Shimabara Domain

The Shimabara Domain (島原藩, Shimabara-han) was a Japanese domain of the Edo period. It is associated with Hizen Province in modern-day Saga Prefecture.[1]

Shimabara Domain
(1618–1871)
島原藩

Hinoe Domain
(1600–1618)
日野江藩
Domain of Japan
1600–1614
1614–1871
CapitalHinoe Castle (1600–1618)
Shimabara Castle (1618–1871)
 • TypeDaimyō
Historical eraEdo period
• Established
1600
• Disestablished
1871
Today part ofNagasaki Prefecture
Shimabara Castle

In the han system, Shimabara was a political and economic abstraction based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[2] In other words, the domain was defined in terms of kokudaka, not land area.[3] This was different than the feudalism of the West.

HistoryEdit

The Arima clan, who were Kirishitan daimyōs, ruled over Shimabara Domain in the late Muromachi period from Hinoe Castle and Hara Castle. In 1614, the Tokugawa Bakufu banned Christianity and replaced Arima Naozumi with Matsukura Shigemasa. Matsukura, who strictly enforced the prohibition against Christianity with mass executions, also severely raised taxes to pay for the construction of his new Shimabara Castle from 1618 to 1624. This oppression of the peasants was a major factor leading to the Shimabara Rebellion.[4]

After the rebellion was suppressed, the domain was given to the Kōriki clan. It then passed to the Fukōzu-Matsudaira family, who ruled it from 1669 until 1871 (with a brief hiatus from 1749 to 1774, during which the domain was ruled by the Toda clan, cousins of the Fukōzu-Matsudaira).

In the Bakumatsu period, Matsudaira Tadachika became an influential official in the Tokugawa administration. However, the final daimyō of Shimabara, Matsudaira Tadakazu pledged Shimabara domain in support of Emperor Meiji in the Boshin War, proved his loyalty by committing his troops to the northern campaign against the Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei, fighting at Akita and Morioka.

List of daimyōsEdit

The hereditary daimyōs were head of the clan and head of the domain.

Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank Revenue
1 Arima Harunobu (有馬晴信) 1600–1612 Shūri-daiyū (修理大夫) Lower 5th (従五位下) 40,000 koku
2 Arima Naozumi[5] (有馬直純) 1612–1614 Saiemonfu (左衛門佐) Lower 5th (従五位下) 40,000 koku
Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank Revenue
1 Matsukura Shigemasa (松倉重政) 1616–1630 Bungo-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 40,000 koku
2 Matsukura Katsuie (松倉勝家) 1630–1638 Nagato-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 40,000 koku
Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank Revenue
1 Kōriki Tadafusa (高力忠房) 1638–1655 Sakontaiyu (左近大夫) Lower 5th (従五位下) 40,000 koku
2 Kōriki Takanaga (高力高長(隆長)) 1655–1668 Sakontaiyu (左近大夫) Lower 5th (従五位下) 40,000 koku
Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank Revenue
1 Matsudaira Tadafusa (松平忠房) 1669–1698 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 4th (従四位下) 65,000 koku
2 Matsudaira Tadakatsu (松平忠雄) 1698–1735 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 4th (従四位下) 65,000 koku
3 Matsudaira Tadami (松平忠俔) 1735–1738 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
4 Matsudaira Tadatoki (松平忠刻) 1738–1749 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 4th (従四位下) 65,000 koku
5 Matsudaira Tadamasa (松平忠祗) 1749 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 4th (従四位下) 65,000 koku
Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank Revenue
1 Toda Tadamitsu (戸田忠盈) 1749–1754 Hyuga-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 77,000 koku
2 Toda Tadatō (戸田忠寛) 1754–1774 Iki-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 77,000 koku
Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank Revenue
1 Matsudaira Tadahiro (松平忠恕) 1774–1792 Yamato-no-kami Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
2 Matsudaira Tadayori (松平忠馮) 1792–1819 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
3 Matsudaira Tadayoshi (松平忠侯) 1819–1840 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
4 Matsudaira Tadanari (松平忠誠) 1840–1847 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
5 Matsudaira Tadakiyo (松平忠精) 1847–1859 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
6 Matsudaira Tadaatsu (松平忠淳) 1859–1860 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
7 Matsudaira Tadachika (松平忠愛) 1860–1862 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku
8 Matsudaira Tadakazu (松平忠和) 1862–1871 Tonomori-no-tsukasa (主殿頭) Lower 5th (従五位下) 65,000 koku

