Nikola Poposki

Nikola Poposki (born 24 October 1977 in Skopje) was Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Macedonia until 31 May 2017. Prior to that role, in 2010–2011 he served as the country's ambassador to the European Union.[1][2]

Nikola Poposki
Nikola Poposki in Tallinn (8th February 2012) (cropped).jpg
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
28 July 2011 – 31 May 2017
Prime MinisterNikola Gruevski
Preceded byAntonio Milošoski
Succeeded byNikola Dimitrov
Personal details
Born (1977-10-24) 24 October 1977 (age 44)
Skopje, SR Macedonia, SFR Yugoslavia
(now North Macedonia)
Political partyVMRO-DPMNE
Alma materUniversity of Skopje
College of Europe

EducationEdit

Nikola Poposki received a BA in Economics from Skopje University and from Nice University in 2002 and a Master in Languages and International Trade in the EU from Skopje University and Rennes University in 2004.[3] He later received a master's degree from the College of Europe.[4][5][6][7]

CareerEdit

Foreign policyEdit

Speaking to the Israel Council on Foreign Relations in March 2016, Poposki addressed, in his capacity as Foreign Minister, the recent critiques of the international press with regards to his country's handling of the migrant crisis. He stated: "We’re willing to give them humane treatment and safe transit, but no way will we take the burden for problems that the EU is not ready to resolve," referring to the directives demanded of European countries onto Macedonia even though the latter has been refused so far membership to either the European Community or to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.[8]

Awards and decorationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Government of the Republic of Macedonia. "The Minister". Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 17 February 2012.
  2. ^ College of Europe | Collège d'Europe News - Appointment of Mr Nikola POPOSKI (Montesquieu Promotion - 2004‐2005) as Minister of Foreign Affairs of Republic of Macedonia
  3. ^ Government of the Republic of Macedonia. "The Minister". Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 17 February 2012.
  4. ^ Jonathan Oliver (25 April 2010). "Which way will Nick Clegg turn?". The Times. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  5. ^ "Charlemagne: Free the Strasbourg 626". The Economist. 5 February 2004. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  6. ^ Tony Barber (20 April 2010). "Europe in joyous disbelief over Nick Clegg and the Lib Dems". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 17 September 2011. Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  7. ^ Government of Macedonia Bio
  8. ^ "Macedonia can't solve problems of migration crisis for EU, FM says". The Jerusalem Post. 11 March 2016. Retrieved 13 March 2014.
  9. ^ http://republika.mk/605837

External linksEdit

Political offices
Preceded by Minister of Foreign Affairs
2011–2017
Succeeded by