Mourmelon-le-Grand

Mourmelon-le-Grand is a commune in the Marne department in north-eastern France.

Mourmelon-le-Grand
The town hall in Mourmelon-le-Grand
The town hall in Mourmelon-le-Grand
Coat of arms of Mourmelon-le-Grand
Coat of arms
Location of Mourmelon-le-Grand
Mourmelon-le-Grand is located in France
Mourmelon-le-Grand
Mourmelon-le-Grand
Mourmelon-le-Grand is located in Grand Est
Mourmelon-le-Grand
Mourmelon-le-Grand
Coordinates: 49°08′24″N 4°21′57″E / 49.1401°N 4.3658°E / 49.1401; 4.3658Coordinates: 49°08′24″N 4°21′57″E / 49.1401°N 4.3658°E / 49.1401; 4.3658
CountryFrance
RegionGrand Est
DepartmentMarne
ArrondissementChâlons-en-Champagne
CantonMourmelon-Vesle et Monts de Champagne
IntercommunalityCA Châlons-en-Champagne
Government
 • Mayor (2020–2026) Pascal Jaloux
Area
1
23.21 km2 (8.96 sq mi)
Population
 (2017-01-01)[1]
5,085
 • Density220/km2 (570/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
51388 /51400
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

Camp de ChâlonsEdit

The camp de Châlons, also known as camp de Mourmelon, is a military camp of circa 10,000 hectares near Mourmelon-le-Grand. It was created at the behest of Napoleon III and opened August 30, 1857 during the Second French Empire.

The Russian Expeditionary Force in France was stationed here in September 1916.[2]

The camp is used for military manoeuvres, and cavalry training, along with the neighbouring 2,500 hectare large Camp de Moronvilliers.

It was also selected to host the shooting events for the 1924 Summer Olympics in neighbouring Paris

In October 1944 during WWII it served as Army quarters for the 501st 101st Airborne division recovering from the fights in the South of Holland, waiting and training the new replacements for the battles to come. Just before the Battle of Bastogne, where they play an important part in the outcome.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Populations légales 2017". INSEE. Retrieved 6 January 2020.
  2. ^ Steiner, Kurt. "The Russian Expeditionary Forces in France". Alexander Palace. Simple Machines. Retrieved 30 August 2016.