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The Sun Bowl is a college football bowl game that has been played since 1935 in the southwestern United States at El Paso, Texas. Along with the Sugar Bowl and Orange Bowl, it is the second-oldest bowl games in the country, behind the Rose Bowl. Usually held near the end of December, games are played at the Sun Bowl stadium on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso; since 2011, it has featured teams from the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) and the Pac-12 Conference.

Sun Bowl
Tony the Tiger Sun Bowl
"Tony the Tiger Sun Bowl"
Tony the Tiger Sun Bowl.jpg
StadiumSun Bowl
LocationEl Paso, Texas, U.S.
Previous stadiumsKidd Field (1938–1962)
Jones Stadium
(1935–1937)
Operated1935–present
Conference tie-insPac-12, ACC
Previous conference tie-insBig Ten (1995–2005)
Big 12 (2006–2009)
Big East/Notre Dame (2006–2009)
PayoutUS$2,150,000
(as of 2015)[1]
Sponsors
John Hancock (1987–1993)
Norwest Corporation (1996–1998)
Wells Fargo (1999–2003)
Helen of Troy Limited (2004–2009;
     through its Vitalis and Brut brands)
Hyundai (2010–2018)
Kellogg's (2019- present)
Former names
Sun Bowl (1936–1986)
John Hancock Sun Bowl (1987–1988)
John Hancock Bowl (1989–1993)
Sun Bowl (1994–1995)
Norwest Bank Sun Bowl (1996)
Norwest Sun Bowl (1997–1998)
Wells Fargo Sun Bowl (1999–2003)
Vitalis Sun Bowl (2004–2005)
Brut Sun Bowl (2006–2009)
Hyundai Sun Bowl (2010-2018)
2017 matchup
Arizona State vs. NC State (NC State 52–31)
2018 matchup
Pittsburgh vs. Stanford (Stanford 14–13)
El Paso is located in the United States
El Paso
El Paso
Location in the United States
 El Paso is located in Texas
 El Paso
 El Paso
Location in Texas

Since 2019, the game has been sponsored by Kellogg's and is officially known as the Tony the Tiger Sun Bowl.[2], after the mascot for the company's cereal Kellogg's Frosted Flakes. Previous sponsors include John Hancock (1987–1993), Norwest Corporation (1996–1998), Wells Fargo (1999–2003), Vitalis (2004–2005), Brut (2006–2009) and Hyundai (2010-2018).

HistoryEdit

The first Sun Bowl was the 1935 edition, played on New Year's Day between Texas high school teams;[3] the 1936 edition, played one year later, was the first Sun Bowl contested between college teams.[4] In most of its early history, the game pitted the champion of the Border Conference against an at-large opponent.[5] The first three editions were played at El Paso High School stadium (1935–1937), then switched to Kidd Field until the present stadium was ready in 1963.[6] Through the 1957 season, the game was played on January 1 or January 2; since then, with the exception of the 1976 season, the game has been played in late December, with a majority of games played on or near New Year's Eve.[4]

Notable gamesEdit

The 1940 game set the record for fewest points scored, when the Arizona State Teachers College at Tempe Bulldogs played the Catholic University Cardinals to a scoreless tie, the only 0–0 result in Sun Bowl history.

In advance of the 1949 game, Lafayette College turned down an invitation from the Sun Bowl Committee because the committee would not allow an African American player to participate. This bid rejection led to a large student demonstration on the Lafayette campus and in the city of Easton, Pennsylvania, against segregation.

Due to a freak snowstorm before the 1974 game,[7] followed by warming temperatures as the sun created a rising steam from the field during the first half, the game was nicknamed the "Fog Bowl."[5]

The 1992 game was the final head coaching appearance of 2001 College Football Hall of Fame inductee Grant Teaff of Baylor; his Bears won 20–15 over Arizona.[8]

The 1994 game was voted the greatest Sun Bowl ever played, and included four touchdowns by Priest Holmes, as Texas defeated North Carolina.[5]

The 2005 game set the record for most points scored (88), as UCLA defeated Northwestern 50–38.

Since the NCAA started the use of overtime in Division I bowl games in 1995,[9] the 2011 game is the only Sun Bowl decided in overtime; Utah defeated Georgia Tech, 30–27.[4]

SponsorshipEdit

From 2010 to 2018, the tournament was sponsored by the Hyundai Motor Company (succeeding Helen of Troy Limited, Norwest Corporation/Wells Fargo, and John Hancock Insurance as past sponsors)..[10] Hyundai renewed its sponsorship through the 2018 season; in August 2019, it was announced that Kellogg's had been named the new title sponsor, and that the game would be branded as the Tony the Tiger Sun Bowl—referencing Tony the Tiger, the mascot of the company's cereal brand Frosted Flakes.[11]

Conference tie-insEdit

Starting with the 2011 edition, the bowl has been contested between teams from the Pac-12 and ACC.

