Munster Senior Football Championship

The Munster GAA Football Senior Championship, known simply as the Munster Championship, is an annual inter-county Gaelic football competition organised by the Munster Council of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county Gaelic football competition in the province of Munster, and has been contested every year, bar one, since the 1888 championship.

Munster GAA Football Senior Championship
Current season or competition:
2022 Munster Senior Football Championship
IrishCraobh Peile na Mumhan
CodeGaelic football
Founded1888; 134 years ago (1888)
RegionMunster (GAA)
TrophyMunster Cup
No. of teams6
Title holdersColours of Kerry.svg Kerry (82nd title)
Most titlesColours of Kerry.svg Kerry (82 titles)
SponsorsSuperValu, Eir, AIB
TV partner(s)RTÉ
Sky Sports
MottoBe there. All the way.
Official websitemunster.gaa.ie

The final, currently held on the fourth Saturday in June, serves as the culmination of a series of games played during May and June, and the results determine which team receives the Munster Cup. The championship has always been played on a straight knockout basis whereby once a team loses they are eliminated from the championship.

The Munster Championship is an integral part of the wider GAA Football All-Ireland Senior Championship. The winners of the Munster final, like their counterparts in Connacht, Leinster and Ulster, are rewarded by advancing directly to the All-Ireland Super 8s. All other defeated teams advance to the All-Ireland Qualifiers or the second tier Tailteann Cup.

Six teams currently participate in the Munster Championship. The most successful team in Gaelic football, namely Kerry, play their provincial football in the Munster Championship and have won the title on a record 81 occasions while they have also claimed 37 All-Ireland titles.

The title has been won at least once by all six of the Munster counties, four of which have won the title more than once. The championship has been dominated by Kerry, and to a lesser extent Cork, who have won the title every year since 1936, with the exception of victories by Tipperary in 2020 and Clare in 1992. Tipperary are the current champions.[1][2]

Current team detailsEdit

Team Colours Sponsor Manager Captain Most recent success
All-Ireland Provincial
Clare   Saffron and Blue Colm Collins Gary BrennanRET[3]
1992
Cork   Red and white Ronan McCarthy Paul Kerrigan
2010
2012
Kerry   Green and gold Peter Keane Paul Murphy[4]
2014
2019
Limerick   Green and white Billy Lee Donal O'Sullivan
1896
1896
Tipperary   Blue and gold David Power Conor Sweeney
1920
2020
Waterford   White and blue Shane Ronayne Paul Whyte
1898
Team Position
in 2021
League First year in
Championship
Championship
titles
Last
Championship
title
Last Final Appearance
Clare Quarter-finalists Division 2 1888 2 1992 2012
Cork Runners-up Division 2 1888 37 2012 2021
Kerry Champions Division 1 1889 82 2021 2021
Limerick Semi-finalists Division 3 1888 1 1896 2010
Tipperary Semi-finalists Division 4 1888 10 2020 2020
Waterford Quarter-finalists Division 4 1888 1 1898 1960

HistoryEdit

DevelopmentEdit

Following the foundation of the Gaelic Athletic Association in 1884, new rules for Gaelic football and hurling were drawn up and published in the United Irishman newspaper. In 1886, county committees began to be established, with several counties affiliating over the next few years. The GAA ran its inaugural All-Ireland Senior Football Championship in 1887. The decision to establish that first championship was influenced by several factors. Firstly, inter-club contests in 1885 and 1886 were wildly popular and began to draw huge crowds. Clubs started to travel across the country to play against each other and these matches generated intense interest as the newspapers began to speculate which teams might be considered the best in the country. Secondly, although the number of clubs was growing, many were slow to affiliate to the Association, leaving it short of money. Establishing a central championship held the prospect of enticing GAA clubs to process their affiliations, just as the establishment of the FA Cup had done much in the 1870s to promote the development of the Football Association in England. The championships were open to all affiliated clubs who would first compete in county-based competitions, to be run by local county committees. The winners of each county championship would then proceed to represent that county in the All-Ireland series.[5] For the first and only time in its history the All-Ireland Championship used an open draw format. Six teams entered the first championship, however, this number increased to nine in 1888. Because of this, and in an effort to reduce travelling costs, the GAA decided to introduce provincial championships.

BeginningsEdit

The inaugural Munster Championship featured Clare, Cork, Limerick, Tipperary and Waterford. Cork and Tipperary contested the very first match on Sunday 27 May 1888, as part of a hurling-football double-header between the counties at Buttevant. Clare defeated Limerick in the first semi-final, however, Limerick were later awarded the game as Clare champions Newmarket-on-Fergus used players from other clubs to supplement their team. Such a format was not yet allowed. The inaugural Munster final between Tipperary and Limerick was to be played on Saturday 10 November 1888, however, no game was played as Tipperary received a walkover from Limerick.

Postponements, disqualifications, objections, withdrawals and walkovers were regular occurrences during the initial years of the championship. Kerry became the sixth and final team to enter the championship in 1889. On Sunday 6 October 1889, the very first Munster final took place. Tipperary won their first title on the field of play after a 1–02 to 0–03 defeat of Cork. Since then the championship title has been awarded every year, except in 1921 when the championship was cancelled due to the ongoing Civil War.

