Premio Lo Nuestro 1990

The 2nd Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony, presented by Univision honoring the best Latin music of 1989 and 1990 took place on May 24, 1990, at a live presentation held at the Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.

2nd Lo Nuestro Awards
DateThursday, May 24, 1990 (1990-05-24)
SiteKnight Center
Miami, Florida, USA
Highlights
Most awardsLuis Enrique (3)
Most nominationsEl Gran Combo de Puerto Rico, Vicente Fernández, and Los Yonics (4)

During the ceremony, sixteen categories were presented. Winners were announced at the live event and included Nicaraguan singer Luis Enrique receiving three competitive awards. Mexican singer-songwriter Ana Gabriel, French band Kaoma, and Mexican group Bronco, and performer Vicente Fernández earned two accolades each.

BackgroundEdit

In 1989, the Lo Nuestro Awards were established by Univision, to recognize the most talented performers of Latin music.[1] The nominees and winners were selected by a voting poll conducted among program directors of Spanish-language radio stations in the United States and also based on chart performance on Billboard Latin music charts, with the results being tabulated and certified by the accounting firm Deloitte.[1][2] The award included a trophy shaped like a treble clef.[1] The categories were for the Pop, Tropical/Salsa, and Regional Mexican genres.[2] The 2nd Lo Nuestro Awards ceremony was held on May 24, 1991, in a live presentation held at the Knight Center in Miami, Florida. The ceremony was broadcast in the United States and Latin America by Univision.[2]

Winners and nomineesEdit

 
Mexican singer Ana Gabriel (pictured in 2006) won the Lo Nuestro Award for Pop Female Artist of the Year.
 
Nicaraguan singer Luis Enrique (pictured in 2010) was the most awarded performer, winning for Artist, Album and Song of the Year in the Tropical/Salsa field.
 
Singer Vicente Fernández (pictured in 2011) received the Male Regional Mexican Artist of the Year Award.

Winners were announced before the live audience during the ceremony. Mexican singer Vicente Fernández and group Los Yonics, and Puerto-Rican band El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico were the most nominated acts with four nominations each.[2] Fernández won two awards for Regional/Mexican Artist and Song of the Year for his top ten single "Por Tu Maldito Amor".[2][3] Mexican singer-songwriter Ana Gabriel was awarded for Female Pop Artist and Pop Album of the Year with Tierra de Nadie.[4]

Nicaraguan singer Luis Enrique dominated the Tropical/Salsa field winning all his nominations, including Artist, Song and Album of the Year for his release Mi Mundo.[5] Cuban-American singer Celia Cruz earned the first Lifetime Achievement Award and fellow Cuban performer Gloria Estefan won for Crossover Artist of the Year.[2][5]

Winners and nominees of the 2nd Annual Lo Nuestro Awards.[4][6]
Pop Album of the Year Pop Song of the Year
Pop Male Artist of the Year Pop Female Artist of the Year
Pop Group of the Year New Pop Artist of the Year
Regional Mexican Album of the Year Regional Mexican Song of the Year
Regional Mexican Artist of the Year Regional Mexican Group of the Year
Regional Mexican New Artist of the Year
Tropical Salsa Album of the Year Tropical Salsa Song of the Year
Tropical Salsa Artist of the Year Tropical Salsa Group of the Year
Tropical Salsa New Artist of the Year
Producer of the Year Composer of the Year
Crossover Artist of the Year

PresentersEdit

Presenter(s) Category
Ana Gabriel
Braulio
Presenters of the awards for Pop Group or Duo of the Year
Chayanne
Andrea Del Boca
Presenters of the award for Regional Mexican Group or Duo of the Year
Ricardo Montaner
Luis Enrique
Presenters of the awards for Pop New Artist and Tropical Group or Duo of the Year
María Martha Serra Lima
Miguel Mateos
Presenters of the award for Regional Mexican New Artist of the Year
Yolanda del Río
Fito Olivares
Presenters of the award for Tropical Salsa New Artist
Ramón Arcusa Presenters of the award for Composer of the Year
Lucy Pereda
Diego Vodanovich
Presenters of the award for Pop Female Artist of the Year
Amanda Miguel
Diego Verdaguer
Presenter of the award for Pop Male Artist of the Year
Willy Chirino Presenter of the award for Crossover Artist of the Year
Randy Carrillo
Esteban Carrillo
Presenters of the award for Regional Mexican Album of the Year
Laura Flores
Franco De Vita
Presenters of the award for Pop Album of the Year
Joaquín Blaya
Jimmy Schmitt
Presenters of the Lifetime Excellence Award
Chantelle Presenters of the award for Tropical Album of the Year
Juan Carlos Calderón
Emilio Estefan
Presenters of the award for Producer of the Year
Myriam Hernández
José Javier Solís
Presenters of the award for Tropical Song of the Year
Valeria Lynch
Teresa Guerra
Presenters of the award for Regional Mexican Song of the Year
Braulio
Andrea Del Boca
Presenters of the award for Pop Song of the Year

Source:[7][8]

PerformersEdit

Name(s) Role Performed
Amanda Miguel
Diego Verdaguer
Performers "Simplemente Amor"
Los Temerarios Performers "Tu Infame Engaño"
Myriam Hernández Performer "El Hombre Que Yo Amo"
Luis Enrique Performer "Lo Que Pasó Entre Tu y Yo... Pasó"
Los Yonics Performers
Franco De Vita Performer "Louis"
Jorge Fonseca Performer "Miami Te Quiero"
Ricardo Montaner Performer "Me Va a Extrañar"
Chantelle
Mariachi Cobre
Performers
Yolanda del Río Performer "Válgame Dios"
David Pabon Performer "Aquel Viejo Motel"
Bronco Performers "Un Golpe Más"
Ana Gabriel Performer "Simplemente Amigos"
La Mafia Performers "Me Estoy Volviendo Loco"
Chayanne Performer "Simon Sez"
Kaoma Performers "Lambada"

Source:[7][8]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Historia: Premios Lo Nuestro". Terra (in Spanish). Terra Networks, Inc. February 6, 2006. Retrieved June 10, 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Lannert, John (April 1, 1990). "Univision, Billboard Announce Latin Music Awards Nominees". Sun-Sentinel. Tribune Company. Retrieved August 16, 2013.
  3. ^ "Vicente Fernández – Chart History". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved August 27, 2013.
  4. ^ a b "Lo Nuestro – Historia". Univision (in Spanish). Univision Communications. Archived from the original on June 26, 2015. Retrieved March 8, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Lannert, John (May 26, 1990). "Luis Enrique Tops Lo Nuestro Award Winners". Sun-Sentinel. Tribune Company. Retrieved September 4, 2013.
  6. ^ Houston Chronicle News Services (March 29, 1990). "Latin Music Awards - 3 Houston acts earn nominations". Houston Chronicle. Hearst Corporation.
  7. ^ a b "Premio Lo Nuestro a la Musica Latina 1990 (Lo Nuestro Latin Music Awards) (Premiere) (Spanish) (Tape 1 of 3) (TV)". Paley Center for Media. May 24, 1990. Retrieved February 12, 2014.
  8. ^ a b "Premio Lo Nuestro a la Musica Latina 1990 (Lo Nuestro Latin Music Awards) (Premiere) (Spanish) (Tape 2 of 3) (TV)". Paley Center for Media. May 24, 1990. Retrieved February 12, 2014.