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Solar cars in Boulder

Solar power in Colorado has grown rapidly, partly because of one of the most favorable net metering laws in the country, with no limit on the number of users.[1][2] The state was the first in the nation to establish a Renewable Portfolio Standard for its electric utilities.[3]

Colorado consumers typically obtain varying amounts of solar power from rooftop solar, community solar gardens, and larger solar farms. Colorado is home to many solar installers which are ranked annually by the amount of power installed.[4] Several thousand people are employed in solar-energy-related activities throughout the state.[3] A few companies have attempted to establish solar panel manufacturing operations in Colorado: including Abound Solar, Ascent Solar, and Primestar Solar.[5] Colorado was the first state where Dow introduced some of the earliest solar shingles.[6]

The Colorado Solar Energy Industries Association (COSEIA), a state affiliate of the national non-profit Solar Energy Industries Association, supports solar use and industry growth through its efforts which include both business and residential consumer education.[7] The Interstate Renewable Energy Council is also a source for information on consumer protection, workforce development, and for other news affecting industry developments in the state.[8]

Colorado's colleges and universities support educational and research programs in solar power science and technology,[9][10] and in the related interdisciplinary subjects of energy, environment, and sustainability.[11][12] Golden, Colorado is home to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and to the Golden Field Office of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, both of which are funded by the United States Department of Energy.


Solar farmsEdit

The following list emphasizes operating solar photovoltaic farms in Colorado that are 10 MW or larger.
To update and expand this list, search the Energy Information Administration's plant-level data set by visiting the Electrity Data Browser.
Alternatively, view the Solar Industry Association's Major Solar Projects List which is less frequently updated.

Name Location Coordinates Capacity
(MWAC)
Year
Completed
Refs
Comanche Solar Project Pueblo County 38°12′19″N 104°34′00″W / 38.20528°N 104.56667°W / 38.20528; -104.56667 (Comanche Solar) 120 2016 [13]
Hooper Solar PV Power Plant Alamosa County 37°41′32″N 105°58′54″W / 37.69222°N 105.98167°W / 37.69222; -105.98167 (Hooper Solar) 50 2015 [14]
Rawhide Flats Bison Solar Plant Larimer County 40°51′38″N 105°00′38″W / 40.86056°N 105.01056°W / 40.86056; -105.01056 (Rawhide Flats Bison Solar) 30 2016 [15]
San Isabel Solar Energy Center Las Animas County 37°22′03″N 104°28′04″W / 37.36750°N 104.46778°W / 37.36750; -104.46778 (San Isabel Solar Project) 30 2016 [16] [17]
Alamosa Solar Generating Project Alamosa County 37°35′54″N 105°57′07″W / 37.59833°N 105.95194°W / 37.59833; -105.95194 (Alamosa CPV Solar) 30 2012 [18]
San Luis Valley Solar Ranch Alamosa County 37°41′03″N 105°53′13″W / 37.68417°N 105.88694°W / 37.68417; -105.88694 (San Luis Valley Solar) 30 2011 [19]
Greater Sandhill Solar Plant Alamosa County 37°41′08″N 105°53′27″W / 37.68556°N 105.89083°W / 37.68556; -105.89083 (Greater Sandhill Solar) 19 2010 [20]
SR Platte Rattlesnake Solar Farm Weld County 40°10′54″N 104°41′31″W / 40.18167°N 104.69194°W / 40.18167; -104.69194 (SR Rattlesnake Solar) 16 2017 [21][22]
SR Fort Lupton Solar Farm Weld County 40°04′53″N 104°44′48″W / 40.08139°N 104.74667°W / 40.08139; -104.74667 (Fort Lupton Solar) 13 2016 [23][24]
Victory Solar Facility Adams County 39°47′42″N 104°25′59″W / 39.79500°N 104.43306°W / 39.79500; -104.43306 (Victory Solar) 13 2016 [25]
Clear Spring Ranch Solar Array El Paso County 38°36′08″N 104°41′41″W / 38.60222°N 104.69472°W / 38.60222; -104.69472 (Clear Spring Solar) 10 2016 [26]
Denver Int'l Airport Solar Project Denver County 39°54′00″N 104°40′24″W / 39.90000°N 104.67333°W / 39.90000; -104.67333 (DIA Solar) 8.3 2014 10MWDC[27]
Alamosa Photovoltaic Power Plant Alamosa County 37°41′25″N 105°52′40″W / 37.69028°N 105.87778°W / 37.69028; -105.87778 (Alamosa PV Plant) 7.7 2007 [28]
SR Mavericks Solar Farm Weld County 40°13′48″N 105°01′48″W / 40.23000°N 105.03000°W / 40.23000; -105.03000 (SR Mavericks Solar) 6.5 2016 [29][30]
SR Skylark Solar Farm (A&B) El Paso County 40°34′40″N 104°53′41″W / 40.57778°N 104.89472°W / 40.57778; -104.89472 (Skylark Solar) 6 2016 [31]
Air Force Academy Solar Farm El Paso County 38°57′24″N 104°48′23″W / 38.95667°N 104.80639°W / 38.95667; -104.80639 (AFA Solar) 5.5 2011
Colorado State Univ. Solar Farm Larimer County 40°35′32″N 105°08′50″W / 40.59222°N 105.14722°W / 40.59222; -105.14722 (CSU Solar) 5 2010
Valley View Solar Farm Weld County 40°25′08″N 104°53′31″W / 40.41889°N 104.89194°W / 40.41889; -104.89194 (Valley View Solar) 4 2015 [32]
SR Kersey Platte Valley Solar Farm Weld County 40°23′10″N 104°33′03″W / 40.38611°N 104.55083°W / 40.38611; -104.55083 (Kersey Solar) 3.5 2017 [33][34]
Fort Carson Army Base Solar Farm El Paso County 38°41′15″N 104°46′55″W / 38.68750°N 104.78194°W / 38.68750; -104.78194 (Fort Carson Solar) 2 2010
Rifle Energy Innovation Plant Garfield County 39°31′23″N 107°48′48″W / 39.52306°N 107.81333°W / 39.52306; -107.81333 (Rifle Solar) 2 2009
Garfield Airport Solar Array Garfield County 39°31′29″N 107°40′20″W / 39.52472°N 107.67222°W / 39.52472; -107.67222 (Garfield Solar) 0.858
CRMS Solar Farm Garfield County 39°24′36″N 107°13′32″W / 39.41000°N 107.22556°W / 39.41000; -107.22556 (CRMS Solar) 0.147 [35][36]

