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Plymouth Devonport (UK Parliament constituency)

HistoryEdit

The constituency was created as Devonport in 1832, and elected two members until 1918, when the number was reduced to one. Following the amalgamation of Devonport into Plymouth, the constituency was renamed as Plymouth, Devonport.

Devonport has had a number of prominent MPs, including Leslie Hore-Belisha, Michael Foot (who began his Commons career in the seat), and the former SDP leader David Owen. One of its longest serving MPs was the National Liberal, later Conservative Dame Joan Vickers, who held the seat from 1955 until her defeat at the General Election of February 1974.

AbolitionEdit

Following the Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies by the Boundary Commission for England, constituencies in Plymouth were reorganised, with both Plymouth Sutton and Plymouth Devonport being replaced by new constituencies of Plymouth Sutton and Devonport and Plymouth Moor View from 2010.[1] The vast majority (nearly 90%) of the Plymouth Devonport constituency became part of the new Plymouth Moor View constituency; the exception was Devonport ward which became part of Plymouth Sutton and Devonport. [2]

BoundariesEdit

1918-1950: The County Borough of Plymouth wards of Ford, Keyham, Molesworth, Nelson, St Aubyn, and St Budeaux.

1950-1955: The County Borough of Plymouth wards of Ford, Keyham, Molesworth, Mount Edgecumbe, Nelson, Pennycross, St Aubyn, St Budeaux, St Peter, and Stoke; and the parish of Tamerton Foliot in the Rural District of Plympton St Mary.

1955-1974: The County Borough of Plymouth wards of Drake, Ernesettle, Ford, Molesworth, Nelson, St Andrew, St Aubyn, St Budeaux, St Peter, and Stoke.

1974-1983: The County Borough of Plymouth wards of Ernesettle, Ford, St Andrew, St Aubyn, St Budeaux, St Peter, and Stoke.

1983-1997: The City of Plymouth wards of Budshead, Estover, Ham, Honicknowle, Keyham, St Budeaux, and Southway.

1997-2010: The City of Plymouth wards of Budshead, Eggbuckland, Estover, Ham, Honicknowle, Keyham, St Budeaux, and Southway.

From 1950 to 1983, the constituency included Plymouth city centre.

Members of ParliamentEdit

MPs 1832–1918Edit

Election First member[3] First party Second member[3] Second party
1832 Sir Edward Codrington Whig[4][5] Sir George Grey Whig[4][6][7][8][9]
1840 by-election Henry Tufnell Whig[10][11][12][4]
1847 Sir John Romilly Whig[13][14][12]
1852 Sir George Berkeley Conservative
1854 by-election Thomas Erskine Perry Whig[15][16]
1857 James Wilson Whig[17][18][19]
1859 Liberal Liberal
1859 by-election Sir Michael Seymour Liberal
1859 by-election Sir Arthur William Buller Liberal
1863 by-election William Ferrand Conservative
Jun 1865 by-election Thomas Brassey Liberal
Jul 1865 John Fleming Conservative
1866 by-election Lord Eliot Liberal Montague Chambers Liberal
1868 John Delaware Lewis Liberal
1874 Sir John Henry Puleston Conservative George Edward Price Conservative
1892 E. J. C. Morton Liberal Hudson Kearley Liberal
1902 by-election John Lockie Conservative
1904 by-election John Benn Liberal
1910 (January) Sir John Jackson Conservative Sir Clement Kinloch-Cooke Conservative
1918 reduced to one seat

MPs 1918–2010Edit

Election Member[3] Party
1918 Clement Kinloch-Cooke Coalition Conservative
1922 Conservative
1923 Leslie Hore-Belisha Liberal
1931 Liberal National
1942 National Independent
1945 Michael Foot Labour
1955 Dame Joan Vickers Conservative and National Liberal
1964 Conservative
Feb 1974 David Owen Labour
1981 Social Democrat
1988 Social Democrat (1988)
1990 Independent
1992 David Jamieson Labour
2005 Alison Seabeck Labour
2010 Constituency abolished: see Plymouth Moor View and Plymouth Sutton and Devonport

ElectionsEdit

Elections in the 1840sEdit

Codrington resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Manor of East Hendred, causing a by-election.

By-election, 24 January 1840: Devonport[20][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Henry Tufnell 974 56.5 N/A
Conservative George Robert Dawson[21] 750 43.5 N/A
Majority 224 13.0 N/A
Turnout 1,724 81.3 N/A
Registered electors 2,121
Whig hold Swing N/A
General election 1841: Devonport[20][4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Henry Tufnell 966 36.1 N/A
Whig George Grey 932 34.8 N/A
Conservative George Robert Dawson 780 29.1 N/A
Majority 152 5.7 N/A
Turnout 1,724 80.9 N/A
Registered electors 2,131
Whig hold Swing N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A

Grey was appointed Home Secretary, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 10 July 1846: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig George Grey Unopposed
Whig hold
General election 1847: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Henry Tufnell 1,136 37.9 +1.8
Whig John Romilly 1,022 34.1 −0.7
Conservative Joseph Sandars[22] 842 28.1 −1.0
Majority 180 6.0 +0.3
Turnout 1,921 (est) 82.0 (est) +1.1
Registered electors 2,343
Whig hold Swing +1.2
Whig hold Swing −0.1

Romilly was appointed Solicitor General for England and Wales, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 3 April 1848: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Romilly Unopposed
Whig hold

Elections in the 1850sEdit

Romilly was appointed Attorney General for England and Wales, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 17 July 1850: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Romilly Unopposed
Whig hold

Romilly was appointed Master of the Rolls, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 2 April 1851: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig John Romilly Unopposed
Whig hold
General election 1852: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Henry Tufnell 1,079 25.6 −12.3
Conservative George Berkeley 1,056 25.1 +11.0
Whig John Romilly 1,046 24.8 −9.3
Conservative John Heron-Maxwell[23] 1,032 24.5 +10.4
Turnout 2,107 (est) 87.5 (est) +5.5
Registered electors 2,407
Majority 23 0.5 −5.5
Whig hold Swing −11.5
Majority 10 0.2 N/A
Conservative gain from Whig Swing +10.9

Tufnell resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 11 May 1854: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Thomas Erskine Perry 1,091 61.3 +10.9
Conservative John Heron-Maxwell 689 38.7 −10.9
Majority 402 22.6 +22.1
Turnout 1,780 73.6 −13.9
Registered electors 2,417
Whig hold Swing +10.9
General election 1857: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Thomas Erskine Perry Unopposed
Whig James Wilson Unopposed
Registered electors 2,628
Whig hold
Whig gain from Conservative
General election 1859: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal James Wilson 1,216 26.9 N/A
Liberal Thomas Erskine Perry 1,198 26.5 N/A
Conservative William Ferrand 1,075 23.7 N/A
Conservative Archibald Peel[24] 1,039 22.9 N/A
Majority 123 2.7 N/A
Turnout 2,264 (est) 82.1 (est) N/A
Registered electors 2,759
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Wilson was appointed Vice-President of the Board of Trade, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 27 June 1859: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal James Wilson Unopposed
Liberal hold

Perry resigned after being appointed a member of the Council of India, causing a by-election.

By-election, 9 August 1859: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Michael Seymour 1,096 51.1 −2.3
Conservative William Ferrand 1,047 48.9 +2.3
Majority 49 2.3 −0.4
Turnout 2,143 77.7 −4.4
Registered electors 2,759
Liberal hold Swing −2.3

Wilson resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 17 August 1859: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Arthur William Buller 1,189 51.6 −1.8
Conservative William Ferrand 1,114 48.4 +1.8
Majority 75 3.3 +0.6
Turnout 2,303 83.5 +1.4
Registered electors 2,759
Liberal hold Swing −1.8

Elections in the 1860sEdit

Seymour resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 12 February 1863: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative William Ferrand 1,234 50.6 +4.0
Liberal Frederick Grey[25] 1,204 49.4 −4.0
Majority 30 1.2 N/A
Turnout 2,438 88.4 +6.3
Registered electors 2,758
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +4.0

Buller resigned in order to contest the 1865 Liskeard by-election.

