Water castle

  (Redirected from Moated castle)

A water castle[a][dubious ] is a castle whose site is largely defended by water.[2] It can be entirely surrounded by water-filled moats (moated castle) or natural waterbodies such as island castles in a river or offshore.[dubious ] The term comes from European castle studies, mainly German Burgenkunde, but is sometimes used in English-language popular science books and websites,[3][4] and is mentioned in other more academic works.[5] When stately homes were built in such a location, or a Wasserburg was later rebuilt as a residential manor, the German term becomes Wasserschloss, lit. "water palace/manor".

Plan of Doorwerth Castle (Gelderland, the Netherlands)
Bodiam Castle (Sussex, England)
Mespelbrunn Castle (Bavaria, Germany)

DescriptionEdit

Forde-Johnston describes such a site as "a castle in which water plays a prominent part in the defences."[2][clarification needed] Apart from hindering attackers, an abundant supply of water was also an advantage during a siege.[citation needed] Topographically, such structures are a type of low-lying castle.[citation needed] Such a castle usually had only one entrance, which was via a drawbridge and that could be raised for protection in the event of an attack.[citation needed] To some extent these water castles had a fortress-like character.[clarification needed][citation needed]

There is a further distinction between:

  • castles that are protected by artificial water-filled moats or man-made ponds, i.e. a moated castles
  • castles whose primary means of protection is from natural water bodies such as river courses, or which stand on islands or peninsulas in a natural marshland, pond, lake or sea. Island castles and marsh castles are such examples.[citation needed]

LegacyEdit

In many places in Central Europe castles that had formerly been fortified changed their role or were converted over the course of time so that they became largely representational and residential buildings. The characteristic moats thus lost their original security function, but were retained in some cases as an element of landscaping. Today, in monument conservation circles, they are often described as burdensome, cost-intensive "historic legacies" because of the water damage caused to their foundations. As a result, many moats around castles in Germany have been drained, or more rarely filled, especially since the 1960s.

In Germany, the Wasserburgroute or "Water Castle Route" has been established in the triangle formed by the cities of Aachen, Bonn and Cologne which links 120 castles and palaces.[6][7]

ExamplesEdit

AustriaEdit

BalticEdit

BelgiumEdit

 
Kasteel van Wijnendale (Wijnendale Castle)

Czech RepublicEdit

DenmarkEdit

FinlandEdit

FranceEdit

Please notice that in French "château d'eau [fr]", literally 'water castle', means water tower.

GermanyEdit

 
Bad Rappenau
 
Friedewald water castle
 
Klaffenbach Castle, (16th century, Saxony)
 
Gommern Water Castle

Baden-WürttembergEdit

BavariaEdit

BerlinEdit

BrandenburgEdit

BremenEdit

HamburgEdit

HesseEdit

Lower SaxonyEdit

Mecklenburg-VorpommernEdit

North Rhine-WestphaliaEdit

Rhineland-PalatinateEdit

SaarlandEdit

SaxonyEdit

Saxony-AnhaltEdit

Schleswig-HolsteinEdit

ThuringiaEdit

GreeceEdit

HungaryEdit

ItalyEdit

JapanEdit

LebanonEdit

NetherlandsEdit

PortugalEdit

SlovakiaEdit

SloveniaEdit

SwedenEdit

RomaniaEdit

SwitzerlandEdit

TurkeyEdit

United KingdomEdit

EnglandEdit

ScotlandEdit

WalesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ The term is sometimes hyphenated, see e.g. [1]

ReferencesEdit

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ Gothein 2014, pp. 22, 52, etc.
  2. ^ a b Forde-Johnston, James L. (1979). Great Medieval Castles of Britain. The Bodley Head. p. 163. ISBN 0370302362. Retrieved 20 July 2014. ... Caister is based on the Wasserburg of the Rhine area in Germany. Wasserburg means literally 'water castle' and denotes a castle in which water plays a...
  3. ^ Kaufmann J.E. & Kaufmann H.W. 2004, p. 229.
  4. ^ 12 Wonderful Water Castles at theworldgeography.com. Retrieved 12 March 2021.
  5. ^ Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History 2005, p. 44.
  6. ^ Water castle route at achen-tourismus.de. Retrieved 12 March 2021.
  7. ^ Water Castles Route at nrw-tourism.com. Retrieved 12 March 2021.
  8. ^ a b Fry 1980, p. 89.

GeneralEdit

  • Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History (2005). Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History, Vol. 41, Part 1. Suffolk Institute of Archaeology and History.
  • Fry, Plantagenet Somerset (1996). Castles of Britain and Ireland: The Ultimate Reference Book. David & Charles.
  • Gothein, Marie Luise Schroeter and Walter P. Wright (2014). A History of Garden Art. Cambridge: CUP.
  • Kaufmann, J. E. and H.W. Kaufmann (2004) The Medieval Fortress: Castles, Forts and Walled Cities of the Middle Ages. Cambridge, MA: Da Capo.

External linksEdit