Team dominanceEdit

The first 15 years of the Munster Championship saw the most equitable era in its history with five of the six participating teams claiming the title. Cork led the way by claiming seven titles, closely followed by five for Tipperary, who also became the first team to retain the title. Limerick, Waterford and Kerry all claimed one title apiece during this era. In winning the 1903 Munster final, Kerry claimed the first of a new record of three successive titles and set in train a level of championship dominance that continues to the present day. This record was bested in each of the following decades with Kerry winning four-a-in-a-row between 1912 and 1915, five-in-a-row between 1923 and 1927, six-in-a-row between 1929 and 1934, seven-in-a-row between 1936 and 1942 and eight-in-a-row between 1958 and 1965. The dominance continued with Kerry claiming 20 of the 25 available Munster Championship titles between 1958 and 1982. Since the turn of the 20th century, Cork had claimed titles in almost every decade, including several back-to-back successes, but had never enjoyed a prolonged period of dominance. Cork won the 1987 Munster final, bringing an end to a run of success by a Kerry team that has since come to be regarded as the greatest of all time and securing the first of seven Munster Championship titles over the following nine seasons.[6] For the first time in 100 years, Cork ended the nineties as the "team of the decade" after winning five Munster Championship titles in total. The first two decades of the 21st century has seen Kerry win 15 of a possible 20 Munster Championship titles.

FormatEdit

The Munster Championship has always been a knockout tournament whereby once a team is defeated they are eliminated from the championship. In the early years the pairings were drawn at random and there was no seeding. Each match was played as a single leg. If a match ended in a draw there was a replay. Drawn replays were settled with extra time; however, if both sides were still level at the end of extra time a second replay took place and so on until a winner was found. Extra-time was eventually adopted in the event of a draw for all championship games except the final.

The dominance of Kerry and, to a lesser extent, Cork led to both these teams being seeded on opposite sides of the championship draw. This was later viewed as a mean of penalising the other "weaker" teams. While it might be possible to beat one of these teams it was deemed near impossible to beat the two strongest teams in the province in a single championship season. This practice was eventually abolished with a return to the open draw in advance of the 1992 championship, which eventually saw Clare become the first "non-traditional" champions since 1935.

The Munster Council abandoned the open draw and returned to a system of seeding both Cork and Kerry on opposite sides before the 2008 championship.[7] After an outcry, the open draw was reinstated in 2009 after just one season of seeding.[8] The policy of seeding Cork and Kerry returned once again in 2013, however, it was abandoned after just one season and the open draw has remained in place ever since.[9][10]

The Munster Championship has always been an integral part of the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship. Between 1888 and 2000 the Munster final winners automatically qualified for the All-Ireland semi-final. The introduction of the All-Ireland Qualifiers system in 2001 allowed the five defeated teams a second chance of qualifying the All-Ireland Championship, while the Munster champions received a bye to the All-Ireland quarter-final.

  • Until 1952 usually an open draw
  • 1953–1964 Limerick didn't take part expect in 1955 Limerick were apporoved to host Waterford but withdraw.
  • 1954 Clare skipped a year.
  • 1965 Cork and Kerry byes to semi-finals.
  • 1966 Kerry and Limerick byes to semi-finals.
  • 1967–1979 Seeded draw meaning Cork and Kerry only allowed to meet in the final.
  • 1980 Two First round games, One Quarter-final, one Semi-final and Kerry bye to the final.
  • 1981–1990 Seeded draw meaning Cork and Kerry only allowed to meet in the final.
  • 1991–1996 Open draw straight forward.
  • 1997–1998 One First round game, One Quarter-final and two Semi-finals.
  • 1999–2007 Open draw straight forward.
  • 2008 Seeded draw meaning Cork and Kerry only allowed to meet in the final.
  • 2009–2013 Open draw straight forward.
  • 2014 Seeded draw meaning Cork and Kerry only allowed to meet in the final.
  • 2015–2020 Open draw but two teams reach final are byes to semi-final.[clarification needed]
  • 2021-onwards back to straight forward open draw system.

Current formatEdit

OverviewEdit

The Munster Championship is a single elimination tournament. Each team is afforded only one defeat before being eliminated from the championship. Pairings for matches are drawn at random and there is currently no seeding. Each match is played as a single leg. If a match is drawn there is a period of extra time, however, if both sides are still level at the end of extra time a replay takes place and so on until a winner is found.

ProgressionEdit

Teams entering in this round Teams advancing from previous round
Quarter-finals
(4 teams)
  • 4 teams drawn at random
Semi-finals
(4 teams)
  • 2 teams who receive a bye at random
  • 2 winners from the quarter-finals
Final
(2 teams)
  • 2 winners from the semi-finals

Qualification for subsequent competitionsEdit

As of the 2020 championship, qualification for the All-Ireland Championship will change due to the creation of a tier 2 championship known as the Tailteann Cup. The Munster champions will continue to automatically qualify for the All-Ireland Super 8s. National League Division 3 and 4 teams who fail to reach the Munster final will automatically qualify for the Tailteann Cup. All other teams from Division 1 and 2 will progress to the All-Ireland Qualifiers.[11] The straightforward open draw will reverted for 2021 season due to Tipperary winning.

VenuesEdit

 
FitzGerald Stadium is the home venue of Kerry and is one of the most popular Munster final venues
 
As well as being the home venue of Cork, the newly rebuilt Páirc Uí Chaoimh hosted the 2018 and 2019 finals

HistoryEdit

Munster Championship matches were traditionally played at neutral venues or at a location that was deemed to be halfway between the two participants; however, all of the teams eventually came to home and away agreements. Every second meeting between these teams is played at the home venue of one of them.

While the six county grounds have regularly been used for championship matches in recent times, smaller club grounds have historically been used for games which may not have had such a high-profile. These grounds include: Ned Hall Park in Clonmel, FitzGerald Park in Kilmallock, Páirc na nGael in Askeaton, Páirc Mac Gearailt in Fermoy, Hennessy Memorial Park in Milltown Malbay and Frank Sheehy Park in Listowel.

