Paste (magazine)

Paste is a monthly music and entertainment digital magazine, headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia,[1] with studios in Atlanta and Manhattan,[2] and owned by Paste Media Group. The magazine began as a website in 1998. It ran as a print publication from 2002 to 2010 before converting to online-only.[3]

Paste
PasteMag.jpg
EditorJosh Jackson
CategoriesOnline, American music
FrequencyDigital, monthly
PublisherPaste Media Group
First issueJuly 2002; 19 years ago (2002-07)
Final issueAugust 31, 2010 (2010-08-31) (print)
CountryUnited States
Based in2852 E College Ave.
Decatur, Georgia, U.S.[1]
LanguageEnglish
Websitepastemagazine.com
ISSN1540-3106

HistoryEdit

The magazine was founded[4][5] as a quarterly in July 2002 and was owned[6] by Josh Jackson,[7] Nick Purdy,[8][9] and Tim Regan-Porter.[10][11][12]

In October 2007, the magazine tried the "Radiohead" experiment, offering new and current subscribers the ability to pay what they wanted for a one-year subscription to Paste.[13][3] The subscriber base increased by 28,000, but Paste president Tim Regan-Porter noted the model was not sustainable; he hoped the new subscribers would renew the following year at the current rates and the increase in web traffic would attract additional subscribers and advertisers.[14]

Amidst an economic downturn, Paste began to suffer from lagging ad revenue,[15] as did other magazine publishers in 2008 and 2009.[3] On May 14, 2009, Paste editors announced a plan to save the magazine, by pleading to its readers, musicians and celebrities for contributions.[16] Cost-cutting by the magazine did not stem the losses.[17] The crux cited for the financial troubles was the lack of advertiser spending.[3]

In 2009, Paste launched an hour-long TV pilot for Halogen TV called Pop Goes the Culture.[18]

On August 31, 2010, Paste suspended the print magazine, but continues publication as the online PasteMagazine.com.[3][19]

ContentEdit

Its tagline is "Signs of Life in Music, Film and Culture".[20] Paste's initial focus was music, covering a variety of genres with an emphasis on adult album alternative, Americana and indie rock, along with independent film and books. Each issue originally included a CD music sampler but was dropped in favor of digital downloading as a Going-Green initiative. Featured artists included Paul McCartney, Ryan Adams, Blackalicious, Regina Spektor, The Whigs, Fiona Apple, The Decemberists, Mark Heard, Woven Hand, Milton and the Devils Party,[21][failed verification] Liam Finn, The Trolleyvox, and Thom Yorke. Many of these artists also contributed to the Campaign to Save Paste.[22][failed verification]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Masthead". Paste. October 6, 2008. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  2. ^ "About". Paste. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e Turner, Dorie (September 1, 2010). "Paste music magazine to stop print publication". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Associated Press. Archived from the original on March 12, 2017. Retrieved March 12, 2017.
  4. ^ Lyons, Gabe (2010). The Next Christians: Seven Ways You Can Live the Gospel and Restore the World. WaterBrook Multnomah. ISBN 978-0385529846. LCCN 2010006089. Retrieved November 5, 2018 – via Google Books.[page needed]
  5. ^ Daire, Seth (February 29, 2008). "Spotlight: Paste Magazine". The Christian Imagination. Archived from the original on November 5, 2018. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  6. ^ Welton, Caysey (September 1, 2010). "Paste Succumbs to Debt, Suspends Print Magazine". Folio. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  7. ^ Jackson, Josh. "Josh Jackson – Paste Magazine Journalist". Retrieved November 5, 2018 – via Muck Rack.
  8. ^ Sturdivant, Jim (September 1, 2011). "My (Re)generation: Paste's Nick Purdy on the Fall and Rise of a Music Magazine". Publishing Executive. Archived from the original on August 20, 2019. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  9. ^ "Paste Magazine Puts All Bets On The Internet". Here and Now. WBUR. August 19, 2011. Archived from the original on November 5, 2018. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  10. ^ "McClatchy names Regan-Porter as new South region editor". Associated Press. June 12, 2018. Archived from the original on June 17, 2018. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  11. ^ Regan-Porter, Tim (January 17, 2018). "Part 1: My long journey to Stanford". Archived from the original on November 5, 2018. Retrieved November 5, 2018 – via Medium.
  12. ^ Grant, Drew (January 12, 2010). "Paste Magazine Thrives Through Belt-Tightening". Adweek. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  13. ^ Stableford, Dylan (October 29, 2007). "Following Radiohead, Paste to Let Subscribers Name Their Own Price". Folio. Archived from the original on November 17, 2016. Retrieved May 17, 2009.
  14. ^ Stableford, Dylan (January 4, 2008). "Paste President: Radiohead Experiment 'A Huge Success'". Folio. Archived from the original on November 17, 2016. Retrieved May 17, 2009.
  15. ^ Nolan, Hamilton (September 9, 2010). "Paste Magazine Freelancers Are Getting Screwed". Gawker. Archived from the original on November 5, 2013. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  16. ^ Stableford, Dylan (May 14, 2009). "Paste Launches Campaign to Save its Magazine". Folio. Archived from the original on November 17, 2016. Retrieved May 17, 2009.
  17. ^ Maddux, Rachael (September 3, 2010). "Paste magazine: Inside the death of a music indie". Salon. Archived from the original on September 24, 2010. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  18. ^ Jackson, Josh (October 26, 2009). "New Paste TV Show Debuts Tonight!". Paste. Archived from the original on January 30, 2010. Retrieved November 7, 2013.
  19. ^ Nolan, Hamilton (September 1, 2010). "Paste Magazine Is Dead". Gawker. Archived from the original on August 27, 2011. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  20. ^ "Signs of Life in Music, Film and Culture". Paste. Retrieved May 17, 2009.
  21. ^ Whitman, Andy (February 5, 2007). "Fountains of Wayne, Joe Craven, Milton and the Devils Party, Jon Rauhouse". Paste. Archived from the original on October 4, 2015. Retrieved November 5, 2018.
  22. ^ Stableford, Dylan (May 21, 2009). "'Save Paste' Campaign Raises $166,000". Folio. Archived from the original on January 13, 2018. Retrieved May 21, 2009.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit