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New York State Route 403 (NY 403) is a 2.27-mile (3.65 km) long state highway located entirely within Putnam County. It connects NY 9D in Philipstown at its northern end to US 9 in the hamlet of Graymoor, where the Appalachian Trail crosses both highways. At that intersection, NY 403 is signed as a route to the Bear Mountain Bridge. Half of its length is uphill going south.

New York State Route 403 marker

New York State Route 403
Cat Rock Road
Map of New York State Route 403
Map of Putnam County in southeastern New York with NY 403 highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by NYSDOT
Length2.27 mi[3] (3.65 km)
Existedmid-1930s[1][2]–present
Major junctions
South end US 9 in Philipstown
North end NY 9D in Philipstown
Location
CountiesPutnam
Highway system
NY 402NY 404

Route descriptionEdit

 
NY 403 begins here at NY 9D in Philipstown

NY 403 begins at an intersection with U.S. Route 9 (US 9) in the Philipstown hamlet of Graymoor. Also present at this intersection with the Appalachian Trail, which crosses US 9 at-grade. NY 403 heads up the hill overlook Graymoor to the west. NY 403 bends northwest at an old alignment of Cat Rock Road. Turning westward, NY 403 goes downhill past the Walker House, a house owned by Samuel Sloan, into the Highlands Country Club area of Philipstown. There, the route reaches an intersection with NY 9D. Present at this intersection is The Birches, a historic house built by Ralph Adams Cram. This marks the western terminus of NY 403. The road continues west as Putnam County Route 12, which descends into Garrison.[4]

HistoryEdit

The alignment of current NY 403 was known as the Cat Rock Road, named after a local rock where a wild cat was regularly spotted. In 1932, Putnam County added Cat Rock Road along with nine other historical road sites in the village of Cold Spring.[5] However the quality of Cat Rock Road was in rough shape in 1933. Despite some surveyors present in June 1933,[6] local pressure was followed by demands of the town of Philipstown to rebuild Cat Rock Road.[7] However reconstruction of the road became a political debate. Members of the Democratic Party urged reconstruction of the roadway, while the Republican Party stalled on the work.[8] In January 1934, Putnam County Board of Supervisors passed a resolution demanding that Cat Rock Road be surveyed. The primary use of Cat Rock Road was for those trying to get to NY 9D and avoid the Bear Mountain Bridge toll.[9]

On January 23, 1934, the Board of Supervisors looked at acquiring right-of-way for the reconstruction of Cat Rock Road.[10] On May 2, 1934, Cat Rock Road was added to the state highway map for reconstruction.[11] However, reconstruction was delayed constantly, including Herbert Lehman's veto of construction on NY 9D in May 1934. As a result, this also delayed funding the Cat Rock Road work.[12] Despite that, the local newspapers (The Beacon News and Peekskill Evening Star) endorsed construction of Cat Rock Road. They released editorials supporting the job noting that funding was available.[13] However, the state released bid requests for Cat Rock Road in October 1934.[14] Local residents were ready two weeks later to turn over some land for the reconstruction.[15]

However, construction did not start before the calendar switched to 1935. The rights-of-way were all acquired in April 1935, which changed the name legally from Cat Rock Road to Garrison–Peekskill Road. With the road falling apart, the construction was dependent on federal funds from the Works Progress Administration.[16][17] Despite the promising future, problems occurred in June 1935 noting that the State of New York had no money to fund construction and it would be requisite on all federal funds in July or August.[18] In August 1935, the state expected the okay from the government for funding of Cat Rock Road's reconstruction. They noted the state signed off on everything and was just waiting on the federal government.[19] Funding came through by September 1935, when bids were announced for the construction. These were led by A.E. Ottavino of Croton-on-Hudson for $152,697.70 (1935 USD). With the announcement of bids, it was expected that construction would begin in a few weeks.[20]

Construction began in October 1935 on the reconstruction of Cat Rock Road.[21] Construction progressed into 1936, with graving and excavation work for the new road, which had a slated completion date of December 31, 1936.[22] After a stoppage in work due to weather, construction resumed in March 1936 with the beginning of blast work.[23] The construction continued through June 1936, with the elimination of several tight curves and more retaining wall construction.[24] Grading was finished in early June,[25] and concrete pouring began in August.[26] On August 21, it was announced that Cat Rock Road would open to traffic on October 1, 1936.[27] On September 17, 1936, the concrete was finished.[28] Asphalt was applied to the intersections in September 1936 to help drivers.[29]