By-election, 22 June 1865: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Thomas Brassey 1,264 51.1 −2.3
Conservative John Fleming 1,208 48.9 +2.3
Majority 56 2.3 −0.4
Turnout 2,472 87.7 +5.6
Registered electors 2,820
Liberal hold Swing −2.3
General election 1865: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Fleming 1,307 25.5 +2.6
Conservative William Ferrand 1,290 25.2 +1.5
Liberal Thomas Brassey 1,279 25.0 −1.9
Liberal Thomas Phinn[26] 1,243 24.3 −2.3
Majority 11 0.2 N/A
Turnout 2,560 (est) 90.8 (est) +8.7
Registered electors 2,820
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +2.4
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +1.8

The election was declared void on petition, on account of bribery and corrupt practices,[27] causing a by-election.

By-election, 22 May 1866: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal William Eliot 1,275 25.6 +0.6
Liberal Montague Chambers 1,269 25.5 +1.2
Conservative Henry Cecil Raikes 1,216 24.4 −1.1
Conservative Reginald Abbot[28] 1,215 24.4 −0.8
Majority 53 1.1 N/A
Turnout 2,488 (est) 88.2 (est) −2.6
Registered electors 2,820
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +0.9
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +1.0
General election 1868: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal John Delaware Lewis 1,541 26.6 +1.6
Liberal Montague Chambers 1,519 26.2 +1.9
Conservative William Ferrand 1,370 23.6 −1.6
Conservative William Palliser[29] 1,365 23.6 −1.9
Majority 149 2.6 N/A
Turnout 2,898 (est) 85.9 (est) −4.9
Registered electors 3,374
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +1.6
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +1.9

Elections in the 1870sEdit

General election 1874: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Henry Puleston 1,525 27.3 +3.7
Conservative George Edward Price 1,483 26.6 +3.0
Liberal John Delaware Lewis 1,327 23.8 −2.8
Liberal George William Culme Soltau-Symons[30] 1,250 22.4 −3.8
Majority 156 2.8 N/A
Turnout 2,793 (est) 83.4 (est) −2.5
Registered electors 3,348
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +3.3
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +3.4

Elections in the 1880sEdit

General election 1880: Devonport[20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Henry Puleston 1,753 27.0 −0.3
Conservative George Edward Price 1,746 26.9 +0.3
Liberal John Delaware Lewis 1,509 23.3 −0.5
Liberal Alexander Craig Sellar 1,476 22.8 +0.4
Majority 237 3.7 +0.9
Turnout 3,242 (est) 85.5 (est) +2.1
Registered electors 3,790
Conservative hold Swing +0.1
Conservative hold Swing −0.1
General election 1885: Devonport[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative George Edward Price 2,968 26.5 −0.4
Conservative John Henry Puleston 2,944 26.3 −0.7
Liberal George Webb Medley 2,653 23.7 +0.4
Liberal Thomas Terrell 2,635 23.5 +0.7
Majority 291 2.6 −1.1
Turnout 5,646 86.5 +1.0 (est)
Registered electors 6,527
Conservative hold Swing −0.6
Conservative hold Swing −0.6
General election 1886: Devonport[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Puleston 2,954 30.2 +3.9
Conservative George Price 2,943 30.1 +3.6
Liberal Charles W Ford[33] 1,963 20.1 −3.6
Liberal Herbert Lionel Showers 1,918 19.6 −3.9
Majority 980 10.0 +7.4
Turnout 4,936 75.6 −10.9
Registered electors 6,527
Conservative hold Swing +3.8
Conservative hold Swing +3.8

Elections in the 1890sEdit

 
Kearley
General election 1892: Devonport[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hudson Kearley 3,354 26.4 +6.3
Liberal E. J. C. Morton 3,325 26.3 +6.7
Conservative George Price 3,012 23.8 −6.3
Conservative Robert Harvey 2,972 23.5 −6.7
Majority 313 2.5 N/A
Turnout 6,378 (est) 83.6 +8.0
Registered electors 7,629
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +6.3
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing +6.7
 
Morton
General election 1895: Devonport[31][32][34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hudson Kearley 3,570 26.2 −0.2
Liberal E. J. C. Morton 3,511 25.7 −0.6
Conservative Pridham Henry Pridham Whippell 3,303 24.2 +0.4
Conservative TU Thynne 3,263 23.9 +0.4
Majority 208 1.5 −1.0
Turnout 6,875 (est) 86.9 +3.3
Registered electors 7,911
Liberal hold Swing −0.3
Liberal hold Swing −0.5

