enters 2017 with new FM signal covering Fort Collins". North Forty News. 2017-01-10. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  40. ^ Udell, Erin (2017-01-06). "Boulder radio station expands reach to Fort Collins". Coloradoan. Retrieved 2019-02-21.

External linksEdit