Shooting at the 2008 Summer Olympics – Men's 25 metre rapid fire pistol

The men's ISSF 25 meter rapid fire pistol event at the 2008 Olympic Games took place on August 15 and 16 at the Beijing Shooting Range Hall. There were 19 competitors from 14 nations.[1] The event was won by Oleksandr Petriv of Ukraine, the nation's first medal in the event. Germany took silver (Ralf Schumann) and bronze (Christian Reitz). It was Schumann's fifth and final Olympic medal in the event; with three golds and two silvers, he was individually more successful than any nation other than Germany. After rule changes, new Olympic records were established by Keith Sanderson (qualification round) and Petriv (final).

Men's 25 metre rapid fire pistol
at the Games of the XXIX Olympiad
2008 Beijing Shooting Range CTF.JPG
Beijing Shooting Range
VenueBeijing Shooting Range Hall
DateAugust 15, 2008
August 16, 2008
Competitors19 from 14 nations
Winning score780.2 OR
Medalists
1st place, gold medalist(s) Oleksandr Petriv
 Ukraine
2nd place, silver medalist(s) Ralf Schumann
 Germany
3rd place, bronze medalist(s) Christian Reitz
 Germany
← 2004
2012 →

BackgroundEdit

This was the 23rd appearance of what had been standardised in 1948 as the men's ISSF 25 meter rapid fire pistol event, the only event on the 2020 programme that traces back to 1896.[1] The event has been held at every Summer Olympics except 1904 and 1928 (when no shooting events were held) and 1908; it was nominally open to women from 1968 to 1980, although very few women participated these years.[2] The first five events were quite different, with some level of consistency finally beginning with the 1932 event—which, though it had differences from the 1924 competition, was roughly similar. The 1936 competition followed the 1932 one quite closely.[3] The post-World War II event substantially altered the competition once again.[4] The 1984 Games introduced women's-only shooting events, including the ISSF 25 meter pistol (though this is more similar to the non-Olympic men's ISSF 25 meter center-fire pistol than the rapid fire pistol).

Two of the six finalists from 2004 returned: gold medalist (and 1992 and 1996 gold and 1988 silver medalist) Ralf Schumann of Germany and fifth-place finisher (and 2000 bronze medalist) Iulian Raicea of Romania. The 2006 world champion and runner-up were both from China: Zhang Penghui and Liu Zhongsheng. Schumann was favored once again.[1]

The Czech Republic made its debut in the event. The United States made its 19th appearance, most of any nation.

QualificationEdit

Each National Olympic Committee (NOC) could enter up to two shooters if the NOC earned enough quota sports or had enough crossover-qualified shooters. To compete, a shooter needed a quota spot and to achieve a Minimum Qualification Score (MQS). Once a shooter was using a quota spot in any shooting event, they could enter any other shooting event for which they had achieved the MQS as well (a crossover qualification). There were 18 quota spots used for the rapid fire pistol: 1 for the host nation, 4 at the 2006 World Cup events, 2 at the 2006 World Championship, 4 at the 2007 World Cup events, 1 each at the 2007 European Championships, 2007 Pan American Games, 2007 Oceania Championships, and 2008 Asian Championships, and 3 re-allocated places. In 2008, one crossover qualification was used in the rapid fire pistol: Júlio Almeida of Brazil had qualified and used a quota spot in the 10 metre air pistol and also achieved the rapid fire pistol MQS; he competed in both events (as well as the 50 metre pistol).

Competition formatEdit

The competition format continued to use the two-round (qualifying round and final) format, as in 1988 and since 1996, with a change to the format of the final to increase the number of shots. The 2005 rules changes also required the pistols used to be sport pistols, banning .22 Short cartridges.

The qualifying round from 1988 onward was essentially the same as the full competition format from 1948–1984. Each shooter fired 60 shots. These were done in two courses of 30; each course consisted of two stages of 15; each stage consisted of three series of 5. In each stage, the time limit for each series was 8 seconds for the first, 6 seconds for the second, and 4 seconds for the third.

The 1988 tournament had added a two-series final for the top eight shooters; the 1992 competition broke that down to a four-series semifinal for the top eight and two-series final for the top four. In 1996 and 2000, the top eight once again advanced to the final. The 2004 version had reduced the number of finalists to six, where it stayed in 2008.

In the final, each shooter fired four five-shot series at 4 seconds. Scoring in the final was to 1/10 of a point, with each shot worth up to 10.9 points (for a final round maximum of 218, and total maximum of 818).

