Talk:Epic Pooh

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UntitledEdit

On the external link Epic Pooh Moorcock says that the article was written for the 1989 book. However, the book says it's copyright 1987 and published the same year.

J. K. RowlingEdit

If he wrote the article in 1978, and republished it in 1987, how could he write anything about J. K. Rowling? --Boxinaboxinabox 08:41, 7 February 2007 (UTC)

new revision —The preceding unsigned comment was added by LamontCranston (talkcontribs) 06:48, 30 March 2007 (UTC).

PullmanEdit

Philip Pullman is not cited in the article.

direct quotesEdit

I assume these are direct quotes

<quote> ...are successful. It is the tone of Warwick Deepings Sorrell and Son, of John Steinbeck at his worst, or, in a more sophisticated form... and from the revised version ..are successful. It is the tone of many forgotten British and American bestsellers, well-remembered children's books, like The Wind in the Willows, you often hear it in regional fiction addressed to a local audience, or, in a more sophisticated form... </quote>

but they are not placed in quotation marks, rather appearing in italic. Warwick Deepings needs an apostrophe (Deeping's) or a note that it is incorrect in the origial [sic]. The truncation of the quotes seems odd, but the use of italics instead of quotes means that the titles can't be italicized as they should (as in the revised original, anyway), instead being reverse italicized.

I will make the changes, but the original version needs to be checked for the possessive and properly cited. It would look better as block quotes since they are meant to be compared, but that violates most block quote guidelines since the quotes are only a couple of lines long. --Moretz (talk) 13:57, 14 June 2010 (UTC)

I added those quite a long time ago and wasn't too sure how much quoting would be considered fair use. OF course it would be permissible to use the entire paragraph from the original and the revision. It may be a good idea to compare both paragraphs as almost the entire section between "It is the tone..." and "...it contains little wit and much whimsy." are different. Let me know and I can copy the section from the book, and yep it was supposed to be Deeping's. Enter CBW, waits for audience applause, not a sausage. 04:45, 15 June 2010 (UTC)
I have just read the "Revisions" section four times and haven't a clue what it means. Tigerboy1966  20:09, 28 March 2016 (UTC)

ItalicsEdit

If this is just an article in a collection, shouldn't it be quotated rather than italicized? 75.201.145.204 (talk) 03:38, 28 March 2012 (UTC)

GrammarEdit

I don't think this is a sentence: "As an example, from the original "... are successful. It is the tone of Warwick Deeping's Sorrell and Son, of John Steinbeck at his worst, or, in a more sophisticated form..."[1] and from the revised version "... are successful. It is the tone of many forgotten British and American bestsellers, well-remembered children's books, like The Wind in the Willows, you often hear it in regional fiction addressed to a local audience, or, in a more sophisticated form..."[2]" SharkD  Talk  02:23, 27 March 2017 (UTC)