The Sun Bowl is part of the ACC's pool arrangement where the Belk, Pinstripe, Music City, and Gator bowls each share choice of the conference's eligible teams following the College Football Playoff (CFP) and the Camping World Bowl. The Sun Bowl can take any team ranked fourth through eighth in the ACC.

The Pac-12 currently employs the Sun Bowl as its fifth choice, behind the CFP and the Alamo, Holiday, and Redbox (formerly Foster Farms) bowls.

Game resultsEdit

Italics denote a tie game.

No. Date played Winning team Losing team Attnd. Notes
1 January 1, 1935 El Paso All-Stars 25 Ranger (Texas) 21 3,000 notes 
2 January 1, 1936 Hardin–Simmons 14 New Mexico A&M 14 12,000 notes
3 January 1, 1937 Hardin–Simmons 34 Texas Mines 6 8,000 notes
4 January 1, 1938 West Virginia 7 Texas Tech 6 12,000 notes
5 January 2, 1939 Utah 26 New Mexico 0 13,000 notes
6 January 1, 1940 Arizona State 0 Catholic 0 13,000 notes
7 January 1, 1941 Western Reserve 26 Arizona State 13 14,000 notes
8 January 1, 1942 Tulsa 6 Texas Tech 0 14,000 notes
9 January 1, 1943 Second Air Force 13 Hardin–Simmons 7 18,000 notes
10 January 1, 1944 Southwestern 7 New Mexico 0 18,000 notes
11 January 1, 1945 Southwestern 35 UNAM 0 13,000 notes
12 January 1, 1946 New Mexico 34 Denver 24 15,000 notes
13 January 1, 1947 Cincinnati 18 Virginia Tech 6 10,000 notes
14 January 1, 1948 Miami (Ohio) 13 Texas Tech 12 18,000 notes
15 January 1, 1949 West Virginia 21 Texas Mines 12 13,000 notes
16 January 2, 1950 Texas Western 33 Georgetown 20 15,000 notes
17 January 1, 1951 West Texas State 14 Cincinnati 13 16,000 notes
18 January 1, 1952 Texas Tech 25 Pacific 14 17,000 notes
19 January 1, 1953 Pacific 26 Southern Miss 7 11,000 notes
20 January 1, 1954 Texas Western 37 Southern Miss 14 9,500 notes
21 January 1, 1955 Texas Western 47 Florida State 20 14,000 notes
22 January 2, 1956 Wyoming 21 Texas Tech 14 14,500 notes
23 January 1, 1957 George Washington 13 Texas Western 0 13,500 notes
24 January 1, 1958 Louisville 34 Drake 20 13,000 notes
25 December 31, 1958 Wyoming 14 Hardin–Simmons 6 13,000 notes
26 December 31, 1959 New Mexico A&M 28 North Texas 8 14,000 notes
27 December 31, 1960 New Mexico State 20 Utah State 13 16,000 notes
28 December 30, 1961 Villanova 17 Wichita 9 15,000 notes
29 December 31, 1962 West Texas State 15 Ohio 14 16,000 notes
30 December 31, 1963 Oregon 21 SMU 14 18,646 notes
31 December 26, 1964 Georgia 7 Texas Tech 0 23,292 notes
32 December 31, 1965 Texas Western 13 TCU 12 24,598 notes
33 December 24, 1966 Wyoming 28 Florida State 20 17,965 notes
34 December 30, 1967 UTEP 14 Mississippi 7 28,630 notes
35 December 28, 1968 Auburn 34 Arizona 10 27,062 notes
36 December 20, 1969 Nebraska 45 Georgia 6 26,668 notes
37 December 19, 1970 Georgia Tech 17 Texas Tech 9 26,188 notes
