Monitor Action Group

The Monitor Action Group is a political party in Namibia. The party came into existence as the transformation of the National Party of South West Africa in 1991, Kosie Pretorius became its first chairperson and served until his retirement from active politics in June 2013. The party is based among conservative Afrikaners, with most of the top leadership having served in the government of apartheid South West Africa. In June 2009, the party contended that aspects of the affirmative action policy of Namibia violated the country's constitution.[1]

Monitor Action Group
LeaderGernot Schaaf
Founded1991
Preceded byNational Party of South West Africa
HeadquartersWindhoek
IdeologyConservatism
Afrikaner minority politics

Electoral historyEdit

At the parliamentary elections 15 and 16 November 2004, the party won 0.8% of popular votes and 1 out of 72 seats. The party was run by Kosie Pretorius, though Jurie Viljoen was the party's representative in the National Assembly.

In the 2009 election, the party chose not to run a candidate for president, but competed for seats in the National Assembly of Namibia. However, the party received only 4,718 votes, just below the minimum for a seat in the National Assembly. Ahead of the election, the top four party leaders were Kosie Pretorius, Jurie Viljoen, Gernot Wilfrid Schaaf and Eric Peters.[2]

The party's election results further deteriorated in 2014. It did not contest the 2019 Namibian general election.[3]

National Assembly electionsEdit

Election Party leader Votes % Seats +/– Position Government
1994 Kosie Pretorius 4,005 0.8%
1 / 72
  1   5th Opposition
1999 3,618 0.67%
1 / 78
    5th Opposition
2004 6,950 0.85%
1 / 78
    7th Opposition
2009 4,718 0.58%
0 / 72
  1   10th Extra-parliamentary
2014 Gernot Schaaf 3,073 0.34%
0 / 104
    13th Extra-parliamentary

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Aspects of Affirmative Action unconstitutional: Monitor Action Group The Namibian via AllAfrica.com, 16 June 2009
  2. ^ Elections 2009 - MAG Leading Senior Members New Era via AllAfrica.com, 5 October 2009
  3. ^ Iikela, Sakeus (2 December 2019). "Reduced victory ... Swapo, Geingob drop votes". The Namibian. p. 1.