Second Keating Ministry

The Second Keating Ministry (Labor) was the 59th ministry of the Government of Australia. It was led by the country's 24th Prime Minister, Paul Keating. The Second Keating Ministry succeeded the First Keating Ministry, which dissolved on 24 March 1993 following the federal election that took place on 13 March. The ministry was replaced by the First Howard Ministry on 11 March 1996 following the federal election that took place on 2 March which saw the LiberalNational Coalition defeat Labor.[1][2]

Second Keating Ministry
Flag of Australia.svg
59th Ministry of Australia
Second Keating Cabinet 1994.jpg
Governor-General Bill Hayden with newly appointed members of the Second Keating Ministry on 25 March 1994
Date formed24 March 1993
Date dissolved11 March 1996
People and organisations
MonarchElizabeth II
Governor-GeneralBill Hayden
Sir William Deane
Prime MinisterPaul Keating
Deputy Prime Minister Brian Howe
Kim Beazley
No. of ministers34 (plus 10 Parliamentary Secretaries)
Member partyLabor
Status in legislatureMajority government
Opposition cabinetDowner
Opposition partyLiberalNational coalition
Opposition leaderJohn Hewson
Alexander Downer
John Howard
History
Election(s)13 March 1993
Outgoing election2 March 1996
Legislature term(s)37th
PredecessorFirst Keating Ministry
SuccessorFirst Howard Ministry

CabinetEdit

Party Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Hon Paul Keating
(1944-)

MP for Blaxland
(1969–1996)

 
  Hon Brian Howe
(1936–)

MP for Batman
(1977–1996)

 
  Hon Gareth Evans QC
(1944–)

Senator for Victoria
(1978–1996)

 
  Hon Robert Ray
(1947–)

Senator for Victoria
(1981–2008)

 
  Hon John Dawkins
(1947–)

MP for Fremantle
(1977–1994)

 
  Hon Ralph Willis
(1938–)

MP for Gellibrand
(1972–1998)

 
  Hon Kim Beazley
(1948–)

MP for Swan
(1980–1996)

 
  Hon Graham Richardson
(1949–)

Senator for New South Wales
(1983–1994)

 
  Hon Ros Kelly
(1948–)

MP for Canberra
(1980–1995)

 
  Hon Peter Cook
(1943–2005)

Senator for Western Australia
(1983–2005)

 
  Hon Nick Bolkus
(1950–)

Senator for South Australia
(1981–2005)

 
  Hon Simon Crean
(1949–)

MP for Hotham
(1990–2013)

 
  Hon Alan Griffiths
(1952–)

MP for Maribyrnong
(1983–1996)

 
  Hon Bob Collins
(1946–2007)

Senator for Northern Territory
(1987–1998)

 
  Hon Peter Baldwin
(1951–)

MP for Sydney
(1983–1998)

 
  Hon Bob McMullan
(1947–)

Senator for Australian Capital Territory
(1988–1996)

 
  Hon Laurie Brereton
(1946–)

MP for Kingsford-Smith
(1990–2004)

 
  Hon Michael Lee
(1957–)

MP for Dobell
(1984–2001)

 
  Hon Michael Lavarch
(1961–)

MP for Dickson
(1993–1996) (in Cabinet from 27 April 1993)

 
  Hon John Faulkner
(1954–)

Senator for New South Wales
(1989–2015) (in Cabinet from 25 March 1994)

 
  Hon Dr Carmen Lawrence
(1948–)

MP for Fremantle
(1994–2007) (in Cabinet from 25 March 1994)

 

Outer ministryEdit

Party Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Hon David Beddall
(1948–)

MP for Rankin
(1984–1998)

 
  Hon Gordon Bilney
(1939–2012)

MP for Kingston
(1983–1996)

 
  Hon Robert Tickner
(1951–)

MP for Hughes
(1984–1996)

 
  Hon Ross Free
(1943–)

MP for Lindsay
(1984–1996)

 
  Hon Jeannette McHugh
(1934–)

MP for Grayndler
(1993–1996)

 
  Hon Dr Rosemary Crowley
(1938–)

Senator for South Australia
(1983–2002)

 
  Hon George Gear
(1947–)

MP for Canning
(1984–1996)

 
  Hon Duncan Kerr
(1952–)

MP for Denison
(1987–2010)

 
  Hon Chris Schacht
(1946–)

Senator for South Australia
(1987–2002)

 
  Hon Frank Walker QC
(1942–2012)

MP for Robertson
(1990–1996)

 
  Hon Gary Johns
(1952–)

MP for Petrie
(1984–1996) (in Ministry from 23 December 1993)

 
  Hon Gary Punch
(1957–)

MP for Barton
(1983–1996) (in Ministry from 25 March 1994)

 
  Hon Con Sciacca
(1947–2017)

MP for Bowman
(1987–1996) (in Ministry from 25 March 1994)

 

Parliamentary SecretariesEdit

Party Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Hon Janice Crosio MBE
(1939–)

MP for Prospect
(1990–2004)

 
  Hon Peter Duncan
(1945–)

MP for Makin
(1984–1996)

 
  Hon Ted Lindsay
(1942–)

MP for Herbert
(1983–1996)

 
  Hon Neil O'Keefe
(1947–)

MP for Burke
(1984–2001)

 
  Hon Nick Sherry
(1955–)

Senator for Tasmania
(1990–2012)

 
  Hon Warren Snowdon
(1950–)

MP for Northern Territory
(1987–1996)

 
  Hon Dr Andrew Theophanous
(1946–)

MP for Calwell
(1984–2001)

 
  Hon Paul Elliott
(1954–)

MP for Parramatta
(1990–1996)

 
  Hon Mary Crawford
(1947–)

MP for Forde
(1987–1996)

 
  Hon Arch Bevis
(1955–)

MP for Brisbane
(1990–2010)

 

Changes to the ministryEdit

On 27 April 1993, following his success at the Dickson special election on 17 April, Michael Lavarch was appointed Attorney-General.

On 23 December 1993, Treasurer John Dawkins resigned from the ministry and from Parliament, and a reshuffle took place. Laurie Brereton and Gary Johns were appointed to the ministry.[3]

On 30 January 1994, Alan Griffiths resigned from the ministry. [4]

On 1 March 1994, Ros Kelly resigned from the ministry following the sports rorts affair. [5]

On 25 March 1994, Graham Richardson resigned from the ministry citing ill health. Carmen Lawrence, who had replaced Dawkins at the 1994 Fremantle by-election, was appointed to the ministry. Con Sciacca and Gary Punch were promoted to ministers to fill earlier vacancies.[6]

On 20 June 1995, Brian Howe resigned as Deputy Prime Minister, although retaining his Housing and Regional Development portfolio. The party room unanimously elected Kim Beazley to replace him.[7]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Ministries and Cabinets". Parliamentary Handbook. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 3 February 2012.
  2. ^ "Ministerial List". Australian Government Gazette (S92). 24 March 1993. p. 1–4. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  3. ^ "Resignations and Appointments". Australian Government Gazette (S32). 23 December 1993. p. 1–4. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  4. ^ "Resignations and Appointments". Australian Government Gazette (S31). 30 January 1994. p. 1–4. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  5. ^ "Resignations and Appointments". Australian Government Gazette (S84). 1 March 1994. p. 1–2. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  6. ^ "Proclamation". Australian Government Gazette (S135). 25 March 1994. p. 1–6. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  7. ^ "Party faces the future, sensibly". The Canberra Times. Canberra. 21 June 1995. p. 1. Retrieved 27 September 2020 – via National Library of Australia.