Nicolás Todero

Nicolás Todero (Spanish pronunciation: [nikoˈlas toˈðeɾo]; born 15 April 1979) is a former professional tennis player from Argentina.

Nicolás Todero
Full nameNicolás Todero
Country (sports) Argentina
ResidenceMiami, U.S.
Born (1979-04-15) 15 April 1979 (age 41)
La Plata, Argentina
Height183 cm (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro1998
Retired2009
PlaysRight handed
Prize moneyUS$188,600
Singles
Career record0–1
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo. 219 (29 November 2004)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian OpenQ2 (2005)
French OpenQ1 (2005)
WimbledonQ3 (2008)
US OpenQ1 (2005)
Doubles
Highest rankingNo. 241 (15 September 2003)
Last updated on: 8 July 2017.

BiographyEdit

Todero was born in La Plata, son of Jorge, a tennis coach who later served as Argentina's Fed Cup captain for several years.[1]

Professional careerEdit

Based in Florida, Todero began competing professionally in 1998. At a Futures event in Vero Beach in 1999 he beat a young Andy Roddick in straight sets. It was Roddick first appearance in a Futures main draw, which gives Todero the distinction of being the first player to ever defeat the American in a professional match.[2] In 2000 Todero started featuring at Challenger level, a format he won many matches in over the years without ever progressing to a final. He was however runner-up in the doubles at two Challenger tournaments as a doubles player and won ten singles titles in Futures. In 2002 he qualified for his only ATP Tour event, the Swiss Open in Gstaad, where he lost in the first round to Austria's Stefan Koubek.[3] He narrowly missed out on qualifying for the 2008 Wimbledon Championships, with a five set loss to Simon Stadler in the final qualifier.[4] His last year on the professional circuit was in 2009.

CoachingEdit

Todero now coaches for the USTA, through which he has worked closely with Stefan Kozlov and Frances Tiafoe. A former coach of Jesse Levine, Todero has been a USTA national coach since 2010.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "El argentino detrás de Melanie Oudin". ESPN.com (in Spanish). 18 June 2012. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  2. ^ "Vero Beach, Florida – Where Andy Roddick's Professional Tennis Career Began". World Tennis Magazine. 25 January 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  3. ^ "Costa eliminated in first round". United Press International. 9 July 2002. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  4. ^ "Nadal: "Wimbledon es un torneo muy especial"". La Nación (in Spanish). 20 June 2008. Retrieved 3 May 2017.
  5. ^ "Nicolas Todero - National Coach, Men's Tennis". United States Tennis Association. Retrieved 3 May 2017.

External linksEdit