Talk:Scheitholt

Add topic
Active discussions
WikiProject Germany (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Germany, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Germany on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
B checklist
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Musical Instruments  
WikiProject iconThis article is within the scope of WikiProject Musical Instruments, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of musical instruments on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
??? This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 


BowedEdit

It's bowed, correct? Badagnani (talk) 20:27, 28 April 2008 (UTC)

Not generally, I believe you're thinking of the Icelandic langeleik MatthewVanitas (talk) 20:40, 28 April 2008 (UTC)

I think the Scheitholt was primarily bowed, as the very earliest German-introduced lap dulcimers in the U.S. were. The langeleik of Norway is not generally bowed, although the langspil of Iceland is. Badagnani (talk) 20:41, 28 April 2008 (UTC)

I checked Grove; it looks like the scheitholt is strummed, but the one that was (sometimes) bowed is the hummel, of Friesland and Holland. Badagnani (talk) 20:44, 28 April 2008 (UTC)

Ah, I confused myself as to which was the Icelandic one. Good thing wiki is based on consensus, and not my silly mistakes. MatthewVanitas (talk) 20:46, 28 April 2008 (UTC)

It looks like there is speculation that the Scheitholt was bowed. See this site, as well as other sources online. Badagnani (talk) 20:47, 28 April 2008 (UTC)

The term "noter"Edit

At first, I started to edit the article, but then realized that my knowledge on the topic is too limited. Beyond doubt, I've heard Appalachian dulcimer players refer to their "noters", and most likely, have witnessed a player using one, decades ago. However, I then realized that other cultures/languages might also have their own similar term.

Acoustically, the noter must have minimal influence, as contrasted with the much more massive glass tubes and such (sorry; need a/the term) used by (slide(?)) guitarists to stop their strings at any arbitrary point, making glissandos simple.

{Oh, shucks; persistent logins apparently don't encompass Talk pages.} User: nikevich, using DHCP — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.184.121.225 (talk) 16:48, 1 March 2015 (UTC)