Suleiman Abba

Suleiman Abba (born 22 March 1959) is a retired Nigerian police officer who served as the 17th Inspector General of Nigerian Police. He was appointed as acting IGP on 1 August 2014 by President Goodluck Jonathan[1] and later confirmed as substantive IGP on 4 November 2014.[2] Before the appointment, Abba was serving as the Assistant Inspector-General in Charge of Zone 7, Abuja.[3] IGP, Suleiman Abba was sacked[4] 21 April 2015 because of noticeable indiscipline in the Nigerian Police Force in the buildup to the 2015 general election

Suleiman Abba
17th Inspector General of Police
In office
1 August 2014 – 20 April 2015
Preceded byMohammed Dikko Abubakar
Succeeded bySolomon Arase
Personal details
Born22 March 1959
Gwaram, Jigawa State, Nigeria
Alma mater
OccupationPolice Officer

Life and careerEdit

Abba was born on 22 March 1959 in Gwaram of Jigawa State Northwestern Nigeria. He obtained B.A degree in History from University of Jos,[5]

He was recruited into the Nigerian police in December, 1984 and rose through ranks to become AIG in February 2012.[1]

Abba has worked in various capacities while in Police service. He served as Commissioner of Police in Lagos and Rivers States and was at one time, Assistant Inspector-General of Police in charge of Zone 7 Abuja. He also once served as Aide-De-Camp (ADC) to Maryam Abacha, spouse of Nigeria's former military leader, Sani Abacha.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Premium Times. "Jonathan appoints Abba acting IGP". Retrieved 28 April 2015.
  2. ^ Funmi, Falobi (5 November 2014). "Nigeria: As Suleiman Abba Becomes IG". Daily Independent (via AllAfrica.com). Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  3. ^ "Nigeria Appoints Suleiman Abba As New Police C". Sahara Reporters. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  4. ^ "Meet Nigeria's new Inspector General of Police, Solomon Arase | Premium Times Nigeria". 21 April 2015. Retrieved 17 March 2022.
  5. ^ "IGP Sulaiman Abba (rtd), Chairman, Board of Directors". NPF Pensions. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  6. ^ Seun Akioye. "Suleiman Abba: A profile in controversy". The Nation. Retrieved 19 February 2018.