Elections in the 1900sEdit

General election 1900: Devonport[31][32][34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hudson Kearley 3,626 25.9 −0.3
Liberal E. J. C. Morton 3,538 25.2 −0.5
Conservative John Lockie 3,458 24.7 +0.5
Conservative F McCormick Goodheart 3,394 24.2 +0.3
Majority 80 0.5 −1.0
Turnout 85.1 −1.8
Registered electors 8,351
Liberal hold Swing −0.4
Liberal hold Swing −0.4
1902 Devonport by-election[35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Lockie 3,785 50.2 +1.3
Liberal Thomas Brassey 3,757 49.8 −1.3
Majority 28 0.4 N/A
Turnout 7,542 84.3 −0.8
Registered electors 8,946
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +1.3
 
John Benn
1904 Devonport by-election[35]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal John Benn 6,219 54.6 +3.5
Conservative John Jackson 5,179 45.4 −3.5
Majority 1,040 9.2 +8.7
Turnout 11,398 79.3 −5.8
Registered electors 14,379
Liberal hold Swing +3.5
General election 1906: Devonport[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hudson Kearley 6,923 29.1 +3.2
Liberal John Benn 6,527 27.5 +2.3
Conservative John Jackson 5,239 22.0 −2.7
Conservative F Holme-Summer 5,080 21.4 −2.8
Majority 1,288 5.5 +5.0
Turnout 81.4 −3.7
Registered electors 14,978
Liberal hold Swing +3.0
Liberal hold Swing +2.5

Elections in the 1910sEdit

General election January 1910: Devonport[31][32][36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Jackson 5,658 26.7 +4.7
Conservative Clement Kinloch-Cooke 5,286 24.9 +3.5
Liberal John Benn 5,146 24.2 −3.3
Liberal Samuel Lithgow[37] 5,140 24.2 −4.9
Majority 140 0.7 N/A
Turnout 89.2 +7.8
Registered electors 12,125
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +4.0
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +4.2
 
Godfrey Baring
General election December 1910: Devonport[31][32][36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative John Jackson 5,170 26.0 −0.7
Conservative Clement Kinloch-Cooke 5,111 25.7 +0.8
Liberal Samuel Lithgow 4,841 24.3 +0.1
Liberal Godfrey Baring 4,782 24.0 −0.2
Majority 270 1.4 +0.7
Turnout 83.0 −6.2
Registered electors 12,125
Conservative hold Swing −0.4
Conservative hold Swing +0.5

General Election 1914/15:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1915. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place and by the July 1914, the following candidates had been selected;

General election 1918
Party Candidate Votes % ±
C Unionist Clement Kinloch-Cooke 13,240 62.2 +10.5
Labour Fred Bramley 4,115 19.3 N/A
Liberal Samuel Lithgow 3,930 18.5 −19.8
Majority 9,125 42.9 +41.5
Turnout 21,285 67.2 −15.8
Unionist hold Swing +15.2
C indicates candidate endorsed by the coalition government.

Elections in the 1920sEdit

General election 1922: Plymouth Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Unionist Clement Kinloch-Cooke 10,459 42.3
Liberal Leslie Hore-Belisha 8,538 34.5
Labour Barrington Bates 5,742 23.2
Majority 1,921 7.8
Turnout 79.1
Unionist hold Swing
General election 1923: Plymouth Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Leslie Hore-Belisha 12,269 45.7 +11.2
Unionist Clement Kinloch-Cooke 10,428 38.8 -3.5
Labour Joseph Harris 4,158 15.5 -7.7
Majority 1,841 6.9 -0.9
Turnout 82.7 +3.6
Liberal gain from Unionist Swing +7.3
General election 1924: Plymouth Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Leslie Hore-Belisha 11,115 39.7
Unionist Samuel Gluckstein 10,534 37.6
Labour Holford Knight 6,350 22.7
Majority 581 2.1 -4.8
Turnout 84.4
Liberal hold Swing -2.4
General election 1929: Plymouth Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Leslie Hore-Belisha 15,233 45.7 +6.0
Unionist Samuel Gluckstein 10,688 32.0 -5.6
Labour Donald Beaton Fraser 7,428 22.3 -0.4
Majority 4,545 13.7 +11.6
Turnout 82.3 -2.1
Liberal hold Swing +5.8