Installed capacityEdit

Colorado Solar Capacity (MWp)[37][38][39][40][41][42]
Year Photovoltaics CSP
Capacity Installed % Change Capacity Installed % Change
2007 14.6 11.5 371%
2008 35.7 21.7 145%
2009 59.1 23.4 66%
2010 121.1 62.0 105% 1 1
2011 196.7 75.5 62% 2.4 1.4
2012 299.6 102.9 52% 31.8 29.4
2013 360.4 58.0 19% 31.8 0
2014 400 67 20% 31.8 0
2015 544 144 36% 31.8 0
2016 921 377 69% 31.8 0
2017 1019 98 11% 31.8 0

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "A Landmark Settlement in Colorado Over Solar Grid Fees: 'This Could Be a Model'". greentechmedia.com. August 16, 2016. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  2. ^ "How does net metering work in Colorado". reenergizeco.com. June 7, 2018. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  3. ^ a b "State of Colorado, Energy Office, Renewable Energy Standard". colorado.gov. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  4. ^ Solar Power World, 2018 Top Colorado Contractors
  5. ^ "First Solar Acquires GE's Primestar Solar IP". greentechmedia.com. August 6, 2013. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  6. ^ "DOW Brings the Revolutionary DOW POWERHOUSE™ Solar Shingle to U.S. Markets". businesswire.com. October 4, 2011.
  7. ^ Colorado Solar Industries Association website
  8. ^ "Interstate Renewable Energy Council - Colorado". irecusa.org. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  9. ^ "CSU Sustainability Initiative - Solar Energy Research". colostate.edu. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  10. ^ "CU Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute". colorado.edu. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  11. ^ "UNC Environmental and Sustainability Studies". unco.edu. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  12. ^ "CU Sustainability, Energy, and Environment Community". colorado.edu. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  13. ^ "Community Energy's 120 MW Comanche Solar Project Provides Bulk of Solar Power in Approved Xcel Energy Resource Plan". communityenergysolar.com. March 4, 2014.
  14. ^ Colorado gets massive boost in solar power capacity, Denver Business Journal, Dec 23, 2015
  15. ^ Bison Solar
  16. ^ "Juwi Portfolio - San Isabel". juwiamericas.com. Retrieved February 14, 2019.
  17. ^ "Our portfolio". NESCO. 2017. Retrieved 2019-02-14. The 37.5 Megawatt (MW) DC began construction in May of 2016 and achieved substantial completion in November of 2016.
  18. ^ Wesoff, Eric (May 15, 2012). "Biggest CPV Plant in US Now on the Grid at Alamosa". Greentech Media. Retrieved 2019-01-29.
  19. ^ San Luis Valley Solar Ranch Fact Sheet - archived
  20. ^ "Solar Technology Helps Xcel Energy Meet Colorado's Renewable Energy Standard". Sunpower. Retrieved February 16, 2019.
  21. ^ Platte Solar
  22. ^ Rattlesnake
  23. ^ Fort Lupton Solar
  24. ^ SR Fort Lupton Solar
  25. ^ Victory Solar
  26. ^ Clear Spring Solar
  27. ^ Fourth Solar Array Opens at Denver International Airport June 18, 2014
  28. ^ Raabe, Steve (24 December 2008). "Alamosa solar plant's success helps prove resource's viability on large scale". The Denver Post. Archived from the original on 29 January 2009. Retrieved 13 January 2009.
  29. ^ Mavericks Solar
  30. ^ SR Mavericks Solar
  31. ^ Skylark Solar
  32. ^ Valley View Solar
  33. ^ Kersey Solar
  34. ^ Platte Valley Solar
  35. ^ CRMS Solar Farm
  36. ^ Major Solar Projects
  37. ^ Sherwood, Larry (August 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2011" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-09-06. Retrieved 2012-08-16.
  38. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2010). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2009" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 23. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-09-25. Retrieved 2012-07-12.
  39. ^ Sherwood, Larry (June 2011). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2010" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 20. Retrieved 2011-06-29.
  40. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2012). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2012" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). p. 16. Retrieved 2013-10-11.
  41. ^ Sherwood, Larry (July 2014). "U.S. Solar Market Trends 2013" (PDF). Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Retrieved 2014-09-26.
  42. ^ "SEIA Colorado Solar". Solar Energy Industries Association. December 2018. Retrieved 2019-02-23.

External linksEdit