Roman Catholic Diocese of Vannes

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Vannes (Latin: Dioecesis Venetensis; French: Diocèse de Vannes) is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. Erected in the 5th century, the Episcopal see is Vannes Cathedral in the city of Vannes. The diocese corresponds to the department of Morbihan, and is suffragan to the Archdiocese of Rennes, Dol, and Saint-Malo. Raymond Michel René Centène is the current bishop since his appointment in 2005.

Diocese of Vannes

Dioecesis Venetensis

Diocèse de Vannes
Cathédrale Saint-Pierre de Vannes.jpg
Location
CountryFrance
Ecclesiastical provinceRennes
MetropolitanArchdiocese of Rennes, Dol, and Saint-Malo
Statistics
Area7,092 km2 (2,738 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics (including non-members)
(as of 2014)
727,000
583,000 (80.2%)
Information
DenominationRoman Catholic
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established5th Century
CathedralCathedral Basilica of St. Peter in Vannes
Patron saintSt. Padarn
Secular priests261 (diocesan)
94 (religious orders)
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopRaymond Centène
Metropolitan ArchbishopPierre d'Ornellas
Website
Website of the Diocese

HistoryEdit

In 1801, the diocese was expanded after the Concordat of 1802, to include part of the ancient Diocese of Saint-Malo, which was subsequently suppressed, after a three way split among the Dioceses of Vannes and Saint-Brieuc and the Archdiocese of Rennes.

In fictionEdit

Alexandre Dumas makes Aramis the local Ordinary of the Diocese of Vannes in The Vicomte of Bragelonne: Ten Years Later, the last book of his d'Artagnan Romances.[1]

Bishops of VannesEdit

to 1600Edit

1600 to 1800Edit

  • 1599–1622: Jacques Martin
  • 1622–1646: Sébastien de Rosmadec
  • 1648–1671: Charles de Rosmadec
  • 1671–1687: Louis Casset de Vautorte[2]
  • 1687–1716: François d'Argouges
  • 1716–1717: Louis de La Vergne-Montenard de Tressan
  • 1717–1719: Jean-François-Paul Lefèvre de Caumartin
  • Antoine Fagon † (29 Aug 1719 Appointed – 16 Feb 1742 Died)
  • Jean-Joseph Chapelle de Saint-Jean de Jumilhac † (2 Apr 1742 Appointed – 17 Apr 1746 Appointed, Archbishop of Arles)
  • Charles-Jean de Bertin † ( 1746 Appointed – 1774 Died)
  • Sébastien-Michel Amelot † (10 Nov 1774 Appointed – 1801 Resigned)

since 1800Edit

  • Antoine-Xavier Maynaud de Pancemont[3] † (9 Apr 1802 Appointed – 13 Mar 1807 Died)
  • Pierre-François-Gabriel-Raymond-Ignace-Ferdinand de Bausset-Roquefort † (19 Nov 1807 Appointed – 8 Aug 1817 Appointed, Archbishop of Aix)
  • Henri-Marie-Clauce de Bruc-Montplaisir † (27 Aug 1817 Appointed – 18 Jun 1826 Died)
  • Simon Garnier † (28 Jun 1826 Appointed – 8 May 1827 Died)
  • Charles-Jean de la Motte de Broons et de Vauvert † (4 Jul 1827 Appointed – 5 May 1860 Died)
  • Louis-Anne Dubreil † (5 Jun 1861 Appointed – 24 Oct 1863 Appointed, Archbishop of Avignon)
  • Jean-Baptiste Charles Gazailhan † (24 Oct 1863 Appointed – 1865 Resigned)
  • Jean-Marie Bécel † (30 Dec 1865 Appointed – 6 Nov 1897 Died)
  • Amédée-Jean-Baptiste Latieule † (22 Mar 1898 Appointed – 21 Oct 1903 Died)
  • Alcime-Armand-Pierre-Henri Gouraud † (21 Feb 1906 Appointed – 2 Oct 1928 Died)
  • Hippolyte Tréhiou † (15 Apr 1929 Appointed – 9 Jan 1941 Died)
  • Eugène-Joseph-Marie Le Bellec † (11 Oct 1941 Appointed – 24 Sep 1964 Retired)
  • Pierre-Auguste-Marie Boussard † (24 Sep 1964 Appointed – 16 Nov 1991 Retired)
  • François-Mathurin Gourvès † (16 Nov 1991 Succeeded – 28 Jun 2005 Retired)
  • Raymond Michel René Centène (28 Jun 2005 Appointed – present)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ William Allan McNair (1972). In search of the four musketeers. Sydney: Alpha Books., especially Chapter 18.
  2. ^ Cazet de Vautorte had previously been Bishop of Lectoure (1655-1671). He was nominated to Vannes by Louis XIV on 28 January 1671, and approved by Pope Clement IX on 22 June 1671. He died in Vannes either on 13 or 27 December 1671. Jean, pp. 454-455. Ritzler, V, p. 408 and n. 3.
  3. ^ Pancemont was appointed by First Consul Napoleon Bonaparte and consecrated at Notre-Dame de Paris by the Papal Legate, Cardinal Caprara. Ch. Hamel (1901). Histoire de l'église de Saint-Sulpice ... (in French). Paris: V. Lecoffre. pp. 90–102.

BibliographyEdit

Reference worksEdit

StudiesEdit

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 47°39′08″N 2°44′25″W / 47.65222°N 2.74028°W / 47.65222; -2.74028