Talk:Fort Washington (Ohio)

Active discussions
WikiProject United States / Ohio / Cincinnati (Rated B-class, Low-importance)
This article is within the scope of WikiProject United States, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of topics relating to the United States of America on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the ongoing discussions.
B-Class article B  This article has been rated as B-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Ohio (marked as Mid-importance).
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by WikiProject Cincinnati (marked as Mid-importance).
WikiProject Military history (Rated B-Class)
MILHIST This article is within the scope of the Military history WikiProject. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. To use this banner, please see the full instructions.
B This article has been rated as B-Class on the quality assessment scale.

Battle of Fallen TimbersEdit

There's no mention of Gen. Anthony Wayne's monumental victory at Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794 that basically secured the Northwest Territory for the United States. Sbalfour (talk) 00:08, 1 December 2018 (UTC)[]

Confluence of forcesEdit

The construction of Fort Washington was a confluence of forces. There was impetus by President Washington to secure the Ohio River frontier to the west at least as far as Louisville with a line of strong forts. There was Fort Pitt, Fort McIntosh, Fort Henry, Fort Harmar and Fort Nelson; there was a big gap between the latter two and a convenient confluence of the Great Miami and Ohio Rivers where a fort could be built. Washington also envisioned extending the forts north along the Great Miami River deep into Indian territory to secure Ohio Country and neutralize the Miami stronghold at Kekionga. For that, he needed an anchor fort. The third impetus was the tenuous survival of the three tiny settlements in the Symmes purchase: Losantiville, North Bend and Columbia near the confluence. So in the Summer of 1789, an expedition under Maj. John Doughty who supervised the construction of Fort Harmar, was launched to scout the area.

Sbalfour (talk) 20:39, 14 December 2018 (UTC)[]

Return to "Fort Washington (Ohio)" page.