Michinoku stable

Michinoku stable.jpg

The Michinoku stable (陸奥部屋, Michinoku-beya) is a stable of sumo wrestlers, part of the Tokitsukaze ichimon or group of stables. It was established in 1974 by former maegashira Hoshikabuto, who branched off from Izutsu stable. Former ōzeki Kirishima became the current head coach in December 1997. It absorbed Tatsutagawa stable in November 2000 upon the retirement of the stablemaster there.[1] It lost four top members in April 2011 (Hakuba, Toyozakura, Jūmonji and Kirinowaka), who were forced to retire after being found guilty of match-fixing.[2] The retirement of Ryūhō in 2012 left it with no sekitori until Kiribayama reached the juryo division in 2019. Kiribayama reached the top makuuchi division in January 2020, the first for the stable since Hakuba in 2008.

After the death of Izutsu Oyakata in September 2019[3] all personnel from Izutsu stable moved to Michinoku as of 1 October 2019.[4] This expanded the stable to 15 wrestlers, the most senior of whom is yokozuna Kakuryū.

Ring name conventionsEdit

In the past wrestlers at this stable took ring names or shikona that began with the character 星 (read: hoshi), meaning star, in deference to two of their former owners, but many now use 霧 (read: kiri), meaning fog or mist, after the current owner Kirishima, such as Kiribayama, Kirinoryu and Kirinofuji.

OwnersEdit

Notable active wrestlersEdit

CoachesEdit

AssistantEdit

Notable former membersEdit

UsherEdit

HairdresserEdit

  • Tokodai (First class tokoyama)
  • Tokotsuru (First class tokoyama)

Location and accessEdit

Tokyo, Sumida Ward, Ryōgoku 1-18-7
1 minute walk from Ryōgoku Station on Sōbu Line

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Michinoku Kabu History". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-28.
  2. ^ "Match-fixing wrestlers forced to retire". Times Live. 2011-04-01. Retrieved 2012-09-28.
  3. ^ "鶴竜ら井筒親方死去で鏡山親方の一時預かりに" (in Japanese). Nikkan Sports. 17 September 2019. Retrieved 18 September 2019.
  4. ^ "鶴竜ら力士3人、床山1人の陸奥部屋への転属を承認". Nikkan Sports (in Japanese). 27 September 2019. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  5. ^ a b "Sumo Beya Guide - Michinoku Beya". Nihon Sumō Kyōkai. Archived from the original on 2012-07-17. Retrieved 2012-09-28.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 35°41′45″N 139°47′29″E / 35.6957°N 139.7913°E / 35.6957; 139.7913