Perses (Titan)

In Greek mythology, Perses (/ˈpɜːrsiz/; Ancient Greek: Πέρσης, romanizedPérsēs, lit.''destroyer'') is the son of the Titan Crius and Eurybia, and thus brother to Astraeus and Pallas.[1][2] Ancient tradition records very little of Perses other than his marriage and offspring, his role largely being purely genealogical, existing merely to provide a parentage for other, more important figures.

Perses
Personal information
ParentsCrius and Eurybia
SiblingsPallas and Astraeus
ConsortAsteria
ChildrenHecate, Chariclo

EtymologyEdit

His name is derived from the Ancient Greek word perthō (πέρθω – "to sack", "to ravage", "to destroy").

MythologyEdit

Hesiod describes Perses as "eminent among all men in wisdom."[1] He was wed to Asteria, the daughter of Phoebe and Coeus,[3][2] with whom he had one child, Hecate, honoured by Zeus above all others as the goddess of magic, crossroads, and witchcraft. He might be the Perses that is the father of Chariclo, the wife of Chiron, in some versions.[4]

He was confused with another Perses (the son of the sun god Helios and Perse), who was made the father of Hecate in some versions.[5]

Family treeEdit

Family of Eurybia and Crius
PontusGaiaUranus
EurybiaCrius
AstraeusEosPersesAsteriaPallasStyx
BoreasAstraeaPhainonHecateZelusScylla
NotusPhaethonNikeFontes
EurusPyroeisKratosLacus
ZephyrusEosphorusBia
Stilbon

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

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