Elections in the 1930sEdit

General election 1931: Plymouth Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal National Leslie Hore-Belisha 23,459 72.19
Labour Paul Reed 9,039 27.81
Majority 14,420 44.37
Turnout 78.18
Liberal National hold Swing
General election 1935: Plymouth Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal National Leslie Hore-Belisha 20,852 68.13
Labour John Brown 9,756 31.87
Majority 11,096 36.25
Turnout 72.27
Liberal National hold Swing

General Election 1939/40:

Another General Election was required to take place before the end of 1940. The political parties had been making preparations for an election to take place from 1939 and by the end of this year, the following candidates had been selected;

Elections in the 1940sEdit

General election 1945: Plymouth Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Michael Foot 13,395 54.06
National Leslie Hore-Belisha 11,382 45.94
Majority 2,013 8.12
Turnout 71.11
Labour gain from Liberal National Swing

Elections in the 1950sEdit

General election 1950: Plymouth, Devonport[38]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Michael Foot 30,812 50.59
Conservative and National Liberal Randolph Churchill 27,329 44.87
Liberal Alfred Charles Cann 2,766 4.54
Majority 3,483 5.72
Turnout 87.16
Labour hold Swing
General election 1951: Plymouth, Devonport[39]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Michael Foot 32,158 51.93
Conservative and National Liberal Randolph Churchill 29,768 48.07
Majority 2,390 3.86
Turnout 85.28
Labour hold Swing
General election 1955: Plymouth, Devonport[40]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative and National Liberal Joan Vickers 24,821 47.15
Labour Michael Foot 24,721 46.96
Liberal Arthur Russell Mayne 3,100 5.89
Majority 100 0.19
Turnout 77.15
Conservative and National Liberal gain from Labour Swing
General election 1959: Plymouth, Devonport[41]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative and National Liberal Joan Vickers 28,481 56.39
Labour Michael Foot 22,027 43.61
Majority 6,454 12.78
Turnout 78.63
Conservative and National Liberal hold Swing

Elections in the 1960sEdit

General election 1964: Plymouth, Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Joan Vickers 24,241 54.04
Labour Rowland Edward Crabb 20,615 45.96
Majority 3,626 8.08
Turnout 73.58
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1966: Plymouth, Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Joan Vickers 22,760 50.35
Labour Rowland Edward Crabb 22,441 49.65
Majority 319 0.71
Turnout 76.21
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970sEdit

General election 1970: Plymouth, Devonport
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Joan Vickers 21,843 51.62
Labour F Keith Taylor 20,471 48.38
Majority 1,372 3.24
Turnout 70.95
Conservative hold Swing
General election February 1974: Plymouth, Devonport[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour David Owen 15,819 42.2
Conservative Joan Vickers 15,382 41.0
Liberal N E Westbrook 6,298 16.8
Majority 437 1.2
Turnout 75.3
Labour gain from Conservative Swing
General election October 1974: Plymouth, Devonport[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour David Owen 17,398 47.3 +5.1
Conservative Joan Vickers 15,139 41.1 +0.1
Liberal N E Westbrook 3,953 10.7 -6.1
Independent Liberal J N Hill 312 0.9 N/A
Majority 2,259 6.1
Turnout 73.5 -1.8
Labour hold Swing
General election 1979: Plymouth, Devonport[42]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour David Owen 16,545 47.4 +0.1
Conservative Kenneth Hughes 15,544 44.6 +3.5
Liberal Michael James 2,360 6.8 −3.9
National Front Leonard Bearsford-Walker 243 0.7 N/A
Independent Richard Stoner 203 0.6 N/A
Majority 1,001 2.9
Turnout 34,895 72.3 −1.2
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1980sEdit