38 December 18, 1971 LSU 33 Iowa State 15 29,377 notes
39 December 30, 1972 North Carolina 32 Texas Tech 28 27,877 notes
40 December 29, 1973 Missouri 34 Auburn 17 26,108 notes
41 December 28, 1974 Mississippi State 26 North Carolina 24 26,035 notes
42 December 26, 1975 Pittsburgh 33 Kansas 19 29,910 notes
43 January 2, 1977 Texas A&M 37 Florida 14 31, 896 notes
44 December 31, 1977 Stanford 24 LSU 14 30,621 notes
45 December 23, 1978 Texas 42 Maryland 0 30,604 notes
46 December 22, 1979 Washington 14 Texas 7 30,124 notes
47 December 27, 1980 Nebraska 31 Mississippi State 17 31,332 notes
48 December 26, 1981 Oklahoma 40 Houston 14 29,985 notes
49 December 25, 1982 North Carolina 26 Texas 10 29,055 notes
50 December 24, 1983 Alabama 28 SMU 7 41,412 notes
51 December 22, 1984 Maryland 28 Tennessee 27 50,126 notes
52 December 28, 1985 Arizona 13 Georgia 13 50,203 notes
53 December 25, 1986 Alabama 28 Washington 6 48,722 notes
54 December 25, 1987 Oklahoma State 35 West Virginia 33 43,240 notes
55 December 24, 1988 Alabama 29 Army 28 43,661 notes
56 December 30, 1989 Pittsburgh 31 Texas A&M 28 44,887 notes
57 December 31, 1990 Michigan State 17 USC 16 50,562 notes
58 December 31, 1991 UCLA 6 Illinois 3 42,281 notes
59 December 31, 1992 Baylor 20 Arizona 15 41,622 notes
60 December 24, 1993 Oklahoma 41 Texas Tech 10 43,684 notes
61 December 30, 1994 Texas 35 North Carolina 31 50,612 notes
62 December 29, 1995 Iowa 38 Washington 18 49,116 notes
63 December 31, 1996 Stanford 38 Michigan State 0 42,721 notes
64 December 31, 1997 Arizona State 17 Iowa 7 49,104 notes
65 December 31, 1998 TCU 28 USC 19 46,612 notes
66 December 31, 1999 Oregon 24 Minnesota 20 48,757 notes
67 December 29, 2000 Wisconsin 21 UCLA 20 49,093 notes
68 December 31, 2001 Washington State 33 Purdue 27 47,812 notes
69 December 31, 2002 Purdue 34 Washington 24 48,917 notes
70 December 31, 2003 Minnesota 31 Oregon 30 49,864 notes
71 December 31, 2004 Arizona State 27 Purdue 23 51,288 notes
72 December 30, 2005 UCLA 50 Northwestern 38 50,426 notes
73 December 29, 2006 Oregon State 39 Missouri 38 48,732 notes
74 December 31, 2007 Oregon 56 South Florida 21 49,867 notes
75 December 31, 2008 Oregon State 3 Pittsburgh 0 49,037 notes
76 December 31, 2009 Oklahoma 31 Stanford 27 53,713 notes
77 December 31, 2010 Notre Dame 33 Miami (Florida) 17 54,021 notes
78 December 31, 2011 Utah 30 Georgia Tech 27 (OT) 48,123 notes
79 December 31, 2012 Georgia Tech 21 USC 7 47,922 notes
80 December 31, 2013 UCLA 42 Virginia Tech 12 47,912 notes
81 December 27, 2014 Arizona State 36 Duke 31 47,809 notes
82 December 26, 2015 Washington State 20 Miami (Florida) 14 41,180 notes
83 December 30, 2016 Stanford 25 North Carolina 23 42,166 notes
84 December 29, 2017 NC State 52 Arizona State 31 39,897 notes
85 December 31, 2018 Stanford 14 Pittsburgh 13 40,680 notes

