Harry Marks (Queensland architect)

Henry (Harry) James Marks (1871–1939) was an architect in Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia. He was the architect of numerous buildings, many now listed on the Queensland Heritage Register.[1]

Early lifeEdit

Henry James Marks was born in Toowoomba in 1871.[1]

ArchitectureEdit

After training with his father James Marks, also an architect, he entered into partnership with him in 1892 as James Marks and Son. Harry Marks was considered a creative designer and was responsible for many buildings on the Darling Downs as well as two Roman Catholic Churches in Brisbane. During his career he invented and patented numerous ventilators, reversible casement windows and a method of stucco construction. He continued the practice into the 20th century and his son Charles Beresford Marks became a partner in 1925. In 1925 he became an Associate of the Queensland Institute of Architects, becoming a Fellow 1929.[1]

Later lifeEdit

On 1 March 1939 while walking home for lunch, Harry Marks collapsed and died at the corner of Ruthven and Margaret Streets in Toowooomba.[1][2] His funeral was held at St James Church of England in Towooomba on 2 March 1939 and he was buried that same day in the Drayton and Toowoomba Cemetery.[3][4]

WorksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "Goombungee War Memorial (entry 600826)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  2. ^ "Sudden Death of Downs Architect". The Courier-Mail. Brisbane: National Library of Australia. 2 March 1939. p. 2. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  3. ^ "Family Notices". The Courier-Mail. Brisbane: National Library of Australia. 2 March 1939. p. 10 Section: Second Section. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  4. ^ "Marks, Harry". Burial database. Toowoomba Regional Council. Retrieved 13 November 2014.
  5. ^ "Ascot House (entry 600853)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Gowrie House (entry 601307)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  7. ^ "Alexandra Building (entry 601317)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  8. ^ "Rodway (entry 600868)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  9. ^ "Exchange Building (entry 601319)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  10. ^ "Bishop's House (entry 600845)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  11. ^ "St James Parish Hall (entry 600856)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  12. ^ "Glen Alpine (entry 600842)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014.
  13. ^ "St John's Anglican Church (entry 602399)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 17 January 2014.

AttributionEdit

  This Wikipedia article incorporates text from "The Queensland heritage register" published by the State of Queensland under CC-BY 3.0 AU licence (accessed on 7 July 2014, archived on 8 October 2014).