AttendancesEdit

Stadium attendances are a significant source of regular income for the Munster Council and for the teams involved. For the 2019 championship, average attendances were 6,146 with a total aggregate attendance figure of 30,731. Excluding the final, these figures revealed a drop of 49% recorded from those through the turnstiles the previous year.[12][13]

ManagersEdit

 
Mick O'Dwyer (right) won more titles that any other manager
 
Billy Morgan managed Cork to 8 titles across three separate decades

Managers in the Munster Championship are involved in the day-to-day running of the team, including the training, team selection, and sourcing of players from the club championships. Their influence varies from county-to-county and is related to the individual county boards. From 2018, all inter-county head coaches must be Award 2 qualified. The manager is assisted by a team of two or three selectors and an extensive backroom team consisting of various coaches. Prior to the development of the concept of a manager in the 1970s, teams were usually managed by a team of selectors with one member acting as chairman.

Winning managers (1968–present)
Manager Team Wins Winning years
  Mick O'Dwyer Kerry 11 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986
  Billy Morgan Cork 8 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2006
  Páidí Ó Sé Kerry 6 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003
  Éamonn Fitzmaurice Kerry 6 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
  Jack O'Connor Kerry 4 2004, 2005, 2010, 2011
  Jackie Lyne Kerry 3 1968, 1969, 1970
  Donie O'Donovan Cork 3 1971, 1973, 1974
  Conor Counihan Cork 3 2008, 2009, 2012
  Larry Tompkins Cork 2 1999, 2002
  Johnny Culloty Kerry 1 1972
  Éamonn Ryan Cork 1 1983
  Mickey Ned O'Sullivan Kerry 1 1991
  John Maughan Clare 1 1992
  Pat O'Shea Kerry 1 2007
  Peter Keane Kerry 1 2019
  David Power Tipperary 1 2020
Current managers
Nat. Name Team(s) Appointed Time as manager
  Colm Collins Clare 23 October 2013 8 years, 215 days
  Billy Lee Limerick 29 November 2016 5 years, 178 days
  Ronan McCarthy Cork 24 August 2017 4 years, 275 days
  Peter Keane Kerry 4 October 2018 3 years, 234 days
  David Power Tipperary 24 September 2019 2 years, 244 days
  Shane Ronayne Waterford 11 January 2021[14] 1 year, 135 days

Trophy and medalsEdit

 
View from the Blackrock End terrace of the old Páirc Uí Chaoimh during the 2014 Munster final between Cork and Kerry

At the end of the Munster final, the winning team is presented with a trophy. The Munster Cup is held by the winning team until the following year's final. Traditionally, the presentation is made at a special rostrum in the stand where GAA and political dignitaries and special guests view the match.

The cup is decorated with ribbons in the colours of the winning team. During the game the cup actually has both teams' sets of ribbons attached and the runners-up ribbons are removed before the presentation. The winning captain accepts the cup on behalf of his team before giving a short speech. Individual members of the winning team then have an opportunity to come to the rostrum to lift the cup.

The present Munster Cup was first used in 1928, when it was donated by the Munster Council. In 2013, there was a debate around naming the cup in honour of a former player or administrator, however, this was rejected.[15] In March 2021, the Munster Council deferred a decision to name the trophy, with Michael Hogan and Páidí Ó Sé the two names proposed.[16]

In accordance with GAA rules, the Munster Council awards up to 26 gold medals to the winners of the Munster final.

SponsorshipEdit

Since 1994, the Munster Championship has been sponsored. The sponsor has usually been able to determine the championship's sponsorship name.

Period Sponsor(s) Name
1888–1993 No main sponsor The Munster Championship
1994–2007   Bank of Ireland The Bank of Ireland Munster Championship
2008–2009   Toyota, Ulster Bank,   Vodafone The Munster GAA Football Championship
2010   SuperValu, Ulster Bank,   Vodafone The Munster GAA Football Championship
2011–2013   SuperValu, Ulster Bank,   Eircom The Munster GAA Football Championship
2014   SuperValu,   GAAGO,   Eircom The Munster GAA Football Championship
2015   SuperValu,   AIB,   Eircom The Munster GAA Football Championship
2016–   SuperValu,   AIB,   Eir The Munster GAA Football Championship

List of winners by countyEdit

Team Wins Years won Runners-up Years runners-up
1 Kerry 82 1892, 1903, 1904, 1905, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1919, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1991, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021 24 1890, 1893, 1900, 1902, 1906, 1918, 1920, 1945, 1952, 1956, 1966, 1967, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992, 1999, 2006, 2008
2 Cork 37 1890, 1891, 1893, 1894, 1897, 1899, 1901, 1906, 1907, 1911, 1916, 1928, 1943, 1945, 1949, 1952, 1956, 1957, 1966, 1967, 1971, 1973, 1974, 1983, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2002, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2012 55 1889, 1892, 1898, 1903, 1909, 1910, 1913, 1914, 1917, 1935, 1938, 1942, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1953,1954, 1955, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1996, 2000, 201, 2005, 2007, 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021
3 Tipperary 10 1888, 1889, 1895, 1900, 1902, 1918, 1920, 1922, 1935, 2020 18 1894, 1899, 1907, 1923, 1926, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1939, 1943, 1944, 1993, 1994, 1998, 2002, 2016
4 Clare 2 1917, 1992 12 1912, 1915, 1916, 1919, 1925, 1929, 1936, 1937, 1941, 1949, 1997, 2012
5 Limerick 1 1896 12 1888, 1895, 1901, 1905, 1922, 1934, 1965, 1991, 2003, 2004, 2009, 2010
Waterford 1 1898 9 1891, 1896, 1904, 1908, 1911, 1940, 1946, 1957, 1960

