Australian Institute of Architects

The Australian Institute of Architects (officially as the Royal Australian Institute of Architects, abbreviated as RAIA) is a professional body for architects in Australia. The post-nominals of FRAIA (Fellow) and RAIA (Members and organisation abbreviation) continue to be used.

Australian Institute of Architects
Logo of the Australian Institute of Architects 2008.png
Tusculum.JPG
Tusculum (1837), NSW Chapter headquarters
AbbreviationRAIA
Formation1929; 92 years ago (1929)
Legal statusProfessional body; members association
HeadquartersL1/41 Exhibition St, Melbourne
Location
Region
Australia
FieldsArchitecture
CEO
Julia Cambage
President
Alice Hampson
SubsidiariesNSW Chapter
VIC Chapter
QLD Chapter
SA Chapter
WA Chapter
TAS Chapter
NT Chapter
ACT Chapter
AffiliationsInternational Union of Architects
WebsiteArchitecture.com.au

HistoryEdit

The Australian Institute of Architects was established on 6 September 1929 and continued under this name until 18 August 1930, when the "Royal" title was granted, and it became the Royal Australian Institute of Architects.[1]

A number of states formed professional societies for architects, including the Queensland Institute of Architects,[2] and the West Australian Institute of Architects.

The South Australian Institute of Architects (SAIA) was founded in 1886, and in 1904 Walter Hervey Bagot designed its seal.[3]

The Australian Institute was formed in 1929, when state architectural institutes combined to form a unified national association, although full federation of the state-based institutes did not come about immediately, with some states maintaining their independence.[citation needed] The South Australian Institute of Architects only joined up in July 1962, becoming the "South Australian Chapter".[4][5][3] The Royal Victorian Institute of Architects (RVIA) was the last to join, in 1968.[6]

Name changeEdit

In August 2008,[3] following an informal poll of members in 2001, the National Council resolved to continue trading as the "Australian Institute of Architects", while retaining "Royal Australian Institute of Architects" as the legal name. The postnominals of "FRAIA" (Fellow) and "RAIA" (Members and organisation abbreviation) continue to be used with the legal name abbreviated.[7]

Purpose, functions, affiliationsEdit

As a professional body representing architects, the Institute is represented on many national and state industry and government bodies, and is affiliated with the International Union of Architects (UIA).[citation needed]

A chapter is maintained in each state and territory,

National awards and prizesEdit

Gold MedalEdit

The AIA Gold Medal is the highest award of the Australian Institute of Architects awarded annually since 1960.

Paula Whitman Leadership in Gender Equity PrizeEdit

This award honours architect and gender equity advocate Paula Whitman.[8][9]

National Architecture AwardsEdit

The National Architecture Awards have been presented since 1981 and include:

State architecture awards and prizesEdit

Each of the state chapters also presents awards, with notable examples including:

New South WalesEdit

QueenslandEdit

South AustraliaEdit

  • Sir James Irwin Chapter President's Medal
  • Jack McConnell Award for Public Architecture
  • Keith Neighbour Award for Commercial Architecture
  • Robert Dickson Award for Interior Architecture
  • John S Chappell Award for Residential Architecture – Houses (New)
  • David Saunders Award for Heritage Architecture
  • Derrick Kendrick Award for Sustainable Architecture
  • Jack Cheesman Award For Enduring Architecture

VictoriaEdit

Western AustraliaEdit

PresidentsEdit

National presidentsEdit

National presidents:[1]

