Mullach Glas

Mullach Glas (Irish: Mullach Glas, meaning "grey/green peak")[2] at 622 metres (2,041 ft), is the 197th–highest peak in Ireland on the Arderin scale,[3] and the 238th–highest peak on the Vandeleur-Lynam scale.[4][5] Mullach Glas is located on a small massif that includes Binn Mhór (661 metres (2,169 ft)), and Corcogemore (609 metres (1,998 ft));[6] this massif is at the far southeastern sector of the long north-west to south-east cental spine of the Maumturks mountain range in the Connemara National Park in Galway, Ireland.[5] Mullach Glas is the 5th-highest mountain in the Maumturks range.[5][7]

Mullach Glas
Irish: Mullach Glas
Mullach Glas (left) & Binn Mhor (right) from the North.jpg
Mullach Glas (left), and Binn Mhor (centre and right), as viewed from the north
Highest point
Elevation622 m (2,041 ft) [1]
Prominence87 m (285 ft) [1]
ListingHewitt, Arderin, Simm, Vandeleur-Lynam
Coordinates53°28′57″N 9°36′04″W / 53.482522°N 9.601215°W / 53.482522; -9.601215Coordinates: 53°28′57″N 9°36′04″W / 53.482522°N 9.601215°W / 53.482522; -9.601215[1]
Naming
English translationGrey/Green Summit
Language of nameIrish
Geography
Mullach Glas is located in island of Ireland
Mullach Glas
Mullach Glas
Location in Ireland
LocationGalway, Ireland
Parent rangeMaumturks
OSI/OSNI gridL9374849241
Topo mapOSi Discovery 45
Geology
Type of rockPale quartzites, grits, graphitic top bedrock[1]

NamingEdit

Irish academic Paul Tempan records that Irish: Mullach Glas translates as "grey/green summit", and that the peak has also been called "Shannagirah".[2]

GeographyEdit

Mullach Glas lies on a small massif in the southeast sector of the Maumturks range, which is separated from the main range by a deep east-west mountain pass called Máméan, a site of pilgrimage dedicated to Saint Patrick since the 5th-century.[7][8][9]

To the north east is the minor subsidiary peak of Mullach Glas NE Top (432 metres (1,417 ft)), also known as Irish: Cruiscín (probably meaning "jug").[2][6] To the west is Binn Mhór (661 metres (2,169 ft)), the 3rd-highest peak in the Maumturks range, while to the east is Corcogemore (609 metres (1,998 ft))[5][6][7]

Hill walkingEdit

The most straightforward route to the summit Mullach Glas is the 10-kilometre 4–5 hour roundtrip route from the pass at Máméan and back; however, because of its positioning on a high ridge of its own small massif, it can also be climbed as an alternative 10-kilometre 4–5 hour route from Corcogemore in the west, across Mullach Glas, to the summit of Binn Mhór, and then finishing down at Máméan (i.e. the route requires two cars).[6]

Mullach Glas is also climbed as part of the Maamturks Challenge, a 25-kilometre 10–12 hour walk over the full Maumturks range (from Maam Cross to Leenaun), which is considered one of the "great classic ridge-walks of Ireland",[7][10] but of "extreme grade" due to the circa 7,600 feet of total ascent.[6] Since 1975, the University College Galway Mountaineering Club has run the annual "Maamturks Challenge Walk" (MCW),[11] and mans a checkpoint to the west of Mullach Glas in the Máméan pass, and to the east of Mullach Glas on the neighbouring peak of Corcogemore.[12][13]

GalleryEdit

BibliographyEdit

  • MountainViews Online Database (Simon Stewart) (2013). A Guide to Ireland's Mountain Summits: The Vandeleur-Lynams & the Arderins. Collins Books. ISBN 978-1-84889-164-7.
  • Paul Phelan (2011). Connemara & Mayo - A Walking Guide: Mountain, Coastal & Island Walks. Collins Press. ISBN 978-1848891029.
  • Dillion, Paddy (2001). Connemara: Collins Rambler's guide. Harper Collins. ISBN 978-0002201216.
  • Dillion, Paddy (1993). The Mountains of Ireland: A Guide to Walking the Summits. Cicerone. ISBN 978-1852841102.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Mullach Glas". MountainViews Online Database. Retrieved 9 August 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b c Paul Tempan (February 2012). "Irish Hill and Mountain Names" (PDF). MountainViews.ie.
  3. ^ Simon Stewart (October 2018). "Arderins: Irish mountains of 500+m with a prominence of 30m". MountainViews Online Database.
  4. ^ Simon Stewart (October 2018). "Vandeleur-Lynams: Irish mountains of 600+m with a prominence of 15m". MountainViews Online Database.
  5. ^ a b c d Mountainviews, (September 2013), "A Guide to Ireland's Mountain Summits: The Vandeleur-Lynams & the Arderins", Collins Books, Cork, ISBN 978-1-84889-164-7
  6. ^ a b c d e Paul Phelan (2011). Connemara & Mayo - A Walking Guide: Mountain, Coastal & Island Walks. Collins Press. ISBN 978-1848891029. Route 16: Corkóg
  7. ^ a b c d Dillion, Paddy (1993). The Mountains of Ireland: A Guide to Walking the Summits. Cicerone. ISBN 978-1852841102. "Walk 49: Corcogemore, Mullach Glas, Binn Mhór, Binn Chaonaigh, Binn idir an Dá Log, Letterbreckaun, Leenaun Hill
  8. ^ Éanna Ó Caolla (5 August 2016). "Pilgrims head to Connemara hills for annual walk". Retrieved 2 August 2019. The site, which is also associated with the pagan Lughnasa Solstice festivals, features a holy well and a Mass Rock (Carraig an Aifrinn) which was used during the repressive penal times when isolated locations were used to host religious ceremonies. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Máméan Pilgrimage". National Museum of Ireland. High up the slopes of the Maum Turk Mountains in Connemara there is a natural passage-way known as Máméan (pass of the birds). At the summit of this rugged track you will find an ancient pilgrim site dedicated to St. Patrick.
  10. ^ Fairbairn, Helen (2014). Ireland's Best Walks: A Walking Guide. Collins Press. ISBN 978-1848892118. Retrieved 1 August 2019. Route 36: The Central Maumturks – South CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "The Maumturks Challenge". University College Galway Mountaineering Club (UCGMC). Retrieved 1 August 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ Simon Stewart. "Maumturks Challenge Section 1: Corcog to Mamean". MountainViews Online Database. Retrieved 2 August 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "Maaumturks Challenge: The Route". University College Galway Mountaineering Club (UCGMC). Retrieved 2 August 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External linksEdit