List of Munster finalsEdit

 
Austin Stack captained Kerry in 1904
 
Billy Morgan captained Cork in 1973
 
Denis "Ógie" Moran captained Kerry in 1978
 
Dinny Allen captained Cork in 1989
 
Dara Ó Cinnéide captained Kerry in 2004
 
Declan O'Sullivan captained Kerry in 2005 and 2007
 
Graham Canty captained Cork in 2008 and 2009
All-Ireland champions
All-Ireland runners-up
Year Winners Score Runners-up Score Captain(s) Venue Attendance
1888 Tipperary w/o Limerick scr. Gil Kavanagh
1889 Tipperary 0–03 Cork 0–02 Gil Kavanagh Mallow Town Park
1890 Cork 1–04 Kerry 0–01 Jim Power Banteer Sportsfield
1891 Cork 1–05 Waterford 0–04 Con O'Leary Youghal Sportsfield
1892 Kerry 1–06 Cork 1–03 JP O'Sullivan Páirc Mac Gearailt
1893 Cork 2–03 Kerry 1–04 Jack O'Keeffe Mallow Town Park
1894 Cork 1–07 Tipperary 1–03 John O'Leary Charleville Sportsfield
1895 Tipperary 0–05 Limerick 0–03 Paddy Finn Kilmallock Sportsfield
1896 Limerick 0–04 Waterford 0–01 Con Fitzgerald Mallow Town Park
1897 Cork 0–05 Limerick 0–03 Danny O'Donovan Tipperary Sportsfield
1898 Waterford 1–03 Cork 0–04 James Wall Castle Grounds
1899 Cork 1–09 Tipperary 0–01 Dan Coughlan Markets Field
1900 Tipperary 2–04 Kerry 2–01 Jack Tobin Markets Field
1901 Cork 1–09 Limerick 1–06 Jim Murphy Tipperary Sportsfield
1902 Tipperary 2–04 Kerry 0–03 Bob Quane Turners Cross
1903 Kerry 0–05 Cork 0–03 Thady O'Gorman Markets Field
1904 Kerry 2–03 Waterford 0–02 Austin Stack Fraher Field
1905 Kerry 2–10 Limerick 1–06 Maurice McCarthy Tralee Sportsfield
1906 Cork 1–10 Kerry 0–03 Martin O'Connor Tipperary Sportsfield
1907 Cork 1–07 Tipperary 0–01 Billy Mackesy Fraher Field
1908 Kerry 0–07 Waterford 0–02 Con Healy Cork Athletic Grounds
1909 Kerry 2–08 Cork 1–07 Tom Costello Cork Athletic Grounds
1910 Kerry 0–04 Cork 0–02 Tom Costello Cork Athletic Grounds
1911 Cork 2–05 Waterford 0–01 Mick Mehigan Fraher Field
1912 Kerry 0–03 Clare 0–01 Dick Fitzgerald Cusack Park
1913 Kerry 1–06 Cork 0–01 Dick Fitzgerald Cork Athletic Grounds
1914 Kerry 0–05 Cork 0–01 Dick Fitzgerald Tralee Sportsfield
1915 Kerry 4–03 Clare 0–01 Dick Fitzgerald Tipperary Sportsfield
1916 Cork 2–02 Clare 1–04 Paddy O'Connell Clonmel Sportsfield
1917 Clare 5–04 Cork 0–01 Tipperary Sportsfield
1918 Tipperary 1–01 Kerry 0–01 Ned O'Shea Cork Athletic Grounds
1919 Kerry 6–11 Clare 2–00 Con Clifford Cusack Park
1920 Tipperary 2–02 Kerry 0–02 Ned O'Shea Cork Athletic Grounds
1921 No championship
1922 Tipperary 1–07 Limerick 0–01 Ned O'Shea Thurles Sportsfield
1923 Kerry 0–05 Tipperary 0–03 John O'Mahony Tralee Sportsfield
1924 Kerry 5–08 Clare 2v02 Phil O'Sullivan Markets Field
1925 Kerry 5–05 Clare 0–00 Tom O'Mahony Killarney Sportsfield
1926 Kerry 0–11 Tipperary 1–04 John Joe Sheehy Cork Athletic Grounds
1927 Kerry 4–04 Clare 1–03 Joe Barrett The Cricket Field
1928 Cork 4–03 Tipperary 0–04 Fraher Field
1929 Kerry 1–14 Clare 1–02 Joe Barrett Killarney Sportsfield
1930 Kerry 3–04 Tipperary 1–02 John Joe Sheehy Tipperary Sportsfield
1931 Kerry 5–08 Tipperary 0–02 Con Brosnan Tralee Sportsfield
1932 Kerry 3–10 Tipperary 1–04 Miko Doyle Carrick Sportsfield
1933 Kerry 2–08 Tipperary 1–04 Miko Doyle Clonmel Sportsfield
1934 Kerry 1–14 Limerick 1–02 Dan O'Keeffe Listowel Sportsfield
1935 Tipperary 2–08 Cork 1–02 Dick Power Páirc Mac Gearailt
1936 Kerry 1–11 Clare 2–02 Dan O'Keeffe Gaelic Grounds
1937 Kerry 4–09 Clare 1–01 Miko Doyle Gaelic Grounds
1938 Kerry 4–14 Cork 1–06 Bill Kinnerk Clonakilty Sportsfield
1939 Kerry 2–11 Tipperary 0–04 Tom O'Connor Clonmel Sportsfield
1940 Kerry 1–10 Waterford 0–06 Dan Spring Waterford Sportsfield
1941 Kerry 2–09 Clare 0–06 Bill Dillon Gaelic Grounds
1942 Kerry 3–07 Cork 0–08 Tom O'Connor Tralee Sportsfield
1943 Cork 1–07 Tipperary 1–04 Tadhgo Crowley Páirc Mac Gearailt
1944 Kerry 1–06 Tipperary 0–05 Paddy Bawn Brosnan Gaelic Grounds
1945 Cork 1–11 Kerry 1–06 Tadhg Crowley FitzGerald Stadium
1946 Kerry 2–16 Waterford 2–01 Eddie Dowling Austin Stack Park
1947 Kerry 3–08 Cork 2–06 Jackie Lyne Cork Athletic Grounds
1948 Kerry 2–09 Cork 2–06 Joe Keohane FitzGerald Stadium
1949 Cork 3–06 Clare 0–07 John O'Keeffe Gaelic Grounds
1950 Kerry 2–05 Cork 1–05 Jackie Lyne Cork Athletic Grounds
1951 Kerry 1-06 Cork 0–04 John Joe Sheehan FitzGerald Stadium
1952 Cork 0–11 Kerry 0–02 Éamonn Young Cork Athletic Grounds
1953 Kerry 2–07 Cork 2–03 Paudie Sheehy FitzGerald Stadium
1954 Kerry 4–09 Cork 2–03 John Dowling Cork Athletic Grounds
1955 Kerry 0–14 Cork 2–06 John Dowling FitzGerald Stadium
1956 Cork 1–08 Kerry 1–07 Donal O'Sullivan FitzGerald Stadium
1957 Cork 0–16 Waterford 1–02 Nealie Duggan Thurles Sportsfield
1958 Kerry 2–07 Cork 0–03 Mick Murphy Cork Athletic Grounds
1959 Kerry 2–15 Cork 2–08 Mick O'Connell FitzGerald Stadium
1960 Kerry 3–15 Waterford 0–08 Paudie Sheehy Cork Athletic Grounds
1961 Kerry 2–13 Cork 1–04 Niall Sheehy FitzGerald Stadium
1962 Kerry 4–08 Cork 0–04 Seán Óg Sheehy Cork Athletic Grounds
1963 Kerry 1–18 Cork 3–07 Niall Sheehy FitzGerald Stadium
1964 Kerry 2–11 Cork 1–08 Niall Sheehy Cork Athletic Grounds
1965 Kerry 2–16 Limerick 2–07 Jer D. O'Connor Gaelic Grounds
1966 Cork 2–07 Kerry 1–07 Jerry O'Sullivan FitzGerald Stadium
1967 Cork 0–08 Kerry 0–07 Denis Coughlan Cork Athletic Grounds
1968 Kerry 1–21 Cork 3–08 Pat Griffin FitzGerald Stadium
1969 Kerry 0–16 Cork 1–04 Johnny Culloty Cork Athletic Grounds
1970 Kerry 2–22 Cork 2–09 Donie O'Sullivan FitzGerald Stadium
1971 Cork 0–25 Kerry 0–14 Mick Scannell Cork Athletic Grounds
1972 Kerry 2–21 Cork 2–15 Tom Prendergast FitzGerald Stadium
1973 Cork 5–12 Kerry 1–15 Billy Morgan Cork Athletic Grounds
1974 Cork 1–11 Kerry 0–07 Denis Coughlan FitzGerald Stadium
1975 Kerry 1–14 Cork 0–07 Mickey Ned O'Sullivan FitzGerald Stadium
1976
(R)
Kerry 0–10
3–20
Cork 0–10
2–19
John O'Keeffe Páirc Uí Chaoimh 40,600[17]
1977 Kerry 3–15 Cork 0–09 Ger O'Keeffe FitzGerald Stadium
1978 Kerry 3–14 Cork 3–07 Denis Moran Páirc Uí Chaoimh
1979 Kerry 2–14 Cork 2–09 Tim Kennelly FitzGerald Stadium
1980 Kerry 3–13 Cork 0–12 Ger Power Páirc Uí Chaoimh
1981 Kerry 1–11 Cork 0–03 Jimmy Deenihan FitzGerald Stadium
1982 Kerry 2–18 Cork 0–12 John Egan FitzGerald Stadium
1983 Cork 3–10 Kerry 3–09 Christy Ryan Páirc Uí Chaoimh 17,000[17]
1984 Kerry 3–14 Cork 2–10 Ambrose O'Donovan FitzGerald Stadium
1985 Kerry 2–11 Cork 0–11 Páidí Ó Sé Páirc Uí Chaoimh
1986 Kerry 0–12 Cork 0–08 Tommy Doyle FitzGerald Stadium
1987 Cork 0–13 Kerry 1–05 Conor Counihan FitzGerald Stadium
1988 Cork 1–14 Kerry 0–16 Tony Nation Páirc Uí Chaoimh
1989 Cork 1–12 Kerry 1–09 Dinny Allen FitzGerald Stadium
1990 Cork 2–23 Kerry 1–11 Larry Tompkins Páirc Uí Chaoimh
1991 Kerry 0–23 Limerick 3–12 Jack O'Shea FitzGerald Stadium
1992 Clare 2–10 Kerry 0–12 Francis McInerney Gaelic Grounds
1993 Cork 1–16 Tipperary 1–08 Mick McCarthy Semple Stadium
1994 Cork 2–19 Tipperary 3–09 Steven O'Brien Páirc Uí Chaoimh
1995 Cork 0–15 Kerry 1–09 Niall Cahalane FitzGerald Stadium
1996 Kerry 0–14 Cork 0–11 Billy O'Shea Páirc Uí Chaoimh
1997 Kerry 1–13 Clare 0–11 Mike Hassett Gaelic Grounds [18]
1998 Kerry 0–17 Tipperary 1–10 Séamus Moynihan Semple Stadium 27,263[19]
1999 Cork 2–10 Kerry 2–04 Philip Clifford Páirc Uí Chaoimh 42,755[17]
2000 Kerry 3–15 Clare 0–08 Séamus Moynihan Gaelic Grounds 23,176[20]
2001 Kerry 0–19 Cork 1–13 Séamus Moynihan Páirc Uí Chaoimh 41,158[21]
2002 Cork 2–11
1–23
Tipperary 1–14
0–07
Colin Corkery Semple Stadium
Páirc Uí Chaoimh
33,254[22]
17,708[23]
2003 Kerry 1–11 Limerick 0–09 Mike McCarthy FitzGerald Stadium
2004
(R)
Kerry 1–10
3–10
Limerick 1–10
2–09
Dara Ó Cinnéide Gaelic Grounds
FitzGerald Stadium
23,214[24]
29,379[25]
2005 Kerry 1–11 Cork 0–11 Declan O'Sullivan Páirc Uí Chaoimh 32,000[26]
2006
(R)
Cork 0–10
1–12
Kerry 0–10
0–09
Derek Kavanagh FitzGerald Stadium
Páirc Uí Chaoimh
26,220[27]
23,693[28]
2007 Kerry 1–15 Cork 1–13 Declan O'Sullivan FitzGerald Stadium 31,420[29]
2008 Cork 1–16 Kerry 1–11 Graham Canty Páirc Uí Chaoimh 22,784[30]
2009 Cork 2–06 Limerick 0–11 Graham Canty Páirc Uí Chaoimh 20,676[31]
2010 Kerry 1–17 Limerick 1–14 Bryan Sheehan FitzGerald Stadium 23,864[32]
2011 Kerry 1–15 Cork 1–12 Colm Cooper FitzGerald Stadium 40,892[33]
2012 Cork 3–16 Clare 0–13 Graham Canty Gaelic Grounds 9,139[34]
2013 Kerry 1–16 Cork 0–17 Colm Cooper FitzGerald Stadium 36,370[35]
2014 Kerry 0–24 Cork 0–12 Fionn Fitzgerald
Kieran O'Leary
Páirc Uí Chaoimh 21,028[36]
2015
(R)
Kerry 2–15
1–11
Cork 3–12
1–06
Kieran Donaghy FitzGerald Stadium 35,651[37]
32,233[38]
2016 Kerry 3–17 Tipperary 2–10 Bryan Sheehan FitzGerald Stadium 21,512[39]
2017 Kerry 1–23 Cork 0–15 Fionn Fitzgerald
Johnny Buckley
FitzGerald Stadium 31,836[40]
2018 Kerry 3–18 Cork 2–04 Shane Murphy Páirc Uí Chaoimh 27,764[41]
2019 Kerry 1–19 Cork 3–10 Gavin White Páirc Uí Chaoimh 18,265[42]
2020 Tipperary 0–17 Cork 0–14 Conor Sweeney Páirc Uí Chaoimh 0*[43]
2021 Kerry 4–22 Cork 1–09 Paul Murphy Fitzgerald Stadium 2,500*[44]
 *Denotes match in which COVID-19 restrictions limited attendance

Notes:

  • 1902 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 1-04, Tipperary 1-04
  • 1904 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 0-03, Waterford 0-03
  • 1956 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 2-02, Cork 0-08
  • 1961 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 0–10, Cork 1-07
  • 1976 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 0–10, Cork 0–10
  • 1982 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 0-09, Cork 0-09
  • 1987 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 2-07, Cork 1–10
  • 2002 – The first match ended in a draw: Cork 2–11, Tipperary 1–14
  • 2004 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 1–11, Cork 1–11
  • 2006 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 0–10, Cork 0–10
  • 2015 – The first match ended in a draw: Kerry 2–15, Cork 3–12
  • 2020 – Match played with no spectators due to COVID-19 pandemic

StatisticsEdit

Most recent championship meetingsEdit

Clare Cork Kerry Limerick Tipperary Waterford
Clare - 2015 2021 2022 2020 2019
Cork - - 2022 2021 2020 2017
Kerry - - - 2022 2021 2013
Limerick - - - - 2022 2021
Tipperary - - - - - 2022
Waterford - - - - - -

Teams by decadeEdit

The most successful team of each decade, judged by number of Munster Senior Football Championship titles, is as follows:

  • 1880s: 2 for Tipperary (1888–89)
  • 1890s: 6 for Cork (1890-91-93-94-97-99)
  • 1900s: 5 for Kerry (1903-04-05-08-09)
  • 1910s: 6 for Kerry (1910-12-13-14-15-19)
  • 1920s: 6 for Kerry (1923-24-25-26-27-29)
  • 1930s: 9 for Kerry (1930-31-32-33-34-36-37-38-39)
  • 1940s: 7 for Kerry (1940-41-42-44-46-47-48)
  • 1950s: 7 for Kerry (1950-51-53-54-55-58-59)
  • 1960s: 8 for Kerry (1960-61-62-63-64-65-68-69)
  • 1970s: 7 for Kerry (1970-72-75-76-77-78-79)
  • 1980s: 6 for Kerry (1980-81-82-84-85-86)
  • 1990s: 5 for Cork (1990-93-94-95-99)
  • 2000s: 6 for Kerry (2000-01-03-04-05-07)
  • 2010s: 9 for Kerry (2010-11-13-14-15-16-17-18-19)

Other recordsEdit

GapsEdit

Longest gaps between successive Munster titles:

  • 85 years: Tipperary (1935–2020)
  • 75 years: Clare (1917–1992)
  • 16 years: Tipperary (1902–1918)
  • 15 years: Cork (1928–1943)
  • 13 years: Tipperary (1922–1935)
  • 12 years: Cork (1916–1928)
  • 11 years: Kerry (1892–1903)

Longest undefeated runEdit

The record for the longest unbeaten run stands at 18 games held by Kerry. They achieved this feat on three separate occasions: 1936–1943, 1958–1966 and 1975–1983.