  • 1929–1930 Alfred Samuel Hook
  • 1930–1931 William Arthur Mordey Blackett
  • 1931–1932 Philip Rupert Claridge
  • 1932–1933 Lange Powell
  • 1933–1934 Charles Edward Serpell
  • 1934–1935 Arthur William Anderson[12][13]
  • 1935–1936 Guy St John Makin
  • 1936–1937 James Nangle
  • 1937–1938 Louis Laybourne Smith
  • 1938–1939 Frederick Bruce Lucas
  • 1939–1940 Otto Albrecht Yuncken
  • 1940–1942 William Ronald Richardson
  • 1942–1944 John Francis Deighton Scarborough
  • 1944–1946 Roy Sharrington Smith
  • 1946–1948 William Rae Laurie
  • 1948–1950 Jack Denyer Cheesman
  • 1950–1952 Cobden Parkes[14]
  • 1952–1954 Robert Snowden Demaine
  • 1954–1956 Edward James Archibald Weller
  • 1956–1957 William Purves Race Godfrey
  • 1957–1959 Wilfred Thomas Haslam
  • 1959–1960 Kenneth Charles Duncan
  • 1960–1961 Thomas Brenan Femister Gargett
  • 1961–1962 Henry Ingham Ashworth
  • 1962–1963 James Campbell Irwin
  • 1963–1964 Max Ernest Collard
  • 1964–1965 Raymond Berg
  • 1965–1966 Gavin Walkley
  • 1966–1967 Mervyn Henry Parry
  • 1967–1968 Best Overend
  • 1968–1969 Jack Hobbs McConnell
  • 1969–1970 John David Fisher
  • 1970–1971 Ronald Andrew Gilling
  • 1992-1993 Robert Denyer Cheesman
  • 1994–1995 Louise Cox
  • 1995–1996 Peter Robert Gargett
  • 1996–1997 John Stanley Castles
  • 1997–1998 Eric Graham Butt
  • 1998–1999 Graham Humphries
  • 1999–2000 Nigel Warren Shaw
  • 2000–2001 Edward Robert Haysom
  • 2001–2003 Graham Jahn
  • 2003–2004 David John Parken
  • 2004–2005 Warren Merton Kerr
  • 2005–2006 Bob Nation
  • 2006–2007 Carey Lyon
  • 2007–2008 Alec Tzannes
  • 2008–2009 Howard Tanner
  • 2009–2010 Melinda Dodson
  • 2010–2011 Karl Fender
  • 2011–2012 Brian Zulaikha
  • 2012–2013 Shelley Penn
  • 2013–2014 Paul Berkemeier
  • 2014–2015 David Karotkin
  • 2015–2016 Jon Clements
  • 2016–2017 Ken Maher
  • 2017–2018 Richard Kirk
  • 2018–2019 Clare Cousins
  • 2019–2020 Helen Lochhead
  • 2020–2021 Alice Hampson[15]
  • 2021–2022 Tony Giannone[16]

State and territory chapter presidentsEdit

[needs update]

Australian Capital Territory (established 1962)Edit

ACT Chapter established in 1962.[17][18]

  • 1962–1964 Malcolm Moir[19][20]
  • 1964–1966 John Scollay[21]
  • 1966–1968 Peter Harrison
  • 1968–1970 John Goldsmith
  • 1970–1972 Horrie Holt
  • 1972–1974 Arthur Tow
  • 1974–1976 Neil Renfree
  • 1976–1978 Tony Cooper[22]
  • 1978–1980 Mervyn Willoughby-Thomas[23]
  • 1980–1982 Ian Thompson[24]
  • 1982–1984 Geoffrey Butterworth[25]
  • 1984–1986 Barry Cameron[26]
  • 1986–1988 Rick Butt[27]
  • 1988–1990 Alastair Swayn[28]
  • 1990–1992 Colin Stewart[29]
  • 1992–1993 Peter Freeman[30]
  • 1993–1994 Annabelle Pegrum[31]
  • 1994–1998 Graham Humphries[32]
  • 1998–2002
  • 2002–2006 Catherine Townsend[33]
  • 2006–2008 Melinda Dodson
  • 2008–2010 David Flannery[34]
  • 2010–2012 Sheila Hughes
  • 2012–2014 Tony Trobe[35]
  • 2014–2016 Andrew Wilson
  • 2016–2018 Rob Henry
  • 2018–2020 Philip Leeson
  • 2020–2022 Shannon Battissonn[36]

New South Wales (established 1871, NSW Chapter from 1933)Edit

Northern Territory

  • President: Jenny Culgan
  • Immediate Past President: Andrew Broffman

Queensland

  • President: Paul Trotter
  • Immediate Past President: Bruce Wolfe
  • Past President: Paula Whitman

South Australia

  • President: Mario Dreosti
  • Immediate Past President: David Homburg

Tasmania

Victoria

  • President: Amy Muir
  • Immediate Past President: Vanessa Bird

Western Australia

  • 1989 - 1990 Brian F Wright AM LFRAIA
  • President: Suzanne Hunt[92]
  • Immediate Past President: Philip Griffiths (elected 2014)[92]

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit