Solar eclipse of July 1, 2076

A partial solar eclipse will occur on Wednesday, July 1, 2076. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A partial solar eclipse occurs in the polar regions of the Earth when the center of the Moon's shadow misses the Earth.

Solar eclipse of July 1, 2076
SE2076Jul01P.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NaturePartial
Gamma1.4005
Magnitude0.2746
Maximum eclipse
Coordinates67°00′N 98°06′W / 67°N 98.1°W / 67; -98.1
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse6:50:43
References
Saros157 (2 of 70)
Catalog # (SE5000)9678

Related eclipsesEdit

Solar eclipses 2073–2076Edit

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

122 February 7, 2073
 
Partial
127 August 3, 2073
 
Total
132 January 27, 2074
 
Annular
137 July 24, 2074
 
Annular
142 January 16, 2075
 
Total
147 July 13, 2075
 
Annular
152 January 6, 2076
 
Total
157 July 1, 2076
 
Partial

Metonic seriesEdit

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

21 eclipse events, progressing from south to north between July 1, 2000 and July 1, 2076
July 1–2 April 19–20 February 5–7 November 24–25 September 12–13
117 119 121 123 125
 
July 1, 2000
 
April 19, 2004
 
February 7, 2008
 
November 25, 2011
 
September 13, 2015
127 129 131 133 135
 
July 2, 2019
 
April 20, 2023
 
February 6, 2027
 
November 25, 2030
 
September 12, 2034
137 139 141 143 145
 
July 2, 2038
 
April 20, 2042
 
February 5, 2046
 
November 25, 2049
 
September 12, 2053
147 149 151 153 155
 
July 1, 2057
 
April 20, 2061
 
February 5, 2065
 
November 24, 2068
 
September 12, 2072
157 159 161 163 165
 
July 1, 2076

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.

External linksEdit