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The Monaco Cemetery (French: "Cimetière de Monaco") is the only cemetery in Monaco.[1]

Monaco Cemetery
ABABBAABBA Monaco.jpg
Details
Location La Colle
Country Monaco
Type Public, non-denominational
Find a Grave Monaco Cemetery

OverviewEdit

The cemetery contained 2350 tombs until 2014, when 198 more were built.[1] It is open to the public from 8am to 7pm in the summer and from 8am to 6pm in the winter.[1]

Notable burials include Josephine Baker and her fourth husband, composer Jo Bouillon,[2] Princess Ashraf Pahlavi, Léo Ferré,[2] Marie Bell and her husband Jean Chevrier,[2] Jean-Michel Folon,[3] the pharmaceutical entrepreneur Silas Burroughs, the English writer and composer Anthony Burgess and the English actor Sir Roger Moore.

Many sculptures in the cemetery were designed by Umberto Bassignani.[4]

Since 2008, two computer screens at the entry gate enable visitors to locate specific tombs before they go in.[3]

On 27 August 2015 Albert II, Prince of Monaco dedicated a memorial stele in honour of foreign Jews who were taken from Monegasque hotels by the Nazis during the night of 27–28 August 1942.[5]

Two British soldiers of the First World War are buried at the cemetery; Private A. C. V. Dyer of the Royal Medical Corps, who died in May 1917 aged 22, and Captain Leo Lucas Ralli (of the Ralli baronets) of the Army Service Corps who died in April 1917 aged 33.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Le cimetière". Ville de Monaco. Retrieved December 26, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "Visite funéraire de Monaco". Amis et Passionés du Père-Lachaise. Retrieved December 26, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Verany, Cedric (November 1, 2008). "Monaco Cimetière : des bornes interactives pour retrouver les tombes". Monaco Matin. Retrieved December 26, 2015. 
  4. ^ "La Mairie de Monaco rend hommage à Umberto Bassignani, sculpteur". Mairie de Monaco. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  5. ^ Floux, Florence (August 27, 2015). "Le prince Albert demande pardon pour l'arrestation de juifs à Monaco". 20 Minutes. Retrieved December 26, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Monaco Principality Cemetery". Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Retrieved October 11, 2016.