Source: [12]:18
  The 1935 game was contested between high school teams.[3][4]

AwardsEdit

C.M. Hendricks Most Valuable Player TrophyEdit

Named after the first Sun Bowl Association president, Dr. C. M. Hendricks.[13]
Two players have been two-time MVPs; Charley Johnson (1959, 1960)[14] and Billy Stevens (1965, 1967).[15]

Source: [12]:26 [22]

Jimmy Rogers Jr. Most Valuable Lineman TrophyEdit

Named after former Sun Bowl president Jimmy Rogers Jr.[23]

Source: [12]:27 [22]

John Folmer Most Valuable Special Teams Player TrophyEdit

Named after former Sun Bowl president John Folmer.[26]

Source: [12]:27 [22]

Most appearancesEdit

Only teams with at least three appearances are listed.

Rank Team Appearances Won Lost Tied Win pct.
1 Texas Tech 9 1 8 0 .111
2 Texas Mines/Texas Western/UTEP 8 5 3 0 .625
3 Arizona State 6 3 2 1 .583
T4 Stanford 5 4 1 0 .800
T4 North Carolina 5 2 3 0 .400
T6 Oregon 4 3 1 0 .750
T6 UCLA 4 3 1 0 .750
T6 Pittsburgh 4 2 2 0 .500
T6 Texas 4 2 2 0 .500
T6 Hardin–Simmons 4 1 2 1 .375
T6 Washington 4 1 3 0 .250
T12 Alabama 3 3 0 0 1.000
T12 Oklahoma 3 3 0 0 1.000
T12 Wyoming 3 3 0 0 1.000
T12 New Mexico A&M/New Mexico State 3 2 0 1 .833
T12 Georgia Tech 3 2 1 0 .666
T12 West Virginia 3 2 1 0 .666
T12 Georgia 3 1 1 1 .500
T12 New Mexico 3 1 2 0 .333
T12 Purdue 3 1 2 0 .333
T12 Arizona 3 0 2 1 .167
T12 USC 3 0 3 0 .000

California and Colorado are the only current Pac-12 members to have never appeared in the Sun Bowl. Northern Arizona (now in the in FCS) is the only former member of the Border Conference to have never appeared in a Sun Bowl.

Appearances by conferenceEdit

Updated through the December 2018 edition (85 games, 170 total appearances).

Rank Conference Appearances Wins Losses Ties Win pct.
T1 Pac-12 30 18 11 1 .617
T1 Independents 30 17 11 2 .600
3 Border 21 8 11 2 .429
T4 SEC 15 7 7 1 .500
T4 ACC 15 5 10 0 .333
T4 SWC 15 4 11 0 .267
7 Big Ten 12 5 7 0 .417
8 Big Eight 8 6 2 0 .750
9 Mountain States 5 3 2 0 .600
T10 WAC 3 2 1 0 .667
T10 MVC 3 1 2 0 .333
T12 Texas Conference 2 2 0 0 1.000
T12 Big 12 2 1 1 0 .500
T12 Southern 2 1 1 0 .500
T12 High school teams 2 1 1 0 .500
T12 Big East 2 0 2 0 .000
T12 MAC 2 0 2 0 .000
18 Big Four (Ohio) 1 1 0 0 1.000
The first edition of the game, played in 1935, was contested between high school teams.
Records are based on teams' conferences at the time each game was played.
Pac-12 records include appearances by teams when the conference was the Pac-8 and Pac-10.

Game recordsEdit

Team Record, Team vs. Opponent Year
Most points scored (one team) 56, Oregon vs. South Florida 2007
Most points scored (both teams) 88, UCLA (50) vs. Northwestern (38) 2005
Most points scored (losing team) 38, Missouri vs. Oregon State 2006 (most recent)
Fewest points allowed 0, Oregon State vs. Pittsburgh 2008 (most recent)
Largest margin of victory 42, Texas (42) vs. Maryland (0) 1978
Total yards 561, Missouri vs. Oregon State 2006
Rushing yards 455, Mississippi State vs. North Carolina 1974
Passing yards 419, Purdue vs. Washington State 2001
First downs 33, Northwestern vs. UCLA 2005
Fewest yards allowed -21, Southwestern vs. UNAM 1945
Fewest rushing yards allowed -23, TCU vs. USC 1998
Fewest passing yards allowed -50, Southwestern vs. UNAM 1945
Individual Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
All-purpose yards 282, Jonathan Stewart, Oregon vs. South Florida
253 rush, 29 return
2007
Touchdowns (all-purpose) 4, shared by:
Thurman Thomas, Oklahoma State vs. West Virginia
Priest Holmes, Texas vs. North Carolina
Demario Richard, Arizona State vs. Duke
 
1987
1994
2014
Rushing yards 253, Jonathan Stewart, Oregon vs. South Florida 2007
Rushing touchdowns 4, shared by:
Thurman Thomas, Oklahoma State vs. West Virginia
Priest Holmes, Texas vs. North Carolina
 
1987
1994
Passing yards 419, Kyle Orton, Purdue vs. Washington 2002
Passing touchdowns 4, shared by:
Matt Moore, Oregon State vs. Missouri
Justin Roper, Oregon vs. South Florida
 
