Perses of Colchis

In Greek mythology, Perses (/ˈpɜːrsiz/; Ancient Greek: Πέρσης, romanizedPérsēs, lit.'destroyer') is the brother of Aeëtes, Aloeus, Circe and Pasiphaë, which makes him a son of Helios, the god of the sun, by Perse, an Oceanid nymph.[1]

Perses
King of Colchis
King of Colchis
PredecessorAeëtes
SuccessorMedus
WifeNone
IssueHecate (rare)
FatherHelios
MotherPerse

EtymologyEdit

His name is derived from the Ancient Greek word perthō (πέρθω – "to sack", "to ravage", "to destroy").

MythologyEdit

Perses' brother Aeëtes had been warned by an oracle that great peril would come to him if the golden fleece was ever removed from Colchis.[2] Indeed, after Medea helped Jason steal the fleece, Perses usurped the throne of Colchis from his brother, but was subsequently slain by Medea, his paternal niece, who restored her father to the throne,[3] as an oracle had once predicted that he would be slain by his own kin.[4]

One tale goes that after Perses seized power, Medea's son by either Aegeus or Jason,[5] Medus, arrived in Colchis and was imprisoned immediately, though under a false identity. Soon after a famine broke out. Medea arrived in Colchis too, claiming to be a priestess of Artemis, and unknowingly, betrayed her son's true identity to Perses. Medea, under the pretext of simply wanting to talk to him, secretly gave Medus a sword, and explained what had happened to his grandfather Aeëtes. Medus then slew Perses.[4][6]

Although distinct from the Titan known as Perses, who is known for fathering Hecate, the goddess of witchcraft, Diodorus Siculus in his Bibliotheca historica made this Perses the father of Hecate by an unknown mother; Perses' brother Aeëtes then married Hecate and had Medea and Circe by her.[7] Diodorus describes Perses as "exceedingly cruel" and "lawless".

Regnal titles
Preceded by King of Colchis Succeeded by

GenealogyEdit

Perses's family tree
Gaia
Uranus
HyperionTheiaOceanusTethys
HeliosPerse
CirceAeëtesPasiphaëPERSESAloeus

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit