Mioplosus

Mioplosus is an extinct genus of percid fish that lived from the early to middle Eocene.[1] Five species of the genus has been described, Mioplosus labracoides is found in the Green River Formation Lagerstätte. Mioplosus has numerous extant relatives in Northern Hemisphere fresh- and brackish water, as well as fossil relatives in Asia, Europe and New Zealand, and may be closely related to the modern-day Pike-perches (genus Sander).

Mioplosus
Temporal range: Early- Middle Eocene[1]
Mioplossus Labracoides.jpg
Mioplosus labracoides
Scientific classification
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Mioplosus

Mioplosus are similar to modern Percids, and like them have two dorsal fins, the anterior dorsal fin spiny and the posterior soft-rayed. Fossil Mioplosus up to 20 inches (51 cm) have been found, but anything over 16 inches (41 cm) is rare.

Mioplosus have pointed teeth and are believed to have been voracious predators, individuals have been found with fish lodged in its throat. Mioplosus fossils are never found in large groups, which suggest they were solitary.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology. 364: 560. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2009-02-27.
  2. ^ Perciformes - Paleobiology Database