Open main menu

Ray Montgomery (May 27, 1922 – June 4, 1998) was an American actor.[1]

Ray Montgomery
Born(1922-05-27)May 27, 1922
DiedJune 4, 1998(1998-06-04) (aged 76)
NationalityAmerican
OccupationActor
Years active1941–1990
Spouse(s)Jean Trent

Contents

BiographyEdit

AcademicsEdit

The winner of the 1940 national declamation finals in the National Forensic League Tournament at Terre Haute, Indiana,[2] Montgomery studied journalism at the University of Southern California.[3]

Military careerEdit

Montgomery served in the Naval Reserve Merchant Marine during World War II.[4]

RadioEdit

When he was 18 and still in college, Montgomery played Noel Chandler in the soap opera Dear John.[3]

TelevisionEdit

Montgomery had the role of Professor Howard Ogden in the syndicated children's adventure series Ramar of the Jungle in 1952-1953. Ogden was a colleague of the main character, Dr. Tom Reynolds (called "Ramar" by the natives).[5] He starred in the pilot of The West Point Story, a syndicated program about cadets at the United States Military Academy,[6] and appeared in the premiere episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, October 2, 1955.[7]

Post-acting careerEdit

In 1957, Montgomery left acting to join Ad-Staff Inc., a "Hollywood firm specializing in creation and production of jingles and other radio and tv spots," as the TV coordinator for the firm's Canada Dry account in the West.[8]

FamilyEdit

Montgomery was married to Jean Trent,[9] a "beautiful Universal starlet."[10]

Selected filmographyEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Ray Montgomery". nytimes.com. Retrieved August 21, 2014.
  2. ^ "Star Sparkles" (PDF). Movie-Radio Guide. November 9, 1940. p. 17. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  3. ^ a b "Say Hello to ..." (PDF). Radio and Television Mirror. 15 (3): 38. January 1941. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  4. ^ "'Air Force' Actor In Merchant Marine". Cumberland Evening Times. March 22, 1943. p. 7. Retrieved March 16, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  
  5. ^ McNeil, Alex (1996). Total Television. Penguin Books USA, Inc. ISBN 0-14-02-4916-8. P. 683.
  6. ^ "Ziv Peddling 'West Point'" (PDF). Billboard. March 31, 1956. p. 7. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  7. ^ "Alfred Hitchcock Presents". Broadcasting. October 10, 1955. p. 12. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  8. ^ "Program Services". Broadcasting. October 21, 1957. p. 122. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  9. ^ "Screen Gossip" (October 27, 1942). Toledo Blade. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  10. ^ "Carries On For Hubby". The Havre Daily News. July 13, 1945. p. 3. Retrieved March 16, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  

External linksEdit