The 1992 competition had introduced round targets rather than the silhouettes used from 1948 to 1988 as well as many pre-World War II versions of the event. Score, rather than hits, had been used as the primary ranking method since 1960.[1][5]

RecordsEdit

Prior to this competition, the existing world and Olympic records were as follows.

Qualifying records
World record   Alexei Klimov (RUS)
  Christian Reitz (GER)
591 Granada, Spain
Milan, Italy
6 October 2006
28 May 2008
Olympic record ISSF Rule changed on 01.01.2005
Final records
World record   Christian Reitz (GER) 794.0 (591+203.0) Milan, Italy 28 May 2008
Olympic record ISSF Rule changed on 01.01.2005

ScheduleEdit

Date Time Round
Friday, 15 August 2008 13:00 Qualifying: Course 1
Saturday, 16 August 2008 9:00
12:00
Qualifying: Course 2
Final

ResultsEdit

QualifyingEdit

The first stage began at 13:00 China Standard Time (UTC+8) on Friday. The second stage began at 09:00 on Saturday.

Rank Shooter Nation Course 1 Course 2 Total Notes
8 seconds 6 seconds 4 seconds Total 8 seconds 6 seconds 4 seconds Total
1 Keith Sanderson   United States 97 98 94 289 99 99 96 294 583 Q, OR
2 Leonid Yekimov   Russia 99 95 97 291 99 96 95 290 581 Q
3 Roman Bondaruk   Ukraine 96 94 96 286 100 97 97 294 580 Q
4 Oleksandr Petriv   Ukraine 96 99 94 289 98 96 97 291 580 Q
5 Ralf Schumann   Germany 97 99 92 288 99 97 95 291 579 Q
6 Christian Reitz   Germany 97 100 92 289 99 97 94 290 579 Q
7 Leuris Pupo   Cuba 96 97 95 288 97 96 97 290 578
8 Aleksey Klimov   Russia 99 99 90 288 95 96 98 289 577
9 Iulian Raicea   Romania 99 95 93 287 99 95 95 289 576
10 Liu Zhongsheng   China 96 95 90 281 98 96 97 291 572 2 points deducted (45° rule violation)
11 Júlio Almeida   Brazil 98 96 90 284 98 100 86 284 568
12 Ghenadie Lisoconi   Moldova 95 96 91 282 93 95 97 285 567
13 Afanasijs Kuzmins   Latvia 95 92 90 277 98 96 94 288 565
14 Martin Podhráský   Czech Republic 92 98 86 276 99 98 92 289 565
15 Hasli Izwan Amir Hasan   Malaysia 96 95 88 279 95 95 85 285 564
16 Martin Strnad   Czech Republic 96 94 77 267 99 99 97 295 562
17 Bruce Quick   Australia 94 97 89 280 95 95 90 280 560
18 Wong Fai   Hong Kong 96 97 89 282 98 92 86 276 558
19 Zhang Penghui   China 96 100 92 288 DSQ Repeated 45° rule violation

FinalEdit

Rank Shooter Nation Qualifying Final Total Notes
Series 1 Series 2 Series 3 Series 4 Total
  Oleksandr Petriv   Ukraine 580 50.8 50.2 48.4 50.8 200.2 780.2 OR
  Ralf Schumann   Germany 579 49.2 49.5 50.2 51.6 200.5 779.5
  Christian Reitz   Germany 579 50.8 49.1 52.4 48.0 200.3 779.3
4 Leonid Yekimov   Russia 581 46.6 50.9 51.0 48.7 197.2 778.2
5 Keith Sanderson   United States 583 48.6 48.0 47.5 49.5 193.6 776.6
6 Roman Bondaruk   Ukraine 580 49.4 49.6 49.0 46.7 194.7 774.7

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Rapid-Fire Pistol, 25 metres, Men's". Olympedia. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  2. ^ "Muzzle-Loading Pistol, 25 metres, Men (1896)". Olympedia. Retrieved 11 December 2020.
  3. ^ "Rapid-Fire Pistol, 25 metres, Men (1936)". Olympedia. Retrieved 11 December 2020.
  4. ^ "Rapid-Fire Pistol, 25 metres, Men (1948)". Olympedia. Retrieved 11 December 2020.
  5. ^ "Pistol". The Washington Post. Retrieved 14 December 2020.