General election 1983: Plymouth, Devonport[43][44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Social Democratic David Owen 20,843 44.3
Conservative Ann Widdecombe 15,907 33.8
Labour Julian Priestley 9,845 21.0
Ind. Conservative James Sullivan 292 0.6
BNP Robert Bearsford-Walker 72 0.2
Christian Democrat Faith Hill 51 0.1
Majority 4,936 10.5
Turnout 47,010 76.1
Social Democratic gain from Labour
  • This constituency underwent boundary changes between the 1979 and 1983 general elections and thus calculation of change in vote share is not meaningful.
General election 1987: Plymouth, Devonport[45][44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Social Democratic David Owen 21,039 42.3 −2.0
Conservative Tom Jones 14,569 29.3 −4.5
Labour Ian Flintoff 14,166 28.4 +7.4
Majority 6,470 13.0
Turnout 49,774 77.2
Social Democratic hold Swing

Elections in the 1990sEdit

General election 1992: Plymouth, Devonport[46][44][47]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour David Jamieson 24,953 48.7 +20.3
Conservative Keith Simpson 17,541 34.3 +5.0
Liberal Democrat Murdoch MacTaggart 6,315 12.3 −30.0
SDP Harold Luscombe 2,152 4.2 −38.1
Natural Law Francis Lyons 255 0.5 N/A
Majority 7,412 14.4 +1.4
Turnout 51,216 77.8 +0.6
Labour gain from Social Democratic Swing +7.7
General election 1997: Plymouth, Devonport[48][49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour David Jamieson 31,629 60.9 +13.8
Conservative Anthony Johnson 12,562 24.2 −11.4
Liberal Democrat Richard Corpus 5,570 10.7 −2.5
Referendum Clive Norsworthy 1,486 2.9 N/A
UKIP Caroline Farrand 478 0.9 N/A
National Democrats Stephen Ebbs 238 0.4 N/A
Majority 19,067 36.7
Turnout 51,963 69.8
Labour hold Swing +12.6

This constituency underwent boundary changes between the 1992 and 1997 general elections and thus change in share of vote is based on a notional calculation.

Elections in the 2000sEdit

General election 2001: Plymouth, Devonport[50][49]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour David Jamieson 24,322 58.3 −2.6
Conservative John Glen 11,289 27.1 +2.9
Liberal Democrat Keith Baldry 4,513 10.8 +0.1
UKIP Michael Parker 958 2.3 +1.4
Socialist Alliance Tony Staunton 334 0.8 N/A
Socialist Labour Rob Hawkins 303 0.7 N/A
Majority 13,033 31.2
Turnout 41,719 56.6 −13.1
Labour hold Swing −2.7
General election 2005: Plymouth, Devonport[51][52]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Alison Seabeck 18,612 44.3 −14.0
Conservative Richard Cuming 10,509 25.0 −2.1
Liberal Democrat Judith Jolly 8,000 19.1 +8.3
UKIP Bill Wakeham 3,324 7.9 +5.6
Independent Keith Greene 747 1.8 N/A
Socialist Labour Rob Hawkins 445 1.1 +0.4
Respect Tony Staunton 376 0.9 N/A
Majority 8,101 19.3
Turnout 41,982 57.6 +1.0
Labour hold Swing −6.0

See alsoEdit

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. ^ "Final recommendations for Parliamentary constituencies in the counties of Devon, Plymouth and Torbay". Boundary Commission for England. 24 November 2004. Archived from the original on 2 November 2009. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  2. ^ Waller, Robert; Criddle, Byron (2007). The Almanac of British Politics (8th ed.). UK: Routledge. p. 750. ISBN 0-415-37823-0.
  3. ^ a b c Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "D" (part 2)
  4. ^ a b c d e Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 68–69. ISBN 0-900178-13-2.
  5. ^ One of No Party (1836). Random Recollections of the House of Commons from the Year 1830 to the Close of 1835, Including Personal Sketches of the Leading Members of All Parties. Philadelphia: E. L. Carey & A. Hart. pp. 158–159. Retrieved 2 November 2018 – via Google Books.
  6. ^ Creighton, Mandell (1890). "Grey, George (1799-1882)" . In Stephen, Leslie; Lee, Sidney (eds.). Dictionary of National Biography. 23. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
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  49. ^ a b Election results, 1997 – 2001
  50. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  51. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  52. ^ Election result, 2005

Craig, F. W. S. (1983). British parliamentary election results 1918–1949 (3 ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. ISBN 0-900178-06-X.

Coordinates: 50°25′N 4°08′W / 50.41°N 4.14°W / 50.41; -4.14