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Principalities of Pomorje in the Early Middle Ages

Pomorje (Serbian: Поморје / Pomorje) or Primorje (Serbian: Приморје / Primorje), also known as Littoral Serbia (Serbian: Приморска Србија / Primorska Srbija, Latin: Serbia Maritima),[1] is a term (literary meaning: maritime, littoral or coastland) used in historical contexts to designate a geographical region of several territories of Upper Dalmatia and its hinterland, belonging to the present-day Montenegro, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia.[1][2]

Contents

HistoryEdit

At the beginning of the 9th century, according to 822 entry of Einhard's Royal Frankish Annals, Serbs were ruling over "the greater part of Dalmatia"[3][4] (ad Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem obtinere dicitur).[5] The state of maritime regions in the Early Middle Ages was described in the De Administrando Imperio,[6] a work by Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII (l. 905-959) dedicated to his son, Romanus II, as a domestic and foreign policy manual, referring to:

Pomorje included most of modern Montenegro, the southern halves of Herzegovina and Dalmatia, while the other geographical division, the Zagorje (literary meaning: land behind the hills) included most of modern Bosnia, the western half of the modern Serbia (Raška), and the northern portions of Montenegro and Herzegovina.[7] Croatia lay to the north of Pomorje and Zagorje, covering all the country between the Pomorje and Sava.[7]

Use in royal titlesEdit

The term was used in royal and religious titles; Serbian monarchs and their heirs (Uroš I, styled himself "King in Christ, God faithful, King of Serbia and Maritime Lands", and Patriarchs (Saint Sava III, "Archbishop of All Serbian and Maritime Lands").

  • Desa, styled himself "Prince of Pomorje (Maritime Lands)"
  • Vladislav, styled himself "King of all the Serbian and Maritime Lands"
  • Uroš I, styled himself "King in Christ, God faithful, King of Serbia and Maritime Lands"
  • Uroš IV Dušan, "King of all the Serbian and Maritime Lands"
  • In 1377 Tvrtko I crowned himself King of "Serbia, Bosnia, Pomorje, and the Western lands."

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Јанковић 2007.
  2. ^ Janković 2007.
  3. ^ Einhard (1845). Einhardi Annales. Hahn. pp. 83–. ad Sorabos, quae natio magnam Dalmatiae partem obtinere dicitur
  4. ^ Scholz 1970, p. 111.
  5. ^ Pertz 1845, p. 83.
  6. ^ Moravcsik 1967.
  7. ^ a b Nevill Forbes, The Balkans: A History of Bulgaria, Serbia, Greece, Rumania, Turkey, p. 59, Digital Antiquaria, 2004, ISBN 1-58057-314-2, ISBN 978-1-58057-314-6

SourcesEdit

Primary sources
Secondary sources

Further readingEdit