Despite the October 1 opening date, Cat Rock Road opened to both directions of traffic in late September 1936, despite some minimal work required to finish the 2.30-mile (3.70 km) road.[30]

The entirety of NY 403 was assigned at some point between 1933 and 1936.[1][2]

Major intersectionsEdit

The entire route is in Philipstown, Putnam County.

mi[3]kmDestinationsNotes
0.000.00     
    US 9 / US 6 Alt. east / US 202 Alt. east – Fishkill, Peekskill
Southern terminus of concurrency with US 6/202 Alternate
2.273.65     
    NY 9D / US 6 Alt. west / US 202 Alt. west – Bear Mountain Bridge, Cold Spring
Northern terminus of concurrency with US 6/202 Alternate
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Texas Oil Company; Rand McNally and Company (1933). Texaco Road Map: New York (Map). Texas Oil Company.[full citation needed]
  2. ^ a b Standard Oil Company; General Drafting (1936). New York (Map). Standard Oil Company.[full citation needed]
  3. ^ a b Highway Data Services Bureau (June 16, 2009). 2008 Traffic Data Report for New York State (PDF). New York State Department of Transportation. p. 308. Retrieved January 10, 2010.
  4. ^ Microsoft; Nokia (June 28, 2018). "Overview Map of NY 403" (Map). Bing Maps. Microsoft. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  5. ^ "Putnam Committee Marks Old Roads Roundabout Cod Spring". The Beacon News. July 1, 1932. p. 11. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  6. ^ "Garrison Items". The Cold Spring Recorder. June 16, 1933. p. 5. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  7. ^ "Ask Construction Of Philipstown Road". The Putnam County Courier. December 22, 1933. p. 1. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  8. ^ "Fish Praises Put Men for Cat Rock Road". The Beacon News. November 6, 1933. p. 1, 7. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  9. ^ "Seeks Survey of Cat Rock Highway". The Peekskill Evening Star. January 29, 1934. p. 2. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  10. ^ "Board of Supervisors Meeting". The Cold Spring Recorder. February 2, 1934. p. 1. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  11. ^ "Cat Rock Road On 1934 Map". The Newburgh News. May 3, 1934. p. 4. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  12. ^ "Give Us Cat Rock Road". The Beacon News. May 16, 1934. p. 1. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  13. ^ "Then Fix Up Cat Rock Road". The Peekskill Evening News. May 16, 1934. p. 2. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  14. ^ "To Advertise Cat Rock Road in Short Timem". The Beacon News. October 15, 1934. p. 1. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  15. ^ "Osborn, Sloan to Give Land for Road". The Beacon News. October 29, 1934. p. 1. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  16. ^ "Cat Rock Road Rights Are Completed". The Beacon News. April 13, 1935. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  17. ^ "Roads from Relief Money". The Putnam County Courier. April 19, 1935. p. 2. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  18. ^ "Cat Rock Road May Be Built This Year". The Putnam County Courier. June 21, 1935. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  19. ^ "Expect U. S. O. K. On Cat Rock Road". The Peekskill Evening Star. August 12, 1935. p. 5. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  20. ^ "Work on Cat Rock Road Will Start Soon Thro Cooperation of Democratic Administrations". The Putnam County Courier. September 27, 1935. p. 1. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  21. ^ Schumacher, Jane S. (November 5, 1935). "Society Notes". The Peekskill Evening Star. p. 2. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  22. ^ "Cat Rock Road Work Progressing". The Beacon News. January 4, 1936. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  23. ^ "Work Resumes on Cat Rock Road". The Peekskill Evening Star. March 18, 1936. p. 5. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  24. ^ "Rapid Progress On Cat Rock Road". The Peekskill Evening Star. June 16, 1936. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  25. ^ "Heavy Grading on Cat Rock Hill Road Project Is Completed". The Beacon News. June 13, 1936. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  26. ^ "Concrete Being Laid by Ottaviano Firm". The Newburgh News. August 22, 1936. p. 2. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  27. ^ "Cat Rock Hill Road Is Expected to Be Open to Traffic Oct. 1". The Beacon News. August 22, 1936. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  28. ^ "Git Rock Rd. Paving Done". The Newburgh News. September 18, 1936. p. 11. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  29. ^ "'Black Top' Intersections of Cat Rock Road". The Beacon News. September 19, 1936. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  30. ^ "Cat Rock Hill Road in Garrison Now Open to Two-Way Traffic". The Beacon News. September 26, 1936. p. 3. Retrieved June 28, 2018 – via Fultonhistory.com.

External linksEdit

Route map:

KML is from Wikidata