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Talk:DES-X

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UntitledEdit

I believe DESX was used as the algorithm for encrypted containers in Windows 2000.

I also remember reading about an Al-Queda laptop that was recovered by Allied forces. Export-grade (low key size) DESX encryption was used on the laptop but that did not prevent the intelligence agencies (NSA?) from decrypting everything.—Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.163.167.174 (talkcontribs) 13:42, 12 November 2005

Since back when "export grade cryptography" meant anything, it meant 40-bit encryption (i.e. keys of strength equivalent to 40 bits or less); since plain DES has a 56 bit key; and since DES-X strengthens the keying, the idea of "Export-grade (low key size) DESX" makes no sense at all. I suspect you were on the wrong end of a much distorted rumour. -- Securiger (talk) 10:33, 2 November 2008 (UTC)

Broken linkEdit

The link to "How to protect DES against exhaustive key search" (http://wwwcsif.cs.ucdavis.edu/~rogaway/papers/desx.ps) is broken; I have found (well, Google has!) what I think is the same material at http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/~rogaway/papers/desx.pdf. As I'm not confident with how I should change (if at all) the other data that surrounds the reference (Springer-Verlag (1996), pp. 252–267, etc) I'll refrain from changing the URL, and let a more experienced editor do the change.

Thanks. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Rgiuntoli (talkcontribs) 15:03, 6 March 2014 (UTC)

Return to "DES-X" page.