Temple Sinai (Denver)

Temple Sinai is a Reform synagogue located at 3509 South Glencoe in Denver, Colorado.[2]

Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai (Denver, Colorado)
The temple in 2013.
Religion
AffiliationReform Judaism
Leadership
  • Rabbi Richard S. Rheins
  • Chazzan Bryan Zive
  • Rabbi Keren Gorban
  • Acting Executive Director Amy Becker
  • President Neil Culbertson
StatusActive
Location
Location3509 South Glencoe
Denver, Colorado, U.S.
Architecture
Architect(s)Curtis Fentress[1]
Completed1984[1]
Website
sinaidenver.org

HistoryEdit

It was started in 1967 by Rabbi Raymond A. Zwerin, who had been ordained three years prior at the Hebrew Union College.[3]

The workbook Tzedakah, Gemilut Chasadim, and Ahavah: A Manual for World Repair (1990), by Joel Lurie Grishaver and Beth Huppin, was piloted at the synagogue.[4]

In September 1995, more than 650 members of the synagogue spent a day removing graffiti in Denver, painting buildings, cooking pastries, repairing toys, scraping walls, and potting plants, in an effort to fulfill a mitzvah.[5]

ServicesEdit

It is a full-functioning synagogue with a religious school catering to preschoolers through confirmation students. Services are held every Friday night, Saturday morning, and on holidays. The synagogue has a pre-school.[6]

BuildingEdit

The synagogue has a large multicolored mural of children at play.[7] The current building was built in 1984.[1] In 2003, a meditation garden was constructed in 2003.[8]

RecognitionEdit

In 2011, Temple Sinai received a $21,000 grant from the Rose Community Foundation for the integration of special-needs children into its religious school.[9]

The temple's maintenance manual was featured in The Temple Management Manual (2003), by the National Association of Temple Administrators (U.S.), Union of American Hebrew Congregations.[10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Fentress, Curtis (2010). Touchstones of Design: Redefining Public Architecture. Images Publishing Group Party Ltd. ISBN 978-1-86470-382-5. Retrieved 2013-12-13.
  2. ^ Sheldon, Betsy (2001). The Jewish Travel Guide. Edison, NJ: Hunter Publishing, Inc. ISBN 1-55650-879-4. Retrieved 2013-12-13.
  3. ^ Fallace, Thomas Daniel (2008). The emergence of Holocaust education in American schools. Macmillan. ISBN 9780230603998. Retrieved June 23, 2011.
  4. ^ Grishaver, Joel Lurie; Huppin, Beth (1990). Tzedakah, Gemilut Chasadim, and Ahavah: A Manual for World Repair. Alternatives in Religious Education. ISBN 9780867051391. Retrieved June 23, 2011.
  5. ^ Virginia Culver (September 9, 1995). "Temple members plan good-deed day; They will fulfill a mitzvah with 40 projects". Denver Post. Retrieved June 23, 2011.
  6. ^ "Temple Sinai Preschool Lm in Denver, CO". Elementaryschools.org. Retrieved June 23, 2011.
  7. ^ Tornberg, Robert E. (1998). The Jewish Educational Leader's Handbook. Behrman House. p. 643. ISBN 978-0-86705-043-1.
  8. ^ Gorski, Eric (September 26, 2003). "Temple transformation; Synagogues experiment with offerings to bring Jews back into the fold". Denver Post. Archived from the original on July 13, 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-13.
  9. ^ "News from Rose Community Foundation". Rose Community Foundation. January 21, 2011. Archived from the original on October 14, 2011. Retrieved June 22, 2011.
  10. ^ The Temple Management Manual. URJ Books and Music. 2003. ISBN 0-8074-0902-2.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 39°39′8.86″N 104°55′36.09″W / 39.6524611°N 104.9266917°W / 39.6524611; -104.9266917