PlayersEdit

Top scorersEdit

All timeEdit

Rank Player Team Score Tally Era
1 Maurice Fitzgerald Kerry 9–167 194 1988–2001
2 Mikey Sheehy Kerry 15–119 164 1974–1987
3 Colin Corkery Cork 4–132 144 1993–2004
4 Colm Cooper Kerry 8–110 134 2002–2016
5 Declan Browne Tipperary 5–106 121 1996–2007
6 Pat Spillane Kerry 14–77 119 1975–1991
7 Bryan Sheehan Kerry 5–97 112 2005–2017
8 Peter Lambert Tipperary 11–68 101 1988–2003
9 Dara Ó Cinnéide Kerry 8–71 95 1994–2005
10 Mick O'Dwyer Kerry 4–79 91 1957–1973
Dinny Allen Cork 11–58 91 1972–1989

By yearEdit

Year Name Team Score Total
1965 Éamonn Cregan Limerick 2-08 14
1966 Gene McCarthy Cork 3-06 15
1967 Mick Tynan Limerick 3–12 21
1968 Mick O'Dwyer Kerry 0–12 12
1969 Vinny Kirwan Waterford 0–12 12
John Cummins Tipperary 0–12 12
1970 Denis Coughlan Cork 3–14 23
1971 Denis Coughlan Cork 1–16 19
1972 Mick O'Dwyer Kerry 0–13 13
1973 Billy Field Cork 2–14 20
1974 Ray Cummins Cork 1-08 11
1975 Jim Kehoe Tipperary 4-00 12
1976 Mikey Sheehy Kerry 1–20 23
1977 Barry Walsh Kerry 2-09 15
1978 Mikey Sheehy Kerry 4–13 25
1979 Ger Power Kerry 4-06 18
1980 Anthony Moran Limerick 0–21 21
1981 Mikey Sheehy Kerry 1–11 14
1982 Mikey Sheehy Kerry 2–15 21
1983 Mikey Sheehy Kerry 2–11 17
John Cleary Cork 1–14 17
1984 Franny Kelly Tipperary 1-09 12
1985 Franny Kelly Tipperary 1–19 22
1986 Franny Kelly Tipperary 1–11 14
1987 Larry Tompkins Kerry 0–15 15
1988 Maurice Fitzgerald Kerry 0–16 16
1989 Eoin Sheehan Limerick 4-07 19
1990 Maurice Fitzgerald Kerry 1–14 17
1991 Maurice Fitzgerald Kerry 0–24 24
1992 Maurice Fitzgerald Kerry 1–20 23
1993 Colin Corkery Cork 2–20 26
1994 Peter Lambert Tipperary 4–13 25
1996 Maurice Fitzgerald Kerry 4–20 32
1996 Dara Ó Cinnéide Kerry 1–15 18
1997 Brendan Cummins Tipperary 1–13 16
1998 Declan Browne Tipperary 2–29 35
1099 Podsie O'Mahony Cork 1–13 16
2000 Dara Ó Cinnéide Kerry 2-09 15
2001 Dara Ó Cinnéide Kerry 1–13 16
2002 Colin Corkery Cork 0–29 29
2003 Declan Browne Tipperary 1–16 19
2004 Muiris Gavin Limerick 0–24 24
2005 Colm Cooper Cork 3–12 21
2006 James Masters Cork 1–21 24
2007 James Masters Cork 3–18 27
2008 Daniel Goulding Cork 1-08 11
2009 Donncha O'Connor Cork 3–14 23
2010 Colm Cooper Kerry 1–20 23
2011 Daniel Goulding Cork 2–15 21
2012 Ian Ryan Limerick 1–17 20
2013 Daniel Goulding Cork 1–17 20
2014 Paul Whyte Waterford 1-07 10
David Tubridy Clare 1-07 10
Shane McGrath Clare 1-07 10
James O'Donoghue Kerry 0–10 10
2015 Colm O'Neill Cork 1–14 17
2016 Kevin O'Halloran Tipperary 0–15 15
2017 James O'Donoghue Kerry 0–16 16
2018 Paul Geaney Kerry 2–12 18
2019 Mark Collins Cork 0–17 17
2020 Conor Sweeney Tipperary 1–18 21

Most appearancesEdit

Rank Player Team Games Era
1 Colm Cooper Kerry 41 2002–2016
Tomás Ó Sé Kerry 41 1997–2013
3 Darragh Ó Sé Kerry 40 1994–2009
4 Marc Ó Sé Kerry 38 2002–2016
5 Dan O'Keeffe Kerry 36 1932–1948
6 Tom O'Sullivan Kerry 34 2000–2011
Séamus Moynihan Kerry 34 1992–2006
Jack O'Shea Kerry 34 1977–1992
Mick O'Connell Kerry 34 1956–1974
10 Maurice Fitzgerald Kerry 33 1988–2001
Billy Morgan Cork 33 1966–1981

Record Munster medal winnersEdit

Rank Player Team No. Years
1 Dan O'Keeffe Kerry 14 1932, 1933, 1934, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1948
2 Mick O'Connell Kerry 12 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972
3 Pat Spillane Kerry 12 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1991
4 Mick O'Dwyer Kerry 11 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972
5 John O'Keeffe Kerry 11 1970, 1972, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984
6 Páidí Ó Sé Kerry 11 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986
7 Ger Power Kerry 11 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986
8 Mikey Sheehy Kerry 11 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986
9 Denis "Ógie" Moran Kerry 11 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986
10 Dick Fitzgerald Kerry 10 1903, 1905, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1912, 1913, 1914, 1915, 1923
11 Miko Doyle Kerry 10 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939
12 Joe Keohane Kerry 10 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1944, 1947, 1948
13 Johnny Culloty Kerry 10 1955, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1969, 1970
14 Jack O'Shea Kerry 10 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1991

Team progress since 2001Edit

Below is a record of each county's performance since the introduction of the qualifier system to the All-Ireland series in 2001. Qualifiers did not occur from 2020 onwards due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Gaelic games.