2006
2007
Receiving yards 200, Samie Parker, Oregon vs. Minnesota 2003
Receiving touchdowns 3, Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma vs. Stanford 2009
Tackles 24, Carl Zander, Tennessee vs. Maryland
14 solo, 10 assist
1984
Sacks 4.5, Reggie McKenzie, Tennessee vs. Maryland 1984
Interceptions 3, shared by:
Buddy McClinton, Auburn vs. Arizona
Harrison Smith, Notre Dame vs. Miami (FL)
 
1968
2010
Long Plays Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
Touchdown run 94, Hascall Henshaw, Arizona State vs. Western Reserve 1941
Touchdown pass 80, Brian Hare from Kyle Orton, Purdue vs. Arizona State 2004
Kickoff return 100, Peter Panuska, Tennessee vs. Maryland 1984
Punt return 82, Marcus Wall, North Carolina vs. Texas 1994
Interception return 91, Don "Skip" Hoovler, Ohio State vs. West Texas 1962
Fumble return
Punt 78, Scott Blanton, Oklahoma vs. Texas Tech 1993
Field goal 62, Tony Franklin, Texas A&M vs. Florida 1977
Miscellaneous Record, Teams Year
Largest attendance 54,021, Notre Dame vs. Miami (FL) 2010

Source: [12]:28–32

Future gamesEdit

Season Date scheduled Day
2019 December 31 Tuesday
2020 TBA

Source:[27]

Media coverageEdit

The Sun Bowl's contract with CBS Sports is the longest continuous relationship between a bowl game and one TV network,[28] spanning since 1968 and running through at least 2019. It is one of only two college football games on CBS that does not involve the Southeastern Conference (the other being the Army–Navy Game). Although every other year, CBS broadcasts the Notre Dame–Navy game when the latter is playing as the home team. As of 2017, the game is one of only five bowls that is not being carried by the ESPN family of networks - the Cure Bowl and Arizona Bowl are also under contract with CBS Sports and air on CBS Sports Network, while the Holiday Bowl and Foster Farms Bowl rights are held by Fox Sports.

The game traditionally kicks off at "High Noon" MST (2 p.m. EST). Before 2010, Helen of Troy also sponsored the halftime show, which featured such artists as Los Lonely Boys, The Village People, Baby Bash, David Archuleta, Rihanna, and Diamond Rio.[needs update]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "College Bowl Game Payouts". 6 September 2016.
  2. ^ "The Sun Bowl takes on Tony the Tiger as sponsor after agreement with Frosted Flakes". Retrieved August 20, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Ken Heineman - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  4. ^ a b c d http://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/football_records/2016/bowls.pdf
  5. ^ a b c "History - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  6. ^ "From the Sun Bowl Vault: A History of the Sun Bowl :: A History of the Sun Bowl". www.cstv.com.
  7. ^ "Felker directs late drive as Bulldogs win Sun Bowl". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. December 29, 1974. p. 1, sports.
  8. ^ "Grant Teaff - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  9. ^ "Adopting overtime has built 20 years of thrills into college football: An oral history".
  10. ^ "Hyundai title sponsors college football's Sun Bowl". SportsPro Media. Retrieved 2019-09-04.
  11. ^ Bedoya, Aaron A.; Bloomquist, Bret. "It's official: The Sun Bowl grabs 'Tony the Tiger' as a sponsor". El Paso Times. Retrieved 2019-09-04.
  12. ^ a b c d e "Sun Bowl Media Guide". sunbowl.org. 2018. Retrieved December 31, 2018 – via adobe.com.
  13. ^ "About - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  14. ^ a b c "Charley Johnson - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  15. ^ a b c "Bill Stevens - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  16. ^ "Jesse Whittenton - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  17. ^ "Tony Franklin - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  18. ^ "Cornelius Bennett - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  19. ^ "Thurman Thomas - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  20. ^ "Alex Van Pelt - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  21. ^ "Priest Holmes - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  22. ^ a b c "Stanford Claims Fourth Sun Bowl Victory". sunbowl.org. December 31, 2018. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  23. ^ "Jimmy Rogers, Jr. - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  24. ^ "Derrick Thomas - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  25. ^ "Blake Brockermeyer - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  26. ^ "John H. Folmer - Legends of the Sun Bowl - Hyundai Sun Bowl - December 29, 2017 - El Paso, Texas". www.sunbowl.org.
  27. ^ "2017 - 2019 Sun Bowl Dates Set". 93.1 KISS-FM.
  28. ^ "CBS Press Express - CBS SPORTS EXTENDS BRUT SUN BOWL BROADCAST AGREEMENT THROUGH 2009". www.cbspressexpress.com.

External linksEdit