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Charles Patrick Fleeming Jenkin, Baron Jenkin of Roding, PC (7 September 1926[1] – 20 December 2016) was a British Conservative politician who served as a cabinet minister in Margaret Thatcher's first government.


The Lord Jenkin of Roding

Patrick Jenkin in 1966
Secretary of State for the Environment
In office
12 June 1983 – 2 September 1985
Prime MinisterMargaret Thatcher
Preceded byTom King
Succeeded byKenneth Baker
Secretary of State for Industry
In office
14 September 1981 – 12 June 1983
Prime MinisterMargaret Thatcher
Preceded byKeith Joseph
Succeeded byCecil Parkinson (n.b.)
Secretary of State for Health and Social Services
In office
4 May 1979 – 14 September 1981
Prime MinisterMargaret Thatcher
Preceded byDavid Ennals
Succeeded byNorman Fowler
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
In office
7 April 1972 – 8 January 1974
Prime MinisterEdward Heath
Preceded byMaurice Macmillan
Succeeded byTom Boardman
Financial Secretary to the Treasury
In office
19 June 1970 – 7 April 1972
Prime MinisterEdward Heath
Preceded byDick Taverne
Succeeded byTerence Higgns
Member of Parliament
for Wanstead and Woodford
In office
15 October 1964 – 18 May 1987
Preceded byConstituency established
Succeeded byJames Arbuthnot
Shadow Cabinet positions
Shadow Secretary of State for Health and Social Services
In office
19 November 1976 – 4 May 1979
LeaderMargaret Thatcher
Preceded byNorman Fowler
Succeeded byStan Orme
Shadow Secretary of State for Energy
In office
18 February 1975 – 19 November 1976
LeaderMargaret Thatcher
Succeeded byJohn Biffen
Personal details
Born
Charles Patrick Fleeming Jenkin

(1926-09-07)7 September 1926
Edinburgh, Scotland
Died20 December 2016(2016-12-20) (aged 90)
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England
NationalityBritish
Political partyConservative
Spouse(s)
Monica Jenkin (m. 1950)
Children4 (including Bernard)
Alma mater
n.b. ^ Secretary of State for Trade and Industry

Life and careerEdit

Jenkin was educated at the Dragon School in Oxford, Clifton College in Bristol and Jesus College, Cambridge. He became a barrister, called by the Middle Temple in 1952, and company director. He was a councillor on Hornsey Borough Council from 1960 to 1963.

The following year, Jenkin became the Conservative Member of Parliament for Wanstead and Woodford. From 1965, he served as an Opposition spokesman on economic and trade affairs. He was a member of the Bow Group from 1951.[2] In January 1974, he became Minister for Energy just weeks before the Conservatives fell from office, and participated in many ways in the government of Margaret Thatcher. He served as Secretary of State for Social Services from 1979 to 1981, then as Secretary of State for Industry until 1983, and finally as Secretary of State for the Environment from 1983 to 1985.

Jenkin retired from the Commons at the 1987 general election. He was elevated to the House of Lords as a life peer with the title Baron Jenkin of Roding, of Wanstead and Woodford in Greater London.[1][3][4] Whilst in the Lords, Jenkin was interviewed in 2012 as part of The History of Parliament's oral history project.[5] He was noted for his contribution to the debate during the passage of the Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act 2013.[6] On 6 January 2015 he retired from the House of Lords pursuant to section 1 of the House of Lords Reform Act 2014.[7] He died on 20 December 2016, aged 90.[8][9]

Jenkin was president of the Foundation for Science and Technology, and a vice-president of the Local Government Association.[2] His son, Bernard, is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Harwich and North Essex. Lord Jenkin's grandfather, Frewen, was the first Professor of Engineering Science at the University of Oxford from 1908 in the newly created Department of Engineering Science, and the namesake of the Jenkin Building at Oxford. Lord Jenkin's great-grandfather was the scientist Fleeming Jenkin.

ArmsEdit

Coat of arms of Patrick Jenkin
Coronet
Coronet of a baron
Crest
On a Mural Crown per pale Argent and Sable a Lion rampant reguardant Sable armed and langued Gules
Escutcheon
Argent a Lion rampant reguardant Sable armed and langued Gules within a Bordure also Sable
Supporters
Dexter: a Seal erect on a Rock; Sinister: a Stag erect on a Grassy Mount, all proper
Motto
Toujours Fidele (Always faithful) [10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Charles Patrick Fleeming Jenkin, Baron Jenkin of Roding". thePeerage.com. Retrieved 1 August 2009.
  2. ^ a b "UK Parliament Biography". Parliament.uk.
  3. ^ "No. 51014". The London Gazette (Supplement). 30 July 1987. pp. 1–2.
  4. ^ "No. 51113". The London Gazette. 6 November 1987. p. 1.
  5. ^ "Oral history: JENKIN, Patrick (b.1926)". The History of Parliament. Retrieved 14 July 2016.
  6. ^ "Lord Jenkin: I was taught that condemning a homosexual is the same as condemning someone with red hair". PinkNews. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  7. ^ "Lords Hansard text for 06 Jan 2015 (pt 0001)". publications.parliament.uk.
  8. ^ Elgot, Jessica (21 December 2016). "Former Tory minister Lord Jenkin dies aged 90". The Guardian. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  9. ^ "Former Cabinet minister Lord Jenkin dies". Sky News. Retrieved 21 December 2016.
  10. ^ "Life Peerages - J".

External linksEdit

Parliament of the United Kingdom
New constituency Member of Parliament for Wanstead and Woodford
19641987
Succeeded by
James Arbuthnot
Political offices
Preceded by
Dick Taverne
Financial Secretary to the Treasury
1970–1972
Succeeded by
Terence Higgins
Preceded by
Maurice Macmillan
Chief Secretary to the Treasury
1972–1974
Succeeded by
Tom Boardman
Preceded by
David Ennals
Secretary of State for Health and Social Services
1979–1981
Succeeded by
Norman Fowler
Preceded by
Keith Joseph
Secretary of State for Industry
1981–1983
Succeeded by
Cecil Parkinson
as Secretary of State for Trade and Industry
Preceded by
Tom King
Secretary of State for the Environment
1983–1985
Succeeded by
Kenneth Baker