Sasshūnada Yasutaka

Sasshūnada Yasutaka (born 7 June 1957 as Katsuyuki Yoshizaki) is a former sumo wrestler from Ibusuki, Kagoshima, Japan. He made his professional debut in January 1976, and reached the top division in September 1986. His highest rank was maegashira 1. He retired in September 1992 and as of 2016 is an elder in the Japan Sumo Association under the name Tatsutayama.[1]

Sasshūnada Yasutaka
薩洲洋 康貴
Personal information
BornKatsuyuki Yoshizaki
(1957-06-07) 7 June 1957 (age 63)
Ibusuki, Kagoshima, Japan
Height1.82 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Weight150 kg (330 lb)
Career
StableKimigahamaIzutsu
Record545-532-7
DebutJanuary, 1976
Highest rankMaegashira 1 (March, 1988)
RetiredSeptember, 1992
Elder nameTatsutayama
Championships1 (Jūryō)
1 (Makushita)
1 (Jonokuchi)
* Up to date as of Sep. 2012.

CareerEdit

He was born in the southern city of Ibusuki, in the southern-most prefecture of Kyushu. He is from the same area of Japan as his more famous stablemates, Terao and Sakahoko.[2] He had done judo at high school, but decided to switch to sumo. He joined Kimigahama stable (later Izutsu stable), founded by former sekiwake Tsurugamine in January 1976. He initially fought under his own surname of Yoshizaki. He won the yūshō or tournament championship in his first appearance on the banzuke ranking sheets in the jonokuchi division with a perfect 7-0 record. However his progress up the ranks was slow. In 1982 he was given the shikona of Sasshunada, meaning "sea of Sasshu."[2] He finally broke into the elite sekitori ranks after the May 1984 tournament when he won the makushita division championship and was promoted to jūryō. (Terao made his juryo debut at the same time). He won the jūryō championship in September 1985 with a mere 10-5 record after beating Hidanohana in a playoff. He won promotion to the top makuuchi division after the July 1986 tournament at the age of 29, having spent ten years in sumo.

Sasshūnada was one of five men from Izutsu stable in the top division simultaneously,[2] the others being Terao, Sakahoko, Kirishima and Jingaku. However he was unable to make much of an impression on the top ranked wrestlers and lacked the fighting spirit of some his stablemates.[2] He never managed to defeat a yokozuna or win a special prize in his 19 tournaments ranked in the top division, and his highest rank reached was maegashira 1 in March 1988. In September 1989 his three-year stay in makuuchi ended when he scored only 5-10 at maegashira 14, and he was demoted to jūryō where he was to spend the remainder of his career.

Retirement from sumoEdit

Sasshūnada's last tournament was in July 1992, and he chose to retire rather than compete in the makushita division in September. He had not missed a single bout in his career, fighting 1077 consecutive matches. He became an elder of the Sumo Association, working as a coach at Izutsu stable. Unable to purchase elder stock at first, he borrowed a succession of different elder names before acquiring the Tatsutayama name in 1998.[3] In 2005 he transferred from Izutsu stable to work at Michinoku stable,[3] run by his former stablemate Kirishima.

Fighting styleEdit

Keeping with the reputation of his stable, Sasshūnada was known for having a very powerful pushing attack.[2] His preferred techniques were oshidashi (push out) and hatakikomi (slap down), which together accounted for sixty percent of his career victories.[4]

Personal lifeEdit

Married with one son, as a wrestler Sasshūnada was fond of visiting pachinko parlours in his spare time.[2]

Career recordEdit

Sasshūnada Yasutaka[5]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1976 (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #18
7–0
Champion

 
East Jonidan #36
4–3
 
West Jonidan #14
5–2
 
East Sandanme #72
3–4
 
West Sandanme #87
6–1
 
1977 West Sandanme #40
3–4
 
West Sandanme #5
5–2
 
East Sandanme #14
3–4
 
East Sandanme #26
4–3
 
West Sandanme #14
3–4
 
West Sandanme #24
5–2
 
1978 West Sandanme #2
2–5
 
West Sandanme #23
2–5
 
East Sandanme #47
4–3
 
East Sandanme #30
5–2
 
East Makushita #59
4–3
 
East Makushita #50
3–4
 
1979 East Sandanme #2
3–4
 
West Sandanme #15
3–4
 
West Sandanme #27
4–3
 
West Sandanme #16
4–3
 
West Sandanme #7
6–1
 
East Makushita #39
4–3
 
1980 East Makushita #30
3–4
 
East Makushita #41
3–4
 
West Makushita #51
6–1
 
West Makushita #22
5–2
 
East Makushita #12
3–4
 
East Makushita #20
1–6
 
1981 West Makushita #43
5–2
 
East Makushita #27
4–3
 
East Makushita #16
2–5
 
East Makushita #32
4–3
 
West Makushita #24
3–4
 
East Makushita #31
5–2
 
1982 West Makushita #16
5–2
 
West Makushita #6
3–4
 
West Makushita #12
3–4
 
East Makushita #9
1–6
 
East Makushita #34
5–2
 
East Makushita #18
4–3
 
1983 West Makushita #10
3–4
 
West Makushita #18
4–3
 
West Makushita #12
3–4
 
West Makushita #18
4–3
 
East Makushita #13
3–4
 
East Makushita #20
4–3
 
1984 East Makushita #12
2–5
 
West Makushita #28
5–2
 
East Makushita #12
7–0
Champion

 
East Jūryō #11
8–7
 
East Jūryō #8
8–7
 
West Jūryō #6
9–6
 
1985 West Jūryō #5
9–6
 
West Jūryō #1
7–8
 
West Jūryō #3
9–6
 
West Jūryō #2
7–8
 
East Jūryō #4
10–5–P
Champion

 
West Jūryō #1
6–9
 
1986 East Jūryō #6
7–8
 
West Jūryō #8
8–7
 
East Jūryō #6
10–5
 
West Jūryō #1
10–5
 
West Maegashira #11
8–7
 
East Maegashira #6
6–9
 
1987 East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #7
6–9
 
West Maegashira #11
8–7
 
East Maegashira #6
5–10
 
East Maegashira #13
9–6
 
West Maegashira #5
7–8
 
1988 East Maegashira #6
9–6
 
West Maegashira #1
4–11
 
East Maegashira #10
8–7
 
West Maegashira #5
7–8
 
East Maegashira #6
6–9
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
1989 West Maegashira #4
4–11
 
East Maegashira #10
7–8
 
West Maegashira #11
8–7
 
East Maegashira #9
6–9
 
East Maegashira #14
5–10
 
East Jūryō #7
8–7
 
1990 West Jūryō #2
9–6
 
East Jūryō #1
5–10
 
East Jūryō #6
6–9
 
West Jūryō #10
9–6
 
West Jūryō #5
7–8
 
West Jūryō #6
9–6
 
1991 East Jūryō #2
6–9
 
West Jūryō #6
7–8
 
West Jūryō #8
8–7
 
West Jūryō #6
5–10
 
East Jūryō #10
7–8
 
West Jūryō #11
8–7
 
1992 West Jūryō #7
7–8
 
West Jūryō #8
5–10
 
West Makushita #1
5–2
 
East Jūryō #11
4–11
 
West Makushita #7
Retired
0–0–7
x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Oyakata (Coaches)". Nihon Sumo Kyokai. Retrieved 17 August 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Patmore, Angela (1990). The Giants of Sumo. MacDonald/Queen Anne Press. pp. 121–123. ISBN 9780356181202.
  3. ^ a b "Sasshunada Yasutaka Kabu History". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  4. ^ "Sasshunada bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 1 April 2016.
  5. ^ "Sasshūnada Yasutaka Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 3 September 2012.