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General elections were held in Namibia on 28 November 2014, although early voting took place in foreign polling stations and for seagoing personnel on 14 November. The elections were the first on the African continent to use electronic voting.[2][3]

2014 Namibian general election

← 2009 28 November 2014 (2014-11-28) 2019 →

1,241,194 registered voters[1]
50%+ votes needed to win
Turnout71.76%
  Hage Geingob.jpg No image.svg
Nominee Hage Geingob McHenry Venaani
Party SWAPO DTA
Popular vote 772,528 44,271
Percentage 86.73 4.97

President before election

Hifikepunye Pohamba
SWAPO

Elected President

Hage Geingob
SWAPO

A total of nine candidates ran for the presidency, whilst 16 political parties contested the National Assembly elections. Hage Geingob of the ruling SWAPO party, won the presidential elections with 87% of the vote. SWAPO also won the National Assembly elections, taking 80% of the vote.

Contents

Presidential electionEdit

CandidatesEdit

Originally, incumbent President Pohamba predicted that twenty-two candidates would contest the presidential election.[4] In the end, only nine political parties submitted presidential candidates.[5]

SWAPOEdit

In 2008, the SWAPO Central Committee produced a policy document stating that the party's candidate would be chosen for each election among the top four Committee members. In March 2011 SWAPO declared that whoever was the party's vice-president following the forthcoming party elections would also be the party's candidate in 2014 for president.[6] Some high-level party members, particularly Kazenambo Kazenambo, advocated that SWAPO choose a non-Ovambo candidate, as the first two Presidents, Sam Nujoma and Pohamba, were from the Ovambo people. Others advocated the selection of a woman.[6] SWAPO indicated that the candidate would be chosen democratically in the 2012 party election.[6]

SWAPO was viewed as the clear favorite going into the election.[3]

Parliamentary electionEdit

SWAPO announced a gender equality system where women would fill half of their seats in parliament. The party also embraced what it called a "zebra system", whereby if a minister was a woman, the deputy minister would be a man, and vice versa. Because there were more male SWAPO MPs than female MPs, SWAPO put forward plans to expand parliament to remove the risk of male MPs losing their seats as a result of this gender policy.[7]

ResultsEdit

PresidentEdit

Candidate Party Votes %
Hage Geingob SWAPO 772,528 86.73
McHenry Venaani Democratic Turnhalle Alliance 44,271 4.97
Hidipo Hamutenya Rally for Democracy and Progress 30,197 3.39
Asser Mbai National Unity Democratic Organisation 16,740 1.88
Henk Mudge Republican Party 8,676 0.97
Ignatius Shixwameni All People's Party 7,266 0.82
Usutuaije Maamberua SWANU 5,028 0.56
Ben Ulenga Congress of Democrats 3,518 0.39
Jan Mukwilongo Namibian Economic Freedom Fighters 2,514 0.28
Total 890,738 100
Registered voters 1,241,194 71.76
Source: ECN

National AssemblyEdit

 
Party Votes % Seats +/–
SWAPO 715,026 80.01 77 +23
Democratic Turnhalle Alliance 42,933 4.80 5 +3
Rally for Democracy and Progress 31,372 3.51 3 –5
All People's Party 20,431 2.29 2 +1
United Democratic Front 18,945 2.12 2 0
National Unity Democratic Organisation 17,942 2.01 2 0
Workers Revolutionary Party 13,328 1.49 2 +2
SWANU 6,354 0.71 1 0
United People's Movement 6,353 0.71 1 New
Republican Party 6,099 0.68 1 0
Congress of Democrats 3,404 0.38 0 –1
Namibian Economic Freedom Fighters 3,259 0.36 0 New
Monitor Action Group 3,073 0.34 0 0
Christian Democratic Voice 2,606 0.29 0 New
National Democratic Party 1,389 0.16 0 0
Democratic Party of Namibia 1,131 0.13 0 0
Total 893,643 100 96 +24
Registered voters/turnout 1,241,194 72.00
Source: ECN

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "National Voters Register 2014" (PDF). Electoral Commission of Namibia. 7 November 2014. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  2. ^ "Namibia to be Africa's first to use e-voting". bdlive.co.za. 15 November 2014. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  3. ^ a b Wendell Roelf, "Namibia's ruling party seen winning Africa's first electronic vote", Reuters, 28 November 2014.
  4. ^ "22 Presidential candidates for Namibian election". The Villager. 21 March 2014. Retrieved 25 May 2014.
  5. ^ "Presidential Candidates: 2014 Elections" (PDF). Electoral Commission of Namibia. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  6. ^ a b c Presidential race thrown wide open New Era, 14 March 2011
  7. ^ Namibia's 'zebra' politics could make it stand out from the global herd The Guardian, 8 July 2014

External linksEdit