Simplified genealogy (Matsudaira-Fukōzu)Edit

  • Matsudaira Naomitsu, 3rd head of the Matsudaira (c. c. 1400c. 1488–89)
    • Chikatada, 4th head of the Matsudaira (c. 1431–1531)
      • Nagachika, 5th head of the Matsudaira (1473–1544)
        • Nobutada, 6th head of the Matsudaira (1490–1531)
          • Kiyoyasu, 7th head of the Matsudaira (1511–1536)
            • Usui-hime, m. Sakai Tadatsugu (1527–1596)
              • Ogasawara Nobuyuki, 1st daimyō of Koga (1570–1614)
                • daughter, (m.?) Mizuno Tadasada
                  • daughter, m. Tsuchiya Kazunao, 1st daimyō of Tsuchiura (1608–1679)
                    • Tsuchiya Masanao, 2nd daimyō of Tsuchiura (1641–1722)
                      • Tsuchiya Nobunao, 3rd daimyō of Tsuchiura (1696–1734)
                        • daughter, m.   IV. Matsudaira Tadatoki, 4th daimyō of Shimabara (1st creation) (1716–1749; r. 1738–1749).
                          •   V. Tadamasa, 5th daimyō of Shimabara (1st creation) (c. 1737–38 – 1801; r. 1749)
                          •   I. Tadahiro, 1st daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation, cr. 1774) (c. 1740–42 – 1792; r. 1774–1792)
                            •   II. Tadayori, 2nd daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation) (1771–1819; r. 1792–1819)
                              •   III. Tadayoshi, 3rd daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation) (1799–1840; r. 1819–1840)
                                •   IV. Tadanari, 4th daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation) (1824–1847; r. 1840–1847)
                                •   V. Tadakiyo, 5th daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation) (1832–1859; r. 1847–1859)
                              • Tadaatsu
                                •   VII. Tadachika, 7th daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation) (1845–1862; r. 1860–1862)
            • Hirotada, 8th head of the Matsudaira (1526–1549)
              •   Tokugawa Ieyasu, 1st Tokugawa shōgun (1543–1616; r. 1603–1605)
                • Matsudaira Nobuyasu (1559–1579)
                  • Kuma-hime (1577–1626), m. Honda Tadamasa, 2nd daimyō of Kuwana (1575–1631)
                    • Kuni-hime (1595–1649), m. Arima Naozumi, daimyō of Shimabara (1586–1641)
                      • daughter, m. Akimoto Tomitomo, 1st daimyō of Yamura (1610–1657)
                        • daughter, m. Toda Takamasa, 1st daimyō of Sakura (1632–1699)
                          • Toda Tadaaki
                            • Toda Tadami, 2nd daimyō of Utsunomiya (1689–1746)
                              • Toda Tadamitsu, daimyō of Shimabara (1730–1781)
                              • Toda Tadatō, daimyō of Shimabara (1739–1801)
                            • daughter, m.   II. Matsudaira Tadakatsu, 2nd daimyō of Shimabara (1st creation) (1673–1736; r. 1698–1735). He adopted a distant relation:
                              •   III. Matsudaira Tadami, 3rd daimyō of Shimabara (1st creation) (1712–1738; r. 1735–1738). He adopted a cousin, Tadatoki, son of Matsudaira Kankei, a hatamoto (see above):
                • Kame-hime (1560–1625), m. Okudaira Nobumasa, 1st daimyō of Kanō (1555–1615)
                  • Matsudaira Tadaaki, 1st daimyō of Himeji (1583–1644)
                    • Eshō-in, m. Nabeshima Tadanao (1613–1635)
                      • Nabeshima Mitsushige, 2nd daimyō of Saga (1632–1700)
                        • Nabeshima Muneshige, 5th daimyō of Saga (1687–1755)
                          • Nabeshima Harushige, 8th daimyō of Saga (1745–1805)
                            • daughter, m. Date Munetada, 7th daimyō of Uwajima (1792–1889)
                              •   VI. Matsudaira Tadaatsu, 6th daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation) (1841–1860; r. 1859–1860)
                • Tokugawa Yorifusa, 1st daimyō of Mito (1603–1661)
                  • Matsudaira Yorishige, 1st daimyō of Takamatsu (1622–1695)
                    • Yoritoshi (1661–1687)
                      • Yoritoyo, 3rd daimyō of Takamatsu (1680–1735)
                        • Tokugawa Munetaka, 4th daimyō of Mito (1705–1730)
                          • Tokugawa Munemoto, 5th daimyō of Mito (1728–1766)
                            • Tokugawa Harumori, 6th daimyō of Mito (1751–1805)
                              • Tokugawa Harutoshi, 7th daimyō of Mito (1773–1816)
                                • Tokugawa Nariaki, 9th daimyō of Mito (1800–1860)
                                  •   VIII. Tadakazu, 8th daimyō of Shimabara (2nd creation), 8th family head, 1st Viscount (1851–1917; daimyō: 1862–1869; Governor: 1869–1871; family head: 1862–1917; Viscount: cr. 1884)
                                    • Tadaii (1870–1909)
                                      • Tadaryō, 9th family head, 2nd Viscount (1903–1934; 9th family head and 2nd Viscount: 1917–1934)
                                        • Tadasada, 10th family head, 3rd Viscount (born 1928; 10th family head: 1934–present; 3rd Viscount: 1934–1947)
                                          • Tadatsugu (b. 1965)
                                          • Tadaoki (b. 1967)
    • Tadakage (d. 1485)
      • Tadasada
        • Yoshikage (1517–1561)
          • Koretada (1537–1575)
            • Ietada, daimyō of Omigawa (1555–1600)
              • Tadatoshi, 1st daimyō of Yoshida (1582–1632)
                •   I. Tadafusa, 1st daimyō of Shimabara (1st creation, cr. 1669) (1619–1700; daimyō: 1669–1698)

[10]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Hizen Province" at JapaneseCastleExplorer.com; retrieved 2013-5-28.
  2. ^ Mass, Jeffrey P. and William B. Hauser. (1987). The Bakufu in Japanese History, p. 150.
  3. ^ Elison, George and Bardwell L. Smith (1987). Warlords, Artists, & Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century, p. 18.
  4. ^ Murray, David. (1905). Japan, pp. 258–259.
  5. ^ a b Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d’histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Arima" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 3; retrieved 2013-6-7.
  6. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Matsukura" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 33; retrieved 2013-6-7.
  7. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Kōriki" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 24; retrieved 2013-6-7.
  8. ^ a b Papinot, (2003). "Matsudaira (Fukzmizo)" at Nobiliare du Japon, p. 31; retrieved 2013-6-7.
  9. ^ Papinot, (2003). "Toda" at Nobiliare du Japon, pp. 60-61; retrieved 2013-6-7.
  10. ^ Genealogy (jp)

External linksEdit