Solar eclipse of September 12, 2072

A total solar eclipse will occur on Monday, September 12, 2072. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometres wide.

Solar eclipse of September 12, 2072
SE2072Sep12T.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NatureTotal
Gamma0.9655
Magnitude1.0558
Maximum eclipse
Duration193 sec (3 m 13 s)
Coordinates69°48′N 102°00′E / 69.8°N 102°E / 69.8; 102
Max. width of band732 km (455 mi)
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse8:59:20
References
Saros155 (9 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000)9670

This is the first of 55 central eclipses of Solar Saros 155. The first will be in 2072 and the last will be in 3046. This is the first of 56 umbral eclipses of Solar Saros 155. The first will be in 2072 and the last will be in 3064.

The total phase of eclipse will be only in Siberia in Russia. Large cities, in which the total phase will be seen, include Yakutsk, Neryungri, Mirny in Sakha Republic and Khatanga in Krasnoyarsk Krai (also Norilsk will have 98% sun obscuration). As a partial, the eclipse will seen mostly in Europe (except for south of Europe), mostly in Asia and on the east of Greenland.

Related eclipsesEdit

Solar eclipses 2069–2072Edit

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

120 April 21, 2069
 
Partial
125 October 15, 2069
 
Partial
130 April 11, 2070
 
Total
135 October 4, 2070
 
Annular
140 March 31, 2071
 
Annular
145 September 23, 2071
 
Total
150 March 19, 2072
 
Partial
155 September 12, 2072
 
Total

Saros 155 seriesEdit

It is a part of Saros cycle 155, repeating every 18 years, 11 days (223 synodic months), contains 71 events. The series started with a partial solar eclipse on June 17, 1928. It has total eclipses from September 12, 2072 to August 30, 2649. The series also has 3 hybrid eclipses from September 10, 2667 to October 3, 2703 and 20 annular eclipses from October 13, 2721 to May 8, 3064.

The series ends at member 71 as a partial eclipse on July 24, 3190. The longest total eclipses will be on October 26, 2144 and on November 7, 2162, at 4 minutes and 5 seconds.[2]

Series members 1–10 occur between 1901 and 2100:
1 2 3
 
June 17, 1928
 
June 29, 1946
 
July 9, 1964
4 5 6
 
July 20, 1982
 
July 31, 2000
 
August 11, 2018
7 8 9
 
August 21, 2036
 
September 2, 2054
 
September 12, 2072
10
 
September 23, 2090

Metonic seriesEdit

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

21 eclipse events, progressing from south to north between July 1, 2000 and July 1, 2076
July 1–2 April 19–20 February 5–7 November 24–25 September 12–13
117 119 121 123 125
 
July 1, 2000
 
April 19, 2004
 
February 7, 2008
 
November 25, 2011
 
September 13, 2015
127 129 131 133 135
 
July 2, 2019
 
April 20, 2023
 
February 6, 2027
 
November 25, 2030
 
September 12, 2034
137 139 141 143 145
 
July 2, 2038
 
April 20, 2042
 
February 5, 2046
 
November 25, 2049
 
September 12, 2053
147 149 151 153 155
 
July 1, 2057
 
April 20, 2061
 
February 5, 2065
 
November 24, 2068
 
September 12, 2072
157 159 161 163 165
 
July 1, 2076

NotesEdit

  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  2. ^ Saros Series Catalog of Solar Eclipses NASA Eclipse Web Site.

ReferencesEdit