Solar eclipse of April 19, 2004

A partial solar eclipse took place on 19 April 2004. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A partial solar eclipse occurs in the polar regions of the Earth when the center of the Moon's shadow misses the Earth. It was largely visible over the south Atlantic Ocean and north shores of Antarctica, most prominently the Antarctic Peninsula.

Solar eclipse of April 19, 2004
SE2004Apr19P.png
Map
Type of eclipse
NaturePartial
Gamma-1.1335
Magnitude0.7367
Maximum eclipse
Coordinates61°36′S 44°18′E / 61.6°S 44.3°E / -61.6; 44.3
Times (UTC)
Greatest eclipse13:35:05
References
Saros119 (65 of 71)
Catalog # (SE5000)9517

The eclipse can also be seen in the southern Africa at sunset. Considering the magnitude and the solar altitude, South Africa is the best place to observe this eclipse. In Cape Town, the sun was about 40% obscured, while in Pretoria the sun was 29% obscured. Further north, the eclipse remained visible up to Angola, southern DR Congo and Tanzania.

ImagesEdit

 
Animated eclipse path

Related eclipsesEdit

Eclipses of 2004Edit

Solar eclipses 2004–2007Edit

This eclipse is a member of a semester series. An eclipse in a semester series of solar eclipses repeats approximately every 177 days and 4 hours (a semester) at alternating nodes of the Moon's orbit.[1]

Solar eclipse series sets from 2004–2007
Ascending node   Descending node
Saros Map Gamma Saros Map Gamma
119 2004 April 19
 
Partial (south)
-1.13345 124 2004 October 14
 
Partial (north)
1.03481
129
 
Partial from Naiguatá
2005 April 8
 
Hybrid
-0.34733 134
 
Annular from Madrid, Spain
2005 October 3
 
Annular
0.33058
139
 
Total from Side, Turkey
2006 March 29
 
Total
0.38433 144
 
Partial from São Paulo, Brazil
2006 September 22
 
Annular
-0.40624
149
 
From Jaipur, India
2007 March 19
 
Partial (north)
1.07277 154
 
From Córdoba, Argentina
2007 September 11
 
Partial (south)
-1.12552

Saros 119Edit

It is a part of Saros cycle 119, repeating every 18 years, 11 days, containing 71 events. The series started with partial solar eclipse on May 15, 850 AD. It contains total eclipses on August 9, 994 AD and August 20, 1012 with a hybrid eclipse on August 31, 1030. It has annular eclipses from September 10, 1048 through March 18, 1950. The series ends at member 71 as a partial eclipse on June 24, 2112. The longest duration of totality was only 32 seconds on August 20, 1012. The longest duration of annularity was 7 minutes, 37 seconds on September 1, 1625. The longest duration of hybridity was only 18 seconds on August 31, 1030.

Metonic seriesEdit

The metonic series repeats eclipses every 19 years (6939.69 days), lasting about 5 cycles. Eclipses occur in nearly the same calendar date. In addition, the octon subseries repeats 1/5 of that or every 3.8 years (1387.94 days). All eclipses in this table occur at the Moon's ascending node.

21 eclipse events, progressing from south to north between July 1, 2000 and July 1, 2076
July 1–2 April 19–20 February 5–7 November 24–25 September 12–13
117 119 121 123 125
 
July 1, 2000
 
April 19, 2004
 
February 7, 2008
 
November 25, 2011
 
September 13, 2015
127 129 131 133 135
 
July 2, 2019
 
April 20, 2023
 
February 6, 2027
 
November 25, 2030
 
September 12, 2034
137 139 141 143 145
 
July 2, 2038
 
April 20, 2042
 
February 5, 2046
 
November 25, 2049
 
September 12, 2053
147 149 151 153 155
 
July 1, 2057
 
April 20, 2061
 
February 5, 2065
 
November 24, 2068
 
September 12, 2072
157 159 161 163 165
 
July 1, 2076

External linksEdit

  1. ^ van Gent, R.H. "Solar- and Lunar-Eclipse Predictions from Antiquity to the Present". A Catalogue of Eclipse Cycles. Utrecht University. Retrieved 6 October 2018.