Ohio Cannon

The Ohio Cannon, also known as the Toledo Cannon, were a professional American football team that played during the 1999 season as part of the Regional Football League. They played their home games at the Glass Bowl in Toledo, Ohio.

Ohio Cannon
RFL Ohio Cannon helmet.png
Founded1998
Folded1999
LeagueRegional Football League
Based inToledo, Ohio
StadiumGlass Bowl
Head coach
  • Darrell Farmer (2 games)
  • Ken James

The team was announced as one of the league's charter members on November 12, 1998.[1] For their lone season, Darrell Farmer was named as head coach; he resigned in late April, after two regular season games, stating that he had not been paid per his contract.[2] Farmer was succeeded by Ken James.[3][4]

Although the team was scheduled to play a 12-game regular season, poor attendance and sagging revenues would prove too much for the new league. The Cannon played to a 2–4 record in their first six games.[5] One of their wins came over the league-leading Mobile Admirals in a game played in Charleston, West Virginia, as Cannon quarterback Major Harris had played college football for the West Virginia Mountaineers.[6]

The Cannon's planned seventh game of the season was cancelled by the league due to financial difficulties. The league adjusted schedules for the eighth week of the season, and when the Shreveport Knights did not travel to play the Cannon in Toledo, the league forfeited the game to Ohio.[7] The regular season was ended by the league at that point, and the Cannon's 3–4 record made them the fourth seed in the four-team postseason.

Prior to Ohio's playoff game against top-seeded Mobile, Cannon players refused to take the field without financial concessions from ownership. After a delay of approximately 30 minutes past the scheduled start time, an agreement was reached and the game was played.[8] Although the Cannon scored first, they were soundly defeated, 35–14.[9] After the season, the team and the league ceased operation.

1999 season scheduleEdit

 
Cannon quarterback Major Harris
Date Opponent Site W/L Score Attnd. Ref.
April 18 Houston Outlaws Home L 17–18 [10]
April 25 New Orleans Thunder Home W 34–0 [11]
May 1 Shreveport Knights Away L 13–29 [12]
May 8 Mississippi Pride Away L 17–20 3,500 [3]
May 15 Houston Outlaws Away L 3–27 [13]
May 22 Mobile Admirals Home  W 20–17 [6]
May 29 New Orleans Thunder Away cancelled [14]
June 6  Shreveport Knights Home W forfeit [7]
Playoffs
June 12 Mobile Admirals Away L 14–35 2,873 [9][8]

  Ohio had been scheduled to host Mississippi on June 6. When Shreveport was unable to use their stadium to host New Orleans on June 5, the league adjusted schedules.[15] Mississippi would host New Orleans on June 5, and Ohio would host Shreveport on June 6. When Shreveport did not travel to Toledo, a forfeit was assessed.[16]
  May 22 game played in Charleston, West Virginia.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "League". Remember the RFL. Retrieved January 25, 2019 – via Google Sites.
  2. ^ McCloskey, John (April 28, 1999). "Ohio RFL coach quits team over lack of pay". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 1. Retrieved January 28, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b Goolsby, Henry (May 9, 1999). "Pride overcomes 10-point deficit to edge Cannon". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. p. 31. Retrieved January 26, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Monroe, Mark (August 14, 2011). "10 questions with Ken James". Toledo Blade. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
  5. ^ "RFL Standings". Pensacola News Journal. Pensacola, Florida. May 28, 1999. p. 50. Retrieved January 28, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b c "On the field: Admirals Beaten". Pensacola News Journal. Pensacola, Florida. May 23, 1999. p. 41. Retrieved January 26, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  7. ^ a b McCloskey, John (June 7, 1999). "RFL to begin playoffs without Knights". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 15. Retrieved January 23, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b Cleveland, Rick (June 15, 1999). "Player mutiny almost torpedoed 1 RFL semifinal". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. p. 23. Retrieved January 27, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  9. ^ a b Haller, Doug (June 13, 1999). "Admirals start slowly, zoom to finals". Pensacola News Journal. p. 1D. Retrieved January 26, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  10. ^ McCloskey, John (April 23, 1999). "RFL moving headquarters to Mobile, Ala". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 27. Retrieved January 27, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  11. ^ McCloskey, John (April 28, 1999). "New Orleans replaces coach with former Saints running back". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 28. Retrieved January 25, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  12. ^ McCloskey, John (May 2, 1999). "Knights return to form in victory". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 45. Retrieved January 24, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Weekly Results". Remember the RFL. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  14. ^ "Knights fall to Houston". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. June 1, 1999. p. 14. Retrieved January 23, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  15. ^ Goolsby, Henry (June 4, 1999). "Pride, RFL try to adjust". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 17. Retrieved January 27, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  16. ^ Goolsby, Henry (June 9, 1999). "Pride relishes change to apprehend Outlaws". The Clarion-Ledger. Jackson, Mississippi. p. 23. Retrieved January 23, 2019 – via newspapers.com.

External linksEdit