Psittacosis outbreak of 1929–1930

The Psittacosis outbreak of 1929–1930, also known as the great parrot fever outbreak of 1929, was a worldwide outbreak of psittacosis affecting 750 to 800 people, with a 15% death rate. Previously, it had been described as a human disease in Europe in 1879, but was rarely reported. The establishment of the National Institutes of Health is directly linked to the outbreak that occurred in Maryland.[1][2][3][4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Grinblat-Huse, Valerie; Drabek, Elliott F.; Creasy, Heather Huot; Daugherty, Sean C.; Jones, Kristine M.; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Tallon, Luke J.; Read, Timothy D.; Hatch, Thomas P. (August 2011). "Genome Sequences of the Zoonotic Pathogens Chlamydia psittaci 6BC and Cal10". Journal of Bacteriology. 193 (15): 4039–4040. doi:10.1128/JB.05277-11. ISSN 0021-9193. PMC 3147492. PMID 21622741.
  2. ^ "Psittacosis in the United States, 1979". www.cdc.gov. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  3. ^ Lepore, Jill (31 May 2009). "In 1929, Parrot Fever Gripped The Country, interview with Jacki Lyden". NPR.org. Retrieved 6 April 2019.
  4. ^ Ramsay, Edward C. (2003). "The Psittacosis Outbreak of 1929–1930". Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery. 17 (4): 235–237. doi:10.1647/1082-6742(2003)017[0235:TPOO]2.0.CO;2. ISSN 1082-6742. JSTOR 27823356.