Key
Winner
Final
Semi-final
Quarter-final / Super 8s
Qualifier Rounds 1–4 / Tommy Murphy Cup
Championship 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Clare Q2 Q2 Q2 Q2 Q3 Q2 TM TM Q2 Q1 Q1 Q4 Q2 Q3 Q2 QF Q3 Q3 Q4
Cork Q4 SF Q1 Q3 SF SF F SF F W QF SF QF QF Q4 Q4 Q4 Q4 S8s
Kerry SF F SF W F W W F W QF F QF SF W F SF SF S8s F
Limerick Q2 Q3 Q4 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 Q2 Q4 Q4 QF Q3 Q1 Q3 Q1 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q2
Tipperary Q1 Q4 Q3 Q1 Q1 Q2 TM Q1 Q2 Q2 Q1 Q4 Q1 Q4 Q3 SF Q3 Q2 Q1
Waterford Q1 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q1 Q1 TM TM Q1 Q2 Q3 Q1 Q2 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q1

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ O'Toole, Fintan (22 June 2019). "14-man Kerry survive Cork test to remain Munster football champions". The42.ie. Journal Media. Retrieved 24 June 2020.
  2. ^ Fogarty, John (22 November 2020). "Stars align as heroic Tipperary shock Cork for first Munster SFC title in 85 years". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 24 November 2020.
  3. ^ "Clare's Gary Brennan announces inter-county retirement". RTÉ Sport. 28 January 2021. Retrieved 29 October 2021.
  4. ^ "Paul Murphy to captain Kerry senior footballers in 2021". RTÉ Sport. 25 January 2021. Retrieved 29 October 2021.
  5. ^ Rouse, Paul. "How Leix Won the All-Ireland Hurling Championship of 1915". Century Ireland. Retrieved 9 January 2018 – via RTÉ.ie.
  6. ^ O'Sullivan, Jim (19 September 2011). "Experience, cuteness belief... the Kerry way". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 24 July 2015.
  7. ^ O'Sullivan, Jim (4 October 2007). "'Weak' county fury as Munster reverts to seeded football draw". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 10 January 2018.[dead link]
  8. ^ "An open and shut case". Independent.ie. Mediahuis. 22 May 2011. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  9. ^ Hayes, Seamus (13 September 2013). "Anger as football reverts to seeded draw". The Clare Champion. Retrieved 10 January 2018.
  10. ^ Foley, Cliona (11 September 2014). "Munster's Big Two agree to ditch football seeding". Independent.ie. Mediahuis. Retrieved 24 June 2020.
  11. ^ Fogarty, John (29 February 2020). "New second tier All-Ireland football championship to be called Tailteann Cup". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 24 June 2020.
  12. ^ O'Connor, Colm (19 June 2019). "Munster hurling crowds up 17%, but football slumps 49%". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 24 June 2020.
  13. ^ Fogarty, John (20 June 2019). "Football final crowds set to be lowest in a decade". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 24 June 2020.
  14. ^ Lawlor, Damian (11 January 2021). "Shane Ronayne takes Waterford football reins". RTÉ Sport. Retrieved 29 October 2021.
  15. ^ "Motion to give Munster cups names shot down". Hogan Stand. Lynn Group. 16 May 2013. Retrieved 10 November 2017.
  16. ^ Cormican, Eoghan (19 March 2021). "Munster GAA defer decision on naming Munster Senior Football Championship Cup". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 29 October 2021.
  17. ^ a b c life over as we know it for Munster's big two "Pairc life over as we know it for Munster's big two". Irish Independent. Retrieved 20 February 2022. {{cite web}}: Check |url= value (help)
  18. ^ "Laide leads Kerry past the danger". The Irish Times. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  19. ^ "Kingdom power to glory as Tipp go down fighting". Irish Independent. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  20. ^ "Kerry cruise on in second gear". The Irish Times. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  21. ^ "Kerry edge out Cork in thriller". The Irish Times. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  22. ^ "Unlikely hero Kelly keeps his head to secure replay for Tipp". Irish Independent. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  23. ^ "Corkery leads Cork rout of Tipp". Irish Examiner. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  24. ^ "Limerick effort drops short". The Irish Times. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  25. ^ "Defiant Kerry take time to excel". The Irish Times. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  26. ^ "Kerry come from behind to win". RTE. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  27. ^ "Morgan one of few not surprised". The Irish Times. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  28. ^ "Rebels inflict misery on the Kingdom". RTE. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  29. ^ "Kerry 1-15 Cork 1-13". RTE. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  30. ^ "Cork 1-16 Kerry 1-11". RTE. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  31. ^ "Munster Senior Football Championship Final – Cork Vs. Limerick". Munster GAA. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  32. ^ "Kerry 1-17 Limerick 1-14". RTE. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  33. ^ "First blood to Kingdom". Munster GAA. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  34. ^ "Munster GAA Senior Football Final – Cork 3-16 Clare 0-13". Munster GAA. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  35. ^ "Munster Senior Football Final – Kerry 1-16 Cork 0-17". Munster GAA. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  36. ^ "Munster SFC final: Kerry's O'Donoghue orchestrates Rebels rout". Hogan Stand. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  37. ^ "Munster SFC Final – Kerry 2-15 Cork 3-12". Munster GAA. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  38. ^ "Munster SFC Final Replay – Kerry 1-11 Cork 1-6". Munster GAA. Retrieved 16 February 2022.
  39. ^ "Munster Senior Football Final – Kerry 3-17 Tipperary 2-10". Munster GAA. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  40. ^ "Masterful Kerry brush Cork aside in Munster final". RTE. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  41. ^ "Kerry score their biggest Championship win over Cork since 1938 to land Munster title in style". Irish Independent. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  42. ^ "Munster SFC Final: Kerry battle past Cork". GAA. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  43. ^ "Tipperary end 85-year wait to win Munster crown". RTE. Retrieved 20 February 2022.
  44. ^ "2021 Munster Senior Football Championship Final – Kerry 4-22 Cork 1-9". Munster GAA. Retrieved 20